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Chumpmenudo

 
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  • Catching Up With The DGI Lite DiviDogs [View article]
    How did the Dog returns compare to your real IRA portfolio? Or shouldn't I ask.....

    Chump
    Aug 12 06:49 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Catching Up With The DGI Lite DiviDogs [View article]
    Thanks for the update Miz, seems like your strategy works pretty well.

    Take care,

    Chump
    Aug 12 06:06 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investors - Mind Your Own Business [View article]
    Good answer Eddie, I can tell you probably struggle with the same dilemma ;-) Since I started using FASTGraphs a few years ago now, my selling decisions have gotten much better. When a position get large in my portfolio due to a long period of good performance, I no longer automatically trim, or "cut the flower." I repeat the valuation I performed when buying originally, and see if its now "dangerously" overvalued. If not, then I let it go. In my current "rules" I trim down to a full or 2/3 size position if I think the valuation gets dangerous...that way I can avoid inevitable seller's remorse. But if its a great business, I plan never to close the position entirely....

    Chump
    Aug 12 12:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investors - Mind Your Own Business [View article]
    Hello Eddie:

    This was another great article, I wish you'd publish more frequently!

    Your article highlights a dilemma for me; I agree about buying great businesses, and always try to do so. But on the other hand, do you think it's possible to grow too attached to your great business? Looking at your KO example, it seem obvious (with my 20/20 hindsight) that the company's valuation got way out of whack back in very late 90's reaching a PE of over 45, and then went into a long period of price correction. If KO's PE got anywhere near that high today, I'd be a seller of my great business! I try not to grow too attached to my investments so I can evaluate them rationally, but it can be very difficult with stocks that have performed well for me (WAG comes to mind).

    Best,

    Chump
    Aug 11 09:00 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Champions: 11 Increases Expected By The End Of September [View article]
    Thank you David.

    Chump
    Jul 18 02:24 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • You Are Responsible For Your Investing Decisions [View article]
    Miz:

    I think everyone is born with drive, but it just needs to get "triggered" or "turned on." I loved Eddie's story, David C's (BTW, I thought David's father with Big Tom at Callahan's!?), and yours above. All demonstrate strength of character, drive, and persistence. But where did it come from? In my case, it got "turned on" when I was around 12 years old. My family lived on a modest teacher's salary, and while we had enough for the basics and lived a fine childhood, it became clear to me that I'd need to earn money if I wanted to buy any "stuff," so I started working. Paper routes before school, snow removal, mowing lawns, etc. If I wanted a thing, I simply worked and saved for it.

    In high school, my parents made it clear that there was very little money for college, so I'd better figure something out. I worked and saved through high school, went to a decent community college for my first two years, then transferred to a good four year college and studied engineering. I worked throughout college in difficult jobs; block mason's laborer, landscaping (digger), semi-trailer loader at UPS, and house painter. I made a good chunk of money and funded the whole thing myself.

    I don't think I'd have developed the work ethic I have today had I not needed to become self reliant at a fairly young age. I think we do a disservice to kids today by giving them too much, and in come cases, I think the same applies to adults.

    Chump
    Jul 5 02:04 PM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • You Are Responsible For Your Investing Decisions [View article]
    David, I have to say your photo reminds me of one of my favorite actors...less the glasses

    http://bit.ly/1t6ikso

    Just messin' with you.

    Chump
    Jul 4 01:12 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • You Are Responsible For Your Investing Decisions [View article]
    Dave, like you, I'm pretty immune to advertising, except of course for the Sham-wow, that thing is awesome! But most of my elderly relatives definitely are not. And unlike ads for golf products, cars, appliances, drugs, which all give you a pretty straight forward benefit, or at least do little harm, financial products tend be a very bad idea almost universally, and can be downright devastating for many. Spend a day in front of CNBC, and you're told to become a day trader, put all your money into gold/silver, buy "safe" fixed annuities, take out a reverse mortgage, insure your pets with valuable whole life policies, and and buy lakefront property in Costa Rica, and that's just in first half hour!

    Caveat emptor indeed!

    And yes, the community here at SA is an incredible resource for like minded folks to bounce around ideas and strategies, certainly the best, and perhaps only, of its kind.

    Chump
    Jul 3 01:35 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • You Are Responsible For Your Investing Decisions [View article]
    David:

    I enjoyed this article, thank you. I completely agree with your comments and theme of self reliance, but I do have sympathy for the many who fall prey to bad investment advice. The world of finance is seriously stacked against making smart financial decisions, and its very tough for most folks to know who to trust if they lack the tools themselves. Possibly a good topic for another article ;-)

    Best,

    Chump
    Jul 2 07:17 PM | 11 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Weighing The Week Ahead: Is The Fed Behind The Curve? [View article]
    Hello Jeff, thanks for another great article. I especially liked your summary statements. A sidebar question, I think appropriate for you due to love of data: I notice in your first chart the S&P YTD performance is listed as 6.20%, through this past Friday I assume. I track my portfolio vs. the S&P 500 weekly, but find that few financial outlets are in sync with regard to S&P year to date performance. For example, Morningstar says the S&P is up 7.24% through Friday, with dividends reinvested. Can you suggest a reliable source for up to date S&P performance data?

    Thanks,

    Chump
    Jun 23 06:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • I Have No Fear Of A Market Crash Or A Significant Correction, Here's Why: Part 1 [View article]
    Chuck:

    Thank you for another well written article, and the supreme patience and constraint you continue to exhibit.

    Kind regards,

    Chump
    Jun 16 04:55 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Great Correction Of 2014: Be Prepared To 'Buy The Dip' [View article]
    You were very lucky dolph...I had a similar background, but I never had "that" teacher, for me it was a colleague at my first job who asked if I would be interested in joining an investment club....
    Jun 10 04:41 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Great Correction Of 2014: Be Prepared To 'Buy The Dip' [View article]
    "it is a shame that so many people think the market is rigged or that their money is safer in a bank account. But it is easy to see why with so much conflicting information and so many articles telling investors they must act now in this direction or that."

    So true. The shame is that our schools don't teach basic financial planning strategies, and that most parents don't have these basic skills to pass along to their children. How many Americans do you think know what "ETF" stands for? I would guess maybe one in one thousand, perhaps fewer.
    Jun 10 03:55 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Great Correction Of 2014: Be Prepared To 'Buy The Dip' [View article]
    BHN, sounds like you have a solid plan. I already own JNJ, MDT, and OHI for healthcare exposure....and have BDX on my watch list. I own KO and MCD, but would add PEP and YUM in a downdraft. I guess by "tech" I mean old tech. I own IBM, CSCO, INTC and more recently T. Oh, and AAPL. Now that I'm writing this I realize I'm pretty heavy in old tech....might have to trim a bit.

    So are you holding cash in anticipation of the next correction? For what its worth, I have my IRA almost fully invested (DGI), and my taxable account at about 30% cash, the rest in HGYL, high quality names. I figure I need to protect my taxable account, and can make some strategic buys in a correction, and can weather the downdraft in my IRA by waiting it out....
    Jun 10 03:41 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Great Correction Of 2014: Be Prepared To 'Buy The Dip' [View article]
    BHN:

    I just read your bio, wow, you should turn that into an article ;-) Regarding your holdings, not that you care what I say, but I wish you'd diversify a bit away from mREIT and MLP...maybe add a little more technology, healthcare and consumer....

    T is a buy right now, and would fit in nicely as an MYMG. I think of it as a utility with a bit more growth potential.

    Best,

    Chump
    Jun 10 02:23 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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