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Brian Marckx, CFA

 
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  • Turnaround Strategy Being Implemented At Competitive Technologies [View article]
    I don't have proof that he has a PhD. I don't regularly verify the educations of developers of technologies that I cover and I don't see the relevance of your statement. Whether he does or does not (and I have no reason to believe that he does not), I don't think that has any relevance as to "proving" or "disproving" the efficacy of Calmare - I certainly do not ascribe any potential for Calmare to Marineo. Efficacy will be evaluated in clinical studies.
    Mar 14 09:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Turnaround Strategy Being Implemented At Competitive Technologies [View article]
    Yes I have read the latest 10-Q and I am very familiar with their financial situation - which I mention is not good. And I also mention that their financial performance has been bad - so both those points I've already made.

    As far as Calmare being "approved" - it's not "approved" - it's 510(K) cleared. Will PMA approval necessarily translate into insurance reimbursement? - no, not necessarily. But it will necessitate compelling clinical evidence and reimbursement is much more likely to follow. It's obvious CMS and private payers weren't going to pay with the clinical data to-date - Mir's game plan certainly makes more sense than to try and sell in the current reimbursement environment.

    As far as the cost per treatment, it's not $500 - it's about $150 per treatment on average. Maybe some clinics are offering it for $500 but that's nowhere near the avg.

    As far as current reimbursement, Medicare does pay for Calmare treatment - granted it's spotty at best and nowhere near $150 - both of which I mention. As far as you knowing every private insurers policy towards Calmare - I doubt it. But again, I acknowledge that it's insignificant - making your point even less significant.

    As far as $8M in revenue in 2018, that's not unrealistic particularly with future compelling clinical data. As I note - a very small TENS manufacturer ramped revenue very quickly in a short period of time. That includes revenue growing from $2.6M to $8.0M in one year (then $11M, $19M, $24M, $34M...).

    Thanks for reading and all your points - although I think I already covered all of them before you made em!
    Mar 13 04:35 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Scrutiny Over Medical Device Safety Offers Opportunity For VeriTeQ [View article]
    One more reason there could be add'l interest in VTEQ's tech for breast implants.

    Also one more impetus for countries to implement national breast implant registries.
    Feb 24 11:31 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Put Corgenix On Your Radar [View article]
    Eric - yea just being a micro-cap keeps CONX either under the radar or off-limits of most investors. I think there has been growing interest in the company though. Just the increased participation on earnings calls is perhaps indicative of greater interest and if the financials continue to improve, there will undoubtedly be even more interest in the company.
    Feb 24 09:19 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • BioLife Solutions Posts Another Record Year With Revenue Up 58% [View article]
    More shares will be issued with the debt conversion. As far as the RS, it's not uncommon for the share price to languish afterwards. It's an easier exit for those that were waiting to. But, BLFS did it to uplist and I think very legitimately so. This wasn't a RS so insiders could get out quick and then watch the stock tank.
    Feb 20 11:44 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Scrutiny Over Medical Device Safety Offers Opportunity For VeriTeQ [View article]
    Thanks for the comment.
    I fully expect the company will be cash flow negative and need to raise a fairly substantial amount of add'l capital over the next few years. That doesn't necessarily mean it has to come from one investor or mean the company has to be bought for current shareholders to see a positive return. My model assumes they sell new equity on an ongoing basis. Lots of companies run in the red for years prior to becoming profitable and generating positive cash flow. Will VTEQ eventually turn cash flow positive? I don't know. There's a lot of risk that d/n happen - just as there's a lot of risks with almost any development stage or early revenue stage co.
    Feb 14 02:09 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Several Catalysts To Reignite Growth At LED Medical [View article]
    Thanks John, I appreciate the comments!!!!
    Jan 27 10:03 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rockwell Steadies Itself For A Phase III Run-Up [View article]
    Slack,

    Yeah to answer that question involves a much bigger exercise and involves modeling RMTI. I don't formally cover the company anymore so I don't model it. An SFP-failure scenario doesn't require a model.

    Keep in mind though, even if the CRUISE studies hit the endpoints, there's still a lot of risk that SFP doesn't get FDA approved. I would expect the stock would react favorably though if the study results are positive - so if you're trading on the hope of positive results....
    Jun 28 02:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rockwell Steadies Itself For A Phase III Run-Up [View article]
    Yes, link below to the Ph IIb results.

    http://1.usa.gov/16Eivw3
    Jun 28 08:43 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rockwell Steadies Itself For A Phase III Run-Up [View article]
    Bite you're right about the cc. According to clinicaltrials.gov the primary endpoint was never changed (still is mean change from baseline). There's a secondary endpoint that's decrease in Hgb of >/= 1.0.

    http://1.usa.gov/1cqxmvj

    http://1.usa.gov/1cqxmvn
    Jun 27 10:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rockwell Steadies Itself For A Phase III Run-Up [View article]
    Kory - CRUISE primary endpoint has always been mean change from baseline. I think some people may be confusing the various studies. Ph IIb used a primary endpoint of a drop in Hgb of 1.0 or more - which was a disaster. Ph IIb used a secondary endpoint of change from baseline - which, interestingly (or perhaps suspiciously), is being used as the primary endpoint in CRUISEs.
    Jun 26 12:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rockwell Steadies Itself For A Phase III Run-Up [View article]
    Bitesize,

    The Phase IIb was a 6-month trial, the CRUISE studies are 12-months. I think the longer length may benefit efficacy, particularly if mgmts. theories about protocol violations in Ph IIb are valid.

    The primary endpoint in CRUISE is not 0.5 g/dl decrease in Hgb. It's a statistically significant mean change from baseline between control and treatment - which is the same endpoint that was missed at every dose except one in Ph IIb.

    PRIME was a separate study focused on ESA reduction, not on maintaining Hgb.
    Jun 26 09:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • PST Launch, A New Inflection Point For Interleukin Genetics [View article]
    So you're saying BTIG is a bucket shop?
    The fact is that ILIU needed to raise money and they did - terms of the deal were not necessarily unfavorable to ILIU, particularly given their situation - they're a tiny company with low volume, were in a position where they needed $ immediately and were in a tight spot with their credit line.
    Clearly there's risk that ILIU may not eventually be profitable - it's a $14MM MC company trading at $0.40 - that risk already seems well baked in.
    Jun 24 03:20 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • PST Launch, A New Inflection Point For Interleukin Genetics [View article]
    The financing certainly had the effect of significantly increasing the share count. Importantly the company was able to raise a lot of $ when they needed to - whether they were going to be able to do so and avoid the impending liquidity crunch was a big question mark prior to the financing. They raised at $0.2745/share and the stock price has held up well since - which I think is indicative of the potential of PST. As you indicated, their prior commercialized products have not been successful enough to self-support the company - PST, with insurance reimbursement could be significantly more successful than their other tests, however.
    Jun 24 11:31 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Rockwell Steadies Itself For A Phase III Run-Up [View article]
    slack,

    I think if SFP fails the stock is sub-$1.00. The only reason the stock trades as high as it does now and the reason RMTI was able to sell equity at $3.00 is the potential for SFP. In my opinion, there's almost no value in the company without SFP. Calictriol - I think best case scenario is that calcitriol might add $0.09 in annual EPS at peak sales - which isn't enough to get them to positive EPS even with totally eliminating R&D. Although RMTI may be able to eke out positive cash flow if they completely eliminate R&D (if, for instance SFP fails and they attempt to regroup), management has demonstrated a very unfriendly shareholder attitude that includes paying themselves hefty stock compensation - which leads me to believe the company will continue to generate net losses indefinitely if SFP fails.
    Jun 21 08:40 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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