14 Non-U.S. Companies from the Nasdaq 100 Index

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Includes: AMFW, BBRY, BIDU, CHKP, FLEX, GRMN, INFY, LOGI, MIICF, MRVL, QQQ, RYAAY, STX, TECH, TEVA, WCRX
by: David Hunkar

Many foreign companies are listed on the NASDAQ market. A few of them are part of the NASDAQ 100 Index which is the main index of this market.

Definition of NASDAQ-100 Index from Wikipedia:

"The NASDAQ-100 is a stock market index of 100 of the largest domestic and international non-financial companies listed on the NASDAQ. It is a modified market value-weighted index. The companies' weights in the index are based on their market capitalizations, with certain rules capping the influence of the largest components. It does not contain financial companies, and includes companies incorporated outside the United States. Both of those factors differentiate it from the Dow Jones Industrial Average, and the exclusion of financial companies distinguishes it from the S&P 500 Index."

The 14 foreign incorporated companies included in the NASDAQ 100 are:

  • Bermuda - Marvell Technology Group (NASDAQ:MRVL)
  • Canada - Research In Motion (RIMM)
  • Cayman Islands - Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ:GRMN) and Seagate Technology (NASDAQ:STX)
  • China - Baidu (NASDAQ:BIDU)
  • India - Infosys (NASDAQ:INFY)
  • Ireland - Ryanair (NASDAQ:RYAAY) and Warner Chilcott (NASDAQ:WCRX)
  • Israel - Check Point (NASDAQ:CHKP) and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd. (NASDAQ:TEVA)
  • Luxembourg - Millicom International Cellular (MICC)
  • Singapore - Flextronics (NASDAQ:FLEX)
  • Switzerland - Foster Wheeler (FWLT) and Logitech (NASDAQ:LOGI)

A brief intro on some of the companies:

RIMM is the Canadian company that makes the famous Blackberry wireless handheld devices. Baidu is a search engine company and is called the "Google of China". Infosys is one of the top IT outsourcers in India. Ireland-based Ryan Air operates cheap discount flights in Europe competing against other discount carries such as EasyJet. Teva is a generic drug maker based in Israel. Security software maker Checkpoint used to be a hi-flier during the dot com era.