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Boris Marjanovic

 
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  • Twitter Shares Are Junk, Too! [View article]
    Stockbroker,

    "Twitter have at least 5% fake accounts- Same goes for Facebook, spammers are everywhere."

    It's definitely true that all of these social media platforms have a significant percentage of fake accounts. Twitter, as I mentioned in my article, estimates that fake accounts make up ~5% of total accounts. However, I think the company is not being totally truthful here. I've seen research studies that suggest that over 10% of Twitter accounts are fake. I think even this number is probably too low.

    Twitter, more so than any other social media platform, is the easiest to set up fake account on. In fact, as most of you probably know, you can easily buy thousands of fake Twitter followers for as little as $5-$10. A while ago I even developed a simple hack that got me a little over 25k followers in less than 48 hours (don't worry, it was a test account I set up).

    And what about celebrity Twitter accounts? Back in 2013 it was discovered that Obama alone had ~20 million fake followers. In other words, just the fake followers Obama has makes up well over 5% of Twitter's entire user base. The same goes for pretty much all celebrities on Twitter... fake followers generally make up over 50% of their total followers.

    Overall, I think Twitter is vastly underestimating the percentage of fake accounts. I believe a more realistic estimate is 10%-15% fake accounts.
    Dec 9, 2014. 11:32 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Alibaba: Where Things Stand Now [View article]
    Bill,

    It doesn't matter how many million, billions, or trillions of computers look at something, it doesn't make it useful. It's investment performance that matters in the end, nothing else.
    Dec 8, 2014. 06:03 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Alibaba: Where Things Stand Now [View article]
    Bill,

    Name one fund (with good long-term performance) that relies on simple technicals (like the ones you love to write about) to make trades. I develop sophisticated trading algorithms with my team at my company. We have "back tested" and "front tested" every trading strategy you can think of. In other words, I know my stuff, and I have a huge amount of empirical evidence to back up my claims if I have to.
    Dec 8, 2014. 04:01 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Alibaba: Where Things Stand Now [View article]
    "With shares trading for more than 50 days, we now have a 50-day moving average line that we can show in a stock chart."

    "The 50-day moving average has crossed above $100 a share, and that line could provide support if shares were to trade down to that level."

    It's truly amazing what kind of nonsense some people believe, and then, sadly, write about for others to see. A "moving average" is just a simple mathematical equation, it won't provide support for anything. When a stock trades below its 50 day MA, people like you then look at the 100 day MA, 200, day MA, etc... basically you keep using a longer and longer MA (in other words, a lower support level) until you're proven right. This is simply the ultimate form of financial charlatanism. My problem is not that you're deluding yourself with your pseudo-mathematics, but it will make less experienced investors think that this stuff actually works, and they will end up losing money following your bad advice.
    Dec 8, 2014. 11:35 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Glenway Fripp,

    "The goat standard"

    That is hilarious!
    Dec 5, 2014. 07:04 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Apple The Most Important Stock On Earth? [View article]
    Constable,

    I used to work with a lot of Wall Street analysts when I was starting out in the investment business and I was disgusted by what I saw. Most of those estimates, forecasts, and projections you read about are a total joke disguised as something that looks important.

    I used to know a tech analyst who actually won a bunch of "awards" for his "excellent" research. When he would come up with fair value estimates, for example, he would first guess what the company is worth (usually 20% to 30% above the current stock price) and then he would play around with his forecasts and DCF models to match his predetermined fair value estimate.

    Simply put, people should not listen to Wall Street analysts... these guys are the biggest charlatans in the world.
    Dec 4, 2014. 10:00 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Apple The Most Important Stock On Earth? [View article]
    Citi,

    It's always funny to see these so called "analysts" raising their price targets when a stock is going up, or lowering them when a stock is going down. Anybody who listens to these charlatans deserves to lose money.
    Dec 3, 2014. 09:28 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Twitter Has A Compelling Ten-Year Growth Trajectory [View article]
    Rhoadsie,

    Don't be too confident that you, and everyone reading this, will be alive in 2024! Still, it is way more probable than Twitter ever generating meaningful profits to justify its ridiculous valuation.
    Dec 2, 2014. 08:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Twitter Has A Compelling Ten-Year Growth Trajectory [View article]
    "Exclude the non-cash charges like share based compensation and yes they earn a profit."

    Exclude this, this, this, this, and this and they earn a profit!!!! Nice!

    Also, just to let you know share based compensation causes dilution which forces the company to eventually buy back stock (using real cash) to prevent further dilution.... share based compensation is compensation (if it is not, what is it then?) and compensation should be treated as an expense. Simple as that!
    Dec 2, 2014. 08:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Tom,

    "Money CAN have intrinsic value."

    There is nothing "intrinsic" about value.... all value is purely subjective.
    Dec 2, 2014. 01:19 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Tom,

    Salt or goats were part of the bartering system.
    Dec 2, 2014. 11:04 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Jimvickery,

    "You called debt currency the 'oldest and most enduring' form of money (without any references), by the way it isn't , gold is, so I quoted J.P. Morgan. I never said anything about what I 'approve' of or don't 'approve' of."

    Gold is also not the "oldest and most enduring" form of money.... the first form of money was actually bartering.
    Dec 2, 2014. 10:51 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Kyle,

    "But gold should not be used to "become rich." It is used to store wealth, not create it."

    I agree. I even mentioned something similar in my article. However, he was talking about how he could have generated returns if he invested in gold. I simply gave a few examples of where the investment returns would have been even greater.
    Dec 1, 2014. 02:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Trendless,

    "Having bought and sold houses, old guitars, classic art and lava lamps, I can say with certainty that nearly everything can be valued at whatever someone wants to pay at any given moment."

    I agree. This is also why nothing has "intrinsic value." It's all based on personal preferences, which change all the time.

    "What gets me are the fearful and the fearmongerers who project sky-high price tags for precious metals based on potential doomsday scenarios. Until the apocalypse comes, however, they're very happy to take your lousy fiat currency in exchange for the stuff."

    Yes, it's very ironic, isn't it? The people who hate "paper money" usually have the most of it.

    "The iron-clad measure of anything's "value" is its rarity AND desirability."

    100% correct!
    Nov 29, 2014. 09:12 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold Is Way Overrated [View article]
    Sawdustmaker,

    I see no reason why a person couldn't own a very small amount of PM. However, those recommending that you should have 30,40, 50, or more percent of your assets in PM are giving out foolish advice.
    Nov 29, 2014. 07:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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