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Andrew Ross Sorkin Tuesday asks why Treasury is letting AIG (NYSE:AIG) keep billions of dollars in net operating losses, rather than forcing it to pay income tax. I’ll hazard a guess at one part of the answer, as informed by my conversation with Jim Millstein in October 2010: if you want to have a high value for your insurance company, you want it to have a rock-solid credit rating. And so you boost the value of the equity cushion in the company by padding it with net operating loss carryovers and the like, even if that means you lose a certain amount of corporate income tax in the meantime.

But there’s something else going on here too, which is the optics of the AIG bailout. The New York Fed Tuesday announced that it had finally exited its Maiden Lane II portfolio — the toxic securities bought at a discount from AIG in the 2008 bailout — at a healthy profit of $2.8 billion. It held on to those securities in May 2011, when AIG itself offered to buy them back at a much more modest profit for the Fed. And when forced to choose sides between AIG and the Fed in 2011, Treasury sided with AIG. At all times, Treasury wants what’s best for AIG’s share price, so that it can, hopefully sooner rather than later, sell off its entire 77% stake in the company at some kind of profit.

It’s already taken longer than Treasury would have liked: there was a feeling when I spoke to Millstein that the sale of AIG might be reasonably imminent, and yet here we are, more than 16 months later, and we don’t seem to be all that much closer to such an event. So unless and until AIG gets sold, expect Treasury to continue to shower it with as much regulatory forbearance as it can possibly corral.

I’m sure there are a lot of people at Treasury who would dearly love the company to be fully privatized before the election, and there’s essentially no chance that’ll happen if the share price is much below the break-even point of $29 per share. We’re close, now, and I’m sure that Treasury wishes that AIG had managed to buy back those Maiden Lane II assets on the cheap so that the share price could have been even higher. There’s still time to privatize AIG while Tim Geithner is still Treasury secretary. And Treasury will do everything it can to make that happen, if it can do so without exiting at a loss.

Disclosure: None.

Source: Why Treasury Is Being So Nice To AIG