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  • CFTC subpoenas metals warehouse company [View news story]
    The Increasing Elitism of Mining
    LME metal warehouses are falling under scrutiny by regulators after years of criticism by end metal users. This has highlighted an interest in the dealings of metal and the lack of genuine oversight. Current oversight is conducted by the LME itself, a private global corporation regulating itself. We are now seeing internal metal warehouse manipulation. What we are not seeing is the overarching affect the LME warehouses have on the evolution of the physical metal supply market, also known as mining. The current regulators are assessing whether banks should be in physical commodities, but the big question not being asked is whether mining companies should be in trading and storage. Consider the implications if the - mining community - were able to manipulate the long-term supply of the world’s [Ore] into a constricted supply mining industry. You would think this would be a large concern for regulators, investors and government officials desperate for economic growth. However, if it took more than two years for the current regulators to heed the genuine and explicit concern by end users of aluminium, how long do you think it would take a regulator to rework their focus to a bottom up, mining to trading, scenario. Mining has an anomaly called Glencore-Xstrata; this company is unique, as it has long crossed the divide between trading/storage and mining. What does Glencore see? What does it know about the market that is being missed by so many others? Passive Long is the lunch of the day. What Glencore possibly sees is what I call the increasing elitism of mining. Over the past decade or so, we have seen the constant increase in mining costs. It has never definitively been explained as to why costs continually increase, it is just accepted by the everyone, and the miners say, “Leave it to us”. Certain mining leaders understand that if you are able to prevent underground mining from becoming extremely efficient or becoming “ore factories,” aka block mining, like Rio Tinto describes, then as surface mining ore deposits deplete, and underground mining is unable take up the slack, the mining costs continually increase (aka the price floor). When metal markets move down, as they do in business cycles, the obvious scalability allows big miners to survive. However, the medium to small miners shut due to the high costs - high price floor, along with the increasing volatility of the LME design, this describes how big miners do reduce supply from mine sites other than their own. Explanation: Miners do not dig with their hands, they use machines – they use systems – they use techniques, all derived from only three important mining machinery manufacturing companies globally. These three companies had the ability to shape the evolution of global underground metal extraction for the last 50 years, hand in hand with big miners. http://bit.ly/17bUdv3 studies and questions these three important companies to shows their important relationship with all other aspects of global metal supply including the LME warehouses.
    By Brendon Butler
    Aug 25, 2013. 12:19 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Global Discovery Of A Physical Market Restructuring [View article]
    Here is the link to the Publication that has the mining industry deafeningly silent:
    http://bit.ly/ZTmuFj
    Mar 2, 2013. 02:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Decades Of Built-Up Artificial Metal Commodity Scarcity Unearthed [View article]
    Brendon Butler on youtube discussing commodities and the global economy.
    46 seconds to boost the global economy on youtube http://bit.ly/TzqjGe
    Nov 11, 2012. 01:22 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • BHP Billiton (BHP) has quietly started looking for a successor to CEO Marius Kloppers, FT reports, in what could herald a further shake-up in global mining industry leadership. BHP likely wants to avoid a situation similar to Anglo American, where Cynthia Carroll announced her departure and the company has just started to look for a new chief executive. [View news story]
    Global metal commodity scarcity engineered over decades has just been uncovered and could greatly boost global manufacturers. BHP may have been involved in some form.
    Be a good idea for BHP investors to be aware. Follow the link to the publication and decide how to manage your invesments.

    http://bit.ly/TZtgjO
    Nov 7, 2012. 01:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Closer Look At Canada's Commodity Industry [View article]
    This is the first ever publication that proves artificial commodity scarcity and the companies behind it.

    Commodity scarcity, the 100year evolutionary development.
    Underground mining comprises of three major machinery suppliers namely: Sandvik, Atlas Copco and Caterpillar (SACC).
    The evolution of predominantly these three companies has been of great interest to me. Concerning how they have chosen to develop each of their respective underground hard rock capabilities (Base and Precious metals). However, even more interesting is the truly staggeringly indirect flow on benefits these “managed” evolutions have had on their companies and the industry as a whole.
    A completely original concept shows that SACC have restricted faster underground hard rock mining techniques and increased the costs of underground mining. In order to increase global commodity prices that benefit them many times over when it comes to surface mining and exploration machinery sales.
    Do SACC know that their development path leads them to far greater profits and industry control?
    Do mining companies suspect or somehow benefit from high commodity prices due to this slow underground product evolution?
    It is an interesting investigation, considering this is the base from which our global economy is driven.
    Below is a link that describes the issues with the current system, how to fix them and justifications for their changes. It is a comprehensive and somewhat technical publication, but with what is at stake for all investors and struggling economies it is very much worth the read.
    http://bit.ly/TZtgjO
    A market correction would include global base metal commodity price falls of 2-3-4 fold or more over the next couple of years. The effects of this on the US market would increase company reinvestment in the manufacturing sector as their base metal purchasing costs drop and market confidence is boosted.
    The flow on effect of this will be passed on throughout every sector in the economy.
    In order for a correction to happen, a force more wanting than all the mining industry benefactors needs to take charge. I recommend an Independent International Enquiry Committee to be set up to create the backbone to a global market correction.
    Demand your Government leaders to investigate this economy boosting method.
    Original Work
    Written by, Brendon Butler.
    Nov 5, 2012. 07:13 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Deeper Look At China's Commodity Industry [View article]
    Global Metal Commodities and what you don't know is coming!!

    Global Mining and Manufacturer’s Corporate Agendas
    Understanding the current base and precious metal mining industry is something that many people think they know. Mining is conducted in underground and surface mines, what more is there to know.
    Understanding there are two types of mining, would it be ‘historically’ plausible to think that global mining machinery manufacturers could restrict underground mining in order to increase the number of high sales value surface mining operations worldwide?
    It is a serious thought to think, considering that there are only really three dominating underground base and precious metal mining machinery manufacturers globally.
    My name is Brendon Butler and I have spent over seven years researching this very topic. It has seen me into jobs and self-funded research that has allowed me access to all relevant areas of research. I have spoken with regional manufacturer managers, mining contractor general managers, mine managers, project managers, many internationally experienced underground mining operators, manufacturer distributers, etc. In all of the interactions undertaken, not one person has said or implied that this topic is indeed incorrect. Many have said it does hold merit.
    If many industry members each understand that, there are fundamental inefficiencies in the mining industry. Then how has the underground mining industry still been allowed to be restricted, and who may have supported it? Legitimate questions to be asked and answered.
    The complexities of this topic need to be understood in a global scale. If you restrict underground mining (where most high value ore is located) then you essentially lock that supply away. This in turn increases the value of the metals globally (over many decades) thus increasing the number of surface mining operations using large efficient mining equipment.
    High commodity prices would benefit the manufacturers that make the underground mining equipment, the surface mining equipment and the exploration mining equipment. However, because this may have been slowly played out over many decades, it will have also increased the margins made by mining companies on the value of metals sold.
    It is an extraordinarily powerful concept that could only be proved by calling the practice out or getting the protagonists to prove it is not true.
    This task is now upon us all. A publication containing years of research on how to prove, call out, fix, and improve mining is now available in the following link: http://bit.ly/TZtgjO
    Understanding the effect on the global economy, considering the influence commodity prices have on global growth. Is it advisable that all who read this article read the new publication and demand your economic leaders to respond, considering the current economic conditions?
    Written by, Brendon Butler.
    Nov 3, 2012. 06:03 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Deeper Look At China's Commodity Industry [View article]
    Global Metal Commodities and you don't know is coming!

    Global Mining and Manufacturer’s Corporate Agendas
    Understanding the current base and precious metal mining industry is something that many people think they know. Mining is conducted in underground and surface mines, what more is there to know.
    Understanding there are two types of mining, would it be ‘historically’ plausible to think that global mining machinery manufacturers could restrict underground mining in order to increase the number of high sales value surface mining operations worldwide?
    It is a serious thought to think, considering that there are only really three dominating underground base and precious metal mining machinery manufacturers globally.
    My name is Brendon Butler and I have spent over seven years researching this very topic. It has seen me into jobs and self-funded research that has allowed me access to all relevant areas of research. I have spoken with regional manufacturer managers, mining contractor general managers, mine managers, project managers, many internationally experienced underground mining operators, manufacturer distributers, etc. In all of the interactions undertaken, not one person has said or implied that this topic is indeed incorrect. Many have said it does hold merit.
    If many industry members each understand that, there are fundamental inefficiencies in the mining industry. Then how has the underground mining industry still been allowed to be restricted, and who may have supported it? Legitimate questions to be asked and answered.
    The complexities of this topic need to be understood in a global scale. If you restrict underground mining (where most high value ore is located) then you essentially lock that supply away. This in turn increases the value of the metals globally (over many decades) thus increasing the number of surface mining operations using large efficient mining equipment.
    High commodity prices would benefit the manufacturers that make the underground mining equipment, the surface mining equipment and the exploration mining equipment. However, because this may have been slowly played out over many decades, it will have also increased the margins made by mining companies on the value of metals sold.
    It is an extraordinarily powerful concept that could only be proved by calling the practice out or getting the protagonists to prove it is not true.
    This task is now upon us all. A publication containing years of research on how to prove, call out, fix, and improve mining is now available in the following link: http://bit.ly/TZtgjO
    Understanding the effect on the global economy, considering the influence commodity prices have on global growth. Is it advisable that all who read this article read the new publication and demand your economic leaders to respond, considering the current economic conditions?
    Written by, Brendon Butler.
    Nov 3, 2012. 01:05 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Global Warming Will Push Gold Higher [View article]
    All of you don't understand what is about to happen to metal commodities. Things are about to change.

    Global Mining and Manufacturer’s Corporate Agendas
    Understanding the current base and precious metal mining industry is something that many people think they know. Mining is conducted in underground and surface mines, what more is there to know.
    Understanding there are two types of mining, would it be ‘historically’ plausible to think that global mining machinery manufacturers could restrict underground mining in order to increase the number of high sales value surface mining operations worldwide?
    It is a serious thought to think, considering that there are only really three dominating underground base and precious metal mining machinery manufacturers globally.
    My name is Brendon Butler and I have spent over seven years researching this very topic. It has seen me into jobs and self-funded research that has allowed me access to all relevant areas of research. I have spoken with regional manufacturer managers, mining contractor general managers, mine managers, project managers, many internationally experienced underground mining operators, manufacturer distributers, etc. In all of the interactions undertaken, not one person has said or implied that this topic is indeed incorrect. Many have said it does hold merit.
    If many industry members each understand that, there are fundamental inefficiencies in the mining industry. Then how has the underground mining industry still been allowed to be restricted, and who may have supported it? Legitimate questions to be asked and answered.
    The complexities of this topic need to be understood in a global scale. If you restrict underground mining (where most high value ore is located) then you essentially lock that supply away. This in turn increases the value of the metals globally (over many decades) thus increasing the number of surface mining operations using large efficient mining equipment.
    High commodity prices would benefit the manufacturers that make the underground mining equipment, the surface mining equipment and the exploration mining equipment. However, because this may have been slowly played out over many decades, it will have also increased the margins made by mining companies on the value of metals sold.
    It is an extraordinarily powerful concept that could only be proved by calling the practice out or getting the protagonists to prove it is not true.
    This task is now upon us all. A publication containing years of research on how to prove, call out, fix, and improve mining is now available in the following link: http://bit.ly/TZtgjO
    Understanding the effect on the global economy, considering the influence commodity prices have on global growth. Is it advisable that all who read this article read the new publication and demand your economic leaders to respond, considering the current economic conditions?
    Written by, Brendon Butler.
    Nov 3, 2012. 01:05 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    An insider guide to the Global Metal Commodities Market and what is about to happen to it that you don't know.

    Global Mining and Manufacturer’s Corporate Agendas
    Understanding the current base and precious metal mining industry is something that many people think they know. Mining is conducted in underground and surface mines, what more is there to know.
    Understanding there are two types of mining, would it be ‘historically’ plausible to think that global mining machinery manufacturers could restrict underground mining in order to increase the number of high sales value surface mining operations worldwide?
    It is a serious thought to think, considering that there are only really three dominating underground base and precious metal mining machinery manufacturers globally.
    My name is Brendon Butler and I have spent over seven years researching this very topic. It has seen me into jobs and self-funded research that has allowed me access to all relevant areas of research. I have spoken with regional manufacturer managers, mining contractor general managers, mine managers, project managers, many internationally experienced underground mining operators, manufacturer distributers, etc. In all of the interactions undertaken, not one person has said or implied that this topic is indeed incorrect. Many have said it does hold merit.
    If many industry members each understand that, there are fundamental inefficiencies in the mining industry. Then how has the underground mining industry still been allowed to be restricted, and who may have supported it? Legitimate questions to be asked and answered.
    The complexities of this topic need to be understood in a global scale. If you restrict underground mining (where most high value ore is located) then you essentially lock that supply away. This in turn increases the value of the metals globally (over many decades) thus increasing the number of surface mining operations using large efficient mining equipment.
    High commodity prices would benefit the manufacturers that make the underground mining equipment, the surface mining equipment and the exploration mining equipment. However, because this may have been slowly played out over many decades, it will have also increased the margins made by mining companies on the value of metals sold.
    It is an extraordinarily powerful concept that could only be proved by calling the practice out or getting the protagonists to prove it is not true.
    This task is now upon us all. A publication containing years of research on how to prove, call out, fix, and improve mining is now available in the following link: http://bit.ly/TZtgjO
    Understanding the effect on the global economy, considering the influence commodity prices have on global growth. Is it advisable that all who read this article read the new publication and demand your economic leaders to respond, considering the current economic conditions?
    Written by, Brendon Butler.
    Nov 3, 2012. 01:04 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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