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Abbott has some difficult times ahead with their fenofibrate franchise. That's TriCor, and its newer formulation, TriLipix. Fenofibrate, as I've mentioned here before, is an oddity among drugs. It was discovered way before anyone had a mechanism of action, and even now, while it's supposed to be a PPAR-alpha ligand, no one's completely happy with that explanation. (For one thing, it's not very potent at that nuclear receptor, while other PPAR-alpha compounds have crashed in clinical trials for various reasons). But it can lower triglycerides and raise HDL, which should both (in theory) be beneficial effects, and it's been a big seller over the years.

But how much good does it do? That's always the big, important, slow question in the cardiovascular field. The data for fenofibrate have always been somewhat messy (although probably positive overall), but a new study has muddied things up. As the FDA puts it, in the documents for an advisory committee meeting tomorrow (PDF):

Over the last 40 years laboratory and clinical data have suggested the potential of fibrates to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from large clinical outcomes trials have produced mixed results. The inconsistent outcomes may be a result of differences in pharmacodynamic properties among individual fibrates or study populations or both.

The new data, from a trial called ACCORD-Lipid, is another one looking at fenofibrate plus a statin, which is the usual combination (that way, at least in theory, you go after triglycerides, low HDL, and high LDL simultaneously). But this trial, in a large population of diabetic patients, showed that overall, the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events was statistically identical between the statin/fenofibrate and statin/placebo groups. No advantage! It gets trickier with a bit of subgroup analysis: women showed some evidence of worse outcomes with fenofibrate as opposed to statin alone. The group that seemed to benefit, on the other hand, were the patients who started out with the highest triglycerides and the lowest HDL. (See that FDA file above for all the numbers and more).

That's disconcerting. Is fenofibrate only helping the worst-off patients, and doing nothing (or worse) for the others? That a question worth wrestling with for a drug that sold well over a billion dollars last year. And beyond that is the same sort of question that came up when all the ezetimibe data hit: how much do we really know about blood markers versus real cardiovascular outcomes? Can you hit the various numbers by different routes, some of which are beneficial and some of which aren't? What is it that we're not understanding?

Disclosure: None

Source: New Study Casts Doubt on Effectiveness of Abbott's TriCor/TriLipix