Research Note - March 2016

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Includes: DIA, QQQ, SPY
by: Manning & Napier

Back to Where We Started

The performance of the S&P 5001 in the first quarter of 2016 was ordinary and rather extraordinary at the same time. This proxy for U.S. large-cap stocks closed the quarter up 0.77% (excludes dividends), which is a little light in terms of the historical average return but well within historical norms. This is only part of the story, however. As even the most casual student of the markets is keenly aware, the opening three months of 2016 were far from tranquil. The S&P 500 experienced a drawdown of over 10% before rallying strongly to close the quarter in positive territory. To put this feat into proper context, the first quarter of 2016 ranks as the greatest intra-quarter drawdown recovery dating back to the start of 1980.

We believe fears of weak economic activity leading to outright recession have driven a lot of the volatility experienced in the stock market this year. These fears were fed by a downturn in economic indicators such as the Institute for Supply Management's manufacturing purchasing managers' index (PMI). The market rally in March was due in part to the emergence of evidence suggesting that the economy was not in freefall. For example, a number of the regional Federal Reserve manufacturing activity surveys showed noteworthy improvements during the month. These improvements were recently confirmed in the manufacturing PMI itself, which moved back into expansion territory (i.e., a reading greater than 50) in March.

It is important not to put too much weight on any individual data point, but the weight of the evidence at the moment suggests that our slow growth base case has again weathered a minor crisis of confidence.

Investors are, in many ways, back to where they started 2016. Valuations for U.S. stocks have rallied toward their highs for the current market cycle. At the same time, our overall expectation for slow, below trend economic growth remains unchanged. This combination of relatively full valuations and modest growth expectations continues to present a challenge for equity investors.

The lack of strong tailwinds - such as compelling valuations or prospects for robust top-line growth - should not be confused with a stock market facing outright headwinds of unsustainably high valuations, rampant speculation, or an overheating economy. We continue to believe that the current environment is one that requires an active approach to asset allocation that seeks to benefit from episodes of market volatility. Consistent with this perspective, we increased our recommended allocation to equities in January as market fears continued to build. The recent rally in equities returned many of our indicators to readings similar to those present at the start of the year. Furthermore, measures of investor sentiment such as the VIX index and the Investors Intelligence bull/bear ratio have become less pessimistic in recent weeks as the S&P 500 has moved back up.

In light of these developments, we have opted to reduce our recommended allocation to stocks, effectively removing the tactical additions from earlier in 2016. Our indicator framework suggests a modest overweight allocation to stocks is appropriate today, with the most attractive opportunities coming outside of the United States. We believe valuations in many of these markets are more attractive. This is particularly true for measures such as price-to-five-year average earnings, which seeks to show valuations under a normalized earnings environment. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding growth internationally, many of our indicators suggest a more attractive risk/reward profile for equity markets outside of the United States.

Investors are likely hoping for calmer waters for the rest of the year after the turbulent first three months of 2016. While anything is possible, we believe that further volatility over the course of the year cannot be ruled out. The exact timing and cause of volatility will be difficult (if not impossible) to predict, making it essential to be prepared in advance to act. We are closely monitoring the economic, valuation, and sentiment landscape so that when volatility inevitably returns, we are armed with an understanding of where opportunities may exist.

1The S&P 500 Price Return Index is an unmanaged, capitalization-weighted measure of 500 widely held common stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange, and the Over-the-Counter market. The Index returns do not reflect any fees or expenses and does not include the reinvestment of dividends. Unless otherwise noted, Index returns provided by Bloomberg. S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC, a subsidiary of the McGraw Hill Financial, Inc., is the publisher of various index based data products and services and has licensed certain of its products and services for use by Manning & Napier. All such content Copyright © 2016 by S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Neither S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC, Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC, their affiliates nor their third party licensors make any representation or warranty, express or implied, as to the ability of any index to accurately represent the asset class or market sector that it purports to represent and none of these parties shall have any liability for any errors, omissions, or interruptions of any index or the data included therein.

2The MSCI World Index excluding the U.S. (MSCI WorldxUS) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is designed to measure global developed market equity performance and consists of 22 developed market country indices. The Index returns do not reflect any fees or expenses. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. The Index returns do not reflect any fees, expenses, or reinvestment of dividends. Unless otherwise noted, Index returns provided by Bloomberg.

3The MSCI USA Index (MSCI US) is a free float-adjusted index that is comprised of large and mid cap segments of the U.S. market. The index is classified in accordance with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS®) and screened by size, liquidity, and minimum free float. The Index returns do not reflect any fees, expenses, or reinvestment of dividends. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars.

4The MSCI Emerging Markets Index (MSCI EM) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is designed to measure equity market performance of emerging markets and consists of 23 emerging market country indices outside the U.S. The Index returns do not reflect any fees or expenses. The Index is denominated in U.S. dollars. The Index returns do not reflect any fees, expenses, or reinvestment of dividends. Unless otherwise noted, Index returns provided by Bloomberg.