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Andrew Shapiro

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  • GE Takes a Big Stake in Sirius XM [View article]
    As net neutrality falls and internet bandwidth cost increases with increased use. Radio satellite feed offers providers one of few remaining bastions of fixed cost model.
    Nov 15 01:53 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Legg Mason's Bill Miller looks at QE2 and sees 15% gains for stocks over the next year: "The Fed wants the stock market to go up, and they will do what’s necessary" to pump equities and get the "wealth effect" of stock prices to stimulate growth.  [View news story]
    Rather than throw QE money at banks for them to speculate in stocks and hope higher equity prices will trickle down into fixing what ails the economy secondarily, Fed could repair bank balance sheets and relieve debt burdened consumers, all at the same time, by using the same money to buy foreclosed houses, rent them at lower but market rates to prior homeowners.

    This also has the effect of loan modifications, which the banks are slow in doing and clears the properties from current home sales overhang while increasing disposable income direct into the 'consumer' rather than QE trickle down from bubbled equity and commodity securities that will BARELY get to consumers.
    Nov 15 01:28 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Early Evidence: QE Does More Harm Than Good [View article]
    Jeach - the problem with your approach is that the fed's money they put out is going to the banks to pay the loan off at par which includes the airball the crummy underwriters lent on and mostly rewards the worst offenders while the unemployed bankrupt homeowner is homeless.

    My concept is to buy the foreclosed property at reduced value and clear properties from the market with rentback at lower market rates to the former homeowner. More bang for same fed dollar rather than getting fewer homes/loans by paying full inflated loan value. Airball values taken out from both the bad original loan value plus the non-existent equity of the homeowners.

    It is important the former homeowner is rented to at new lower but market rate. This is basically a modification that clears property from home sales overhang while increasing disposable income direct into the 'consumer' rather than QE trickle down from bubbled equity and commodity securities that will barely get to consumer.
    Nov 12 07:15 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Early Evidence: QE Does More Harm Than Good [View article]
    Rather than throw QE money at banks for them to speculate in stocks and hope higher equity prices will trickle down into fixing what ails the economy secondarily, Fed could repair bank balance sheets and relieve debt burdened consumers, all at the same time, by using the same money to buy foreclosed houses, rent them at lower rates to prior homeowners.
    Nov 12 11:27 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Netflix Inks Content Delivery Deal With Level 3, Confirms Akamai Worries [View article]
    I don't have a dog in this debate between LVLT, AKAM or any other cdn. However, there is a big difference between the actual press release's language that says LVLT becoming "a" primary CDN and your writing here which says LVLT becoming "the" primary CDN.
    Nov 12 12:28 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Level 3 (LVLT) is +16.50 % after formally announcing it's becoming one of the primary content delivery networks to Netflix (NFLX), replacing Akamai (AKAM) -2.97%. Level 3 plans to double storage capacity to store the entire Netflix library. It also will increase the size of its data pipes to handle the 19M customers Netflix anticipates by year's end.  [View news story]
    I don't have a dog in this debate between LVLT, AKAM or any other cdn. However, there is a big difference between the actual press release's language that says "a" primary CDN and Seeking Alpha's headline here which says "the" primary CDN. This is how all the unfounded rumors swirling on these two stocks has surfaced in the first place. SA ought to fix this error and then you can remove my comment.
    Nov 11 03:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Fed's inability to cut interest rates below zero is the main reason the U.S. consumer isn't spending his way out of recession this time around, economist Robert Hall explained today at a Fed conference. In lieu, the Fed is using a variation on the same theme to make current purchasing cheaper than future: inflation-inflating QE.  [View news story]
    absolutely not- but trying to add to the discussion in a concise cohesive sound bite.
    Nov 11 02:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Fed's inability to cut interest rates below zero is the main reason the U.S. consumer isn't spending his way out of recession this time around, economist Robert Hall explained today at a Fed conference. In lieu, the Fed is using a variation on the same theme to make current purchasing cheaper than future: inflation-inflating QE.  [View news story]
    Why don't we repair bank balance sheets and relieve debt burdened consumers all at the same time by having fed use the same money to buy foreclosed houses, rent the them at lower rates to prior homeowners rather than throw this money at banks for them to speculate in stocks and hope higher equity prices will transfer into fixing what ails the economy secondarily?
    Nov 11 02:51 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Thursday: The Fed’s Got POMO Fever [View article]
    Your illustration of the scope of POMO relative the number of houses, and bad mortgages,etc. raises this point.

    Why don't we repair bank balance sheets and relieve debt burdened consumers all at the same time by having fed use the same money to buy foreclosed houses, rent the them at lower rates to prior homeowners rather than throw this money at banks for them to speculate in stocks and hope higher equity prices will transfer into fixing what ails the economy secondarily?
    Nov 11 02:45 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • China-Biotics: Your Next 5x Investment [View article]
    64 to only 7 is a huge drop in just 3 months.

    Did all those leases simply expire in that short window or where was lease termination expenses for so many stores?

    What did the leases shown at Investor Day say? How many were said to be open at Investor Day or was that after September 30?
    Nov 10 03:25 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Just One Stock: Come for the Real Estate; Stick Around for Popcorn and Flicks [View article]
    I appreciate this sentiment and it was expressed in the comment thread up above (around sept 30) and in other RDI article threads. I think projecting declining industry attendance due your personal individual attendance drop due to “high prices” or others concerned with those "darn noisy texting teenagers" may cloud approaching the attendance issue objectively.

    Prices have gone up. But, inflation adjusted, not by as much as you think. Still, by far, going out to a movie remains one of the least expensive forms of out-of-home entertainment available. Compare a pair of movie tickets + concessions to same at football, basketball, broadway, comedy club or other form of entertainment. "Date night" is not going away in the long run and it is the quality of movie product is what drives attendance in the short run.

    Overall worldwide movie attendance has been and remains stable to up. US Movie attendance has been fairly stable, averaging between 1.2 billion and 1.4 billion admissions annually since 1994. (Source: National Association of Theatre Owners [NATO]) Over the same period of time, international admissions have grown decently. During this >15-year stretch, there has not yet been secular decline, despite higher ticket prices, higher concession prices, the advent of home video technology (regardless of tape, dvd or streaming) or from more noisy, unruly attendees.

    It should not be surprising that the older one gets, the less likely they are to go to the cinema. The drop off is quite steep. According to one survey from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, about 93 per cent of 15–17 year-olds go the cinema, dropping to a low of only 27 per cent of people aged 75 years and over. abs.gov.au/
    Studios have a core demographic and each year we are maturing up or out of that core, while others are entering.

    The primary driver of attendance is not price, but simply the supply of quality movie product. A secondary, albeit macro driver, is population age distribution.
    Nov 10 03:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ChartFacts: 3.6 Million Data Sets at Your Fingertips [View article]
    I understand better how chart fact data and charts can be employed in an article but is there a way and how can chart fact data and charts be employed in a comment to an article?
    Nov 10 11:45 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • China-Biotics: Your Next 5x Investment [View article]
    Curious to know the answers to the questions posed in above post. Is there an newer article where yesterday's CHBT earnings are being debated?
    Nov 10 09:34 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 30% Upside for Netflix From Falling Subscriber Acquisition Costs [View article]
    no the editors may reword title to shorten it but us authors have more control over that issue.
    Nov 9 12:31 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Zero Hedge sticks it to Jim Cramer, lambasting the CNBC pundit's earlier pitch to chase the "animal spirits" in Ambac (ABK -51.2%), now nearing bankruptcy: Those who followed his clarion call "are now facing yet another complete loss... as Cramer-espoused momentum trading is proven once again to lead to nothing but financial ruin."  [View news story]
    Cramer does it again- $ABK- Ambac files for bankruptcy protection.

    dealbook.nytimes.com/2...
    Nov 8 08:22 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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