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http://www.theaureport.com/images/lundin.gifWith a number of factors coalescing in the not-too-distant future, the bulls will restore golden days for gold, according to Brien Lundin. As editor of Gold Newsletter, one of the world's oldest and most respected precious metals and mining stock advisories, he should know. With a transition toward an inflationary environment underway, he figures that the worst of the financial crisis has passed and that the market "generally" will not test new lows. In this exclusive chat with The Gold Report, Brien also says we may be surprised to see how quickly greed and speculation replace the fear and trepidation that have gripped the market for the past year or so.

The Gold Report: You were discussing the hazardous transition from deflation to inflation the last time we spoke. At that point, we were in a deflation and you said that the market would test new bottoms before we moved into inflation. Indeed, the market has tested—and bounced back from—new bottoms. Do you think we're still in a deflationary environment?

Brien Lundin: No, I think we're actually in the transition phase. We aren't still involved in that massive deleveraging. While we certainly still have deflation, we're transitioning into an environment where the massive government spending and stimulus programs will create inflation. In fact, the inflationary environment will take some time to develop, but the markets will look ahead toward that point. The markets themselves are transitioning from a safe-haven mindset of investing. They are moving toward a fear of inflation, or a mindset where they're preparing for the return of inflation due to the massive deficits, spending and currency creation.

TGR: The actual inflation will follow the markets? As they begin to realize that inflation is going to occur, will the markets again begin to test new lows?

BL: As we've seen, the stock market has rallied on occasion as investors have gotten a little bit more speculative in their approach. The transition toward an inflationary environment suggests that the worst of the financial crisis and deflation are behind us and that we will see credit loosening up. We will see more fluid capital markets, and we will see a looser-money environment that would be conducive for an economic rebound. But that would also bring about asset inflation, if not direct price inflation.

TGR: Is this your view of what the market is thinking or what actually will happen in the economy?

BL: A bit of both. Right now the market is a bit schizophrenic. It's often in the mode of reacting to negative headlines and economic indicators, in a safe-haven mode where risk is pulled back, where the dollar rebounds, and the dollar is sought after as a safe haven.

Conversely, on some days—and sometimes in the middle of trading sessions—the very opposite occurs, and we see a return to a more speculative-minded market amidst a weaker dollar. We see metals and commodities gaining while conversely (and somewhat ironically) we also see the stocks in general responding positively to that different mindset. That's because it is, at its core, a more speculative mindset.

TGR: Is the investing public ready for a more speculative mindset, given that they've lost an appreciable amount of their asset base?

BL: That depends on how you define the investing public. One of the things I tell people is that fear is a great motivator but greed is the greatest motivator of all. It's very surprising to many how quickly greed can return to the market. The worst feeling of all for investors is not that they may lose a portion of their investment, but that they will get left behind in a rally. They're very much trend-followers in that respect, and as we saw this spring with the rally in the U.S. stock market and in commodities, the valuations quickly got far out of hand and very much divorced from underlying economic fundamentals.

TGR: Is the market's faltering in the first weeks of Q3 just a seasonal summer slump? Or is it the realization that the economic factors are not so positive?

BL: It's really both, and a bit coincidental that it's happening at the same time. This is the typical time for a seasonal slowdown and some removal of investor attention from the markets. By the same token, the market had gone from exceedingly cheap to fairly expensive by virtually all measures of value. The markets were discounting not only a rebound but a very robust economic rebound that really isn't in the cards for some time.

TGR: Once we get through the summer slump, would you expect the market to continue sideways because the fundamentals really haven't changed? Or would you expect it to increase as a more speculative mindset takes hold?

BL: With the very important caveat that anything can happen and another shoe could drop, I think generally we will not retest those lows, and that we will see some reaction to the massive stimulus funding. Probably sometime toward the end of this year or early next year, we'll actually get positive economic growth.

One of the primary reasons for that is not so much that we'll see a massive economic rebound, but the fact that we had gotten so low by so many different measures. Businesses were very quick to react to the economic slowdown—slashing employment, slashing costs, etc. They also were very quick to take any extraordinary charges or write-offs that they could, some of which they'd been holding in abeyance, under the cover of a very depressing market. Everyone posted losses and, in some cases, losses were greater than you might have thought.

The rebound from those levels is not so much a reflection of great economic strength as the fact that the levels had gotten so low, both in terms of the broader economy's employment and growth and in terms of earnings for individual companies. For those reasons, we'll be able to get to some level of positive growth surprisingly easily. Continuing that trend, and really getting to a more robust level of growth, will be a much more difficult task.

TGR: How have the views you've shared influenced your investment strategy?

BL: Short term, I'm telling people to be very cautious, especially in the metals, commodities and mining stocks. Earlier on, people saw some potential promise that we wouldn't have the typical summer slowdown, but those hopes have been largely dashed. There's still the possibility that the metals will rebound, but I think generally we're going to see lower prices through the middle of the summer. Perhaps the last week or so of July and the first couple of weeks in August we should get a bottom in metals prices and conversely, in the mining stocks. It will be kind of a buyer's market. Historically, it is a time when people can pick up bargains, and I think it's going to work out that way again.

TGR: And beyond that?

BL: Going into the fall and, more importantly, into next year, I think the bullish factors are right for gold to perform in a very impressive fashion. The amount of spending and currency creation, the monetization of debt that's occurred, has been absolutely unprecedented. The timing is a bit in question, but the ultimate effect on gold is inevitable.

TGR: Is it inevitable because inflation is imminent?

BL: Yes, certainly from a classical standpoint. Money creation is inflation. Inflation is always a monetary phenomenon; the very creation of fiat currency is monetary inflation. We will see this transmitted to the buying public, not so much in the form of consumer prices as it was typically in the 1970s, but surely in asset prices—prices of stocks, real estate (once that market achieves a bottom), financial assets, commodities, raw materials and energy.

Those prices won't be as directly translated into finished goods and consumer products because of the influence of the developing countries, such as China, India and Thailand, and the depressing effect that imports from those nations have on the prices of consumer goods.

TGR: You're saying the classical inflation we saw in the '70s where everything went up, but this time it will affect asset prices more than consumer goods.

BL: If you consider this a correction in a bull market that began in early 2001 for commodities or specifically for gold, you see that the prices soared yet it didn't translate into a higher consumer price index in the U.S. This is due primarily to the influence of imports from the developing world. Judging from products on the shelves of the Wal-Marts, Sam's Clubs, Costcos and Targets of the world, the American consumer's buying power has never been greater, even though the dollar hasn't done correspondingly well and prices of raw materials soared over the years.

So as compared to previous years, the effects of inflation on the American public are somewhat muted, at least while the developing world supplies many of our finished goods.

TGR: So you don't buy into the concept of owning gold and silver because at some point we'll need a coin to buy a loaf of bread?

BL: I don't think that that will happen. The possibility's always there, but hopefully not. There are major troubles ahead, though; the only way to erase this debt is to through inflation. One of the problems I see is the bond market and interest rates. You can't have the type of debt-to-GDP ratios that we're seeing without a corresponding dramatic rise in interest rates, which will compound the cost of carrying the federal debt load.

Trading partners that hold tremendous U.S. dollar reserves will realize this eventually. So, it's going to be a harrowing three to five years. I certainly wouldn't want to be one of the people working at the Federal Reserve charged with cleaning up this mess.

TGR: Earlier, you said you're looking forward to gold becoming impressively bullish before too long. What are some of your interesting company plays in that sector?

BL: A lot of the companies that we specialize in are in exploration plays. A little bit lower down the food chain, companies that are finding large-scale deposits, and there are a number of companies that have already found significant resources or have discoveries that they're just developing. One of these is Bravo Venture Group ((TSX.V:BVG)). I really like the Homestake Ridge property they're drilling. About 900,000 ounces of gold resource had been calculated there before the discovery of a high-grade system on the project and a greater understanding of the geology. I think their drilling program this summer will go a long way toward substantially increasing that resource.

TGR: Any others?

BL: I also like is Inter-Citic Minerals Inc. ((TSX:ICI)) and Underworld Resources Ltd. ((TSX.V:UW)). Inter-Citic just released a preliminary economic study that shows a 40% internal rate of return on their Dachang Project in China. And, importantly, that study took into account only a portion of the resources that have already been identified. The project is already very viable and has tremendous room to grow. I think the company is very undervalued.

We were perhaps the only newsletter to recommend Underworld, which is a tremendous discovery play in the Yukon, before it made headlines. They have a number of targets on their White Gold project, including two identified gold zones that are being drilled now on the possibility that the two are connected—which would be a very significant strike extension. It's a speculation with tremendous upside potential and what it's already found probably justifies the current share price. The stock got ahead of itself, up to C$2.60 recently, but it has come back down considerably, and I like it at the current level.

TGR: What caused the rapid rise before it settled back down?

BL: Greed and speculation. They had some tremendous drill holes, and people started talking about this being the source of all the gold that was found in the great Yukon Gold Rush at the turn of the last century. The next batch of drill results showed that it's not that simple a story, that its geology is more complex. The project is still growing; it's just going to be a more complicated story than people had envisioned.

TGR: Do these complications mean higher costs of mining?

BL: One of the things you look for in a gold project is where the high grade is going to be to really pay back the capital costs more quickly. They essentially are at that stage already because they started off with a fairly high-grade discovery that will fund construction and development costs. It's fairly simple mineralogy that basically starts close to surface and has a fairly shallow dip. It is a project that will work at some level. What they're doing now is just trying to determine the extent of it and trying to understand the geology a bit better so they can trace the higher-grade zones.

TGR: Are you watching any other companies in particular?

BL: There are a number of them; there's Mantra Mining Inc. ((TSX.V:MAN)) that really was a spin-off of a number of gold projects out of NovaGold Resources Inc. (NYSEMKT:NG). It's just starting, and they have a good property portfolio. It's way too early to make any comparisons, but at least at this early stage, the project they've started drilling has some similarities to NovaGold's Donlin Creek deposit. Investors who buy it now can essentially get a two-for-one with that stock, because they're going to take the company as it exists now and split it into base and precious metals projects.

TGR: Did any NovaGold people go over to Mantra Mining?

BL: Oh, yes. Its Chairman of the Board, Rick Van Nieuwenhuyse, was of course, the driving force behind NovaGold, and I think some other ex-NovaGold people also may be involved.

TGR: Rare earths are getting a lot of buzz now. Is that really a sustainable sector or is it just a flash?

BL: In the long term, I think it is sustainable. The problem has always been that the market has to appreciate the sector before it is going to go anywhere. There is no rare earth bull market; no copper bull market; not even a silver bull market. There's no investor interest in any of these sectors unless a gold bull market draws investors into the arena. Everything else is an offshoot from gold. If you recall, we didn't have that big "uranimania" run in uranium stocks until a bull market in gold had already attracted a large number of speculative investors to the mining and resource sectors.

So that's one prerequisite. The other is that someone influential must champion the sector. Uranium started a very long time ago after Rick Rule brought it to investors' attention. I've recognized a lot of the fundamentals behind the rare earth sector, but I never really championed it because the markets weren't going to look at it any time soon.

John Kaiser (Kaiser Bottom-Fishing Report editor) was perhaps the biggest proponent of the rare earth sector, and its earliest proponent. Now, Jim Dines (Dines Letter editor) has entered the picture, and you see what's happening. He has a very wide following.

Now we're starting to get investor interest in that sector, and I think deservedly so from the fundamentals, but that sector needed the exposure beforehand. I recommended Rare Element Resources Ltd. ((TSX.V:RES)) for its tremendous gold target on its Bear Lodge property. I was one of the first to recommend that stock years ago, along with Bob Bishop (previous editor and publisher of Gold Mining Stock Report) and I think Lawrence Roulston (publisher of Resource Opportunities and GreenTech Opportunities).

But after that, this past spring, the company came out with its 43-101 resource estimate for its rare earth elements, and just doing a very rough, back-of-the-envelope estimation, you can see that they had close to $3 billion in value sitting there in the rare earths. Once they released that report, I came out with yet another recommendation of Rare Element Resources. Then a month later, Jim Dines seized upon the stock.

I still like the company, and I still think that it's going higher. It has two engines driving it right now, and either would justify where the company is right now.

TGR: Even at the current price?

BL: Yes. My readers tripled their money in the stock within a few weeks, and I told them it would be foolish not to think about taking profits. But that said, I still think ultimately the stock has a good ways to go.

TGR: Any other companies you'd like to share with us that you're watching or championing?

BL: A number of companies are in a good spot right now. Linear Gold Corp. (LFCFF.PK) has very aggressive management with some money in the bank. There's a very good chance that they will win a legal dispute and secure a near-term gold-producing project by the end of the month. Beyond that, the company is looking very aggressively at other projects, and at some point will be a producer. And it has already a very good project in Mexico that is joint-ventured.

I like Animas Resources ((OTC:ANIMF), too. They're still in the early stages of exploring a great project in Mexico. Pediment Gold Corp. (PEZGF.PK). That's another good company that has a substantial project and looking to bringing that into production.

ATW Gold Corp. (OTC:ATWGF) is one we've recommended from the outset. It has entered gold production now and I don't think that its value in the market is recognized yet.

Argentex Mining Corporation (AGXM) will be coming out with a resource estimate shortly that I think will surprise the market. It seems that their property in Argentina will work as a multi-metal project.

TGR: You mentioned silver a bit earlier. Any companies in that sector you care to mention?

BL: Two of my favorites, both producers and great growth stories, are Great Panther Resources ((TSX: GPR)) and Endeavour Silver Corp. (NYSE:EXK). They are taking historic Mexican projects that have been under-explored over centuries and bringing them into the modern world by applying current exploration and mining methods.

Another company I like is Silvercorp Metals Inc. (NYSE:SVM); it's primarily a Chinese silver play, but is taking a run at Klondex Mines Ltd. (OTCQX:KLNDF) in the U.S. I don't know whether they will be successful, but it's an example of how this very talented management team is looking to expand its base. It's a cash-rich company with a high-growth production profile, so I think we're going to hear a lot from Silvercorp down the road.

With a career spanning three decades in the investment markets, Brien Lundin serves as president and CEO of Jefferson Financial, a respected publisher of market analyses and producer of investment-oriented events. Under the Jefferson Financial umbrella, he serves as publisher and editor of Gold Newsletter, the cornerstone of precious metals advisories since 1971. It covers not only resource stocks, but also the world of investing, macroeconomics and geopolitical issues. He also hosts the annual New Orleans Investment Conference.

DISCLOSURE: I personally and/or my family own the following companies mentioned in this interview: Bravo Venture Group, Inter-Citic Minerals, Underworld Resources, Mantra Mining, Rare Element Resources, Animas Resources, ATW Gold Corp, Argentex Mining and Silvercorp Metals.

I personally and/or my family am paid by none of the companies mentioned in this interview.

Source: Lundin: Look for Gold to Perform in a 'Very Impressive Fashion'