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Dale Roberts

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  • Are Bond Funds Riskier Than Bonds? [View article]
    Hey Gratian, somewhat in that camp as well of course. Looking to simply add my income into Dividend Growth ETFs and take what the market gives me. I would welcome a decent correction.

    Thanks for your update.
    Nov 9 03:02 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Daily State Of The Markets: Things Don't Matter Until They Do, But Then... [View article]
    Mr. Market usually wears Rose Coloured Glasses. And he can't see very well.
    Nov 9 09:16 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Grand Bargain: 8 Factors That Could Drive A Surprise On The Deficit [View article]
    would add. it takes some 30 cents of every dollar of profit to comply with the perverse tax code. that's an immediate productivity boost when the tax system becomes sensible and simple.

    yes a lot of accountants and book keepers would be out of work. but an necessary evil.

    you could also send home a few hundred thousand IRS workers.
    Nov 9 08:55 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Are Bond Funds Riskier Than Bonds? [View article]
    And great article, thank you for that.
    Nov 9 07:33 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Are Bond Funds Riskier Than Bonds? [View article]
    From what I've read, bond funds usually do not react to interest rate increases as per the formula - avg duration x rate increase.

    And longer bond funds are not as volatile as one might expect.

    All said I am happy to be on the shorter side, and in a laddered product. As Robert points out, fund holders can benefit from bonds with greater income being added into the fund. As per reinvesting in dividend growth stocks, stay the course, one can purchase some 'rising' income.

    For now I have to watch my bond fund income drop, as my dividend income increases.
    Nov 9 07:32 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Grand Bargain: 8 Factors That Could Drive A Surprise On The Deficit [View article]
    The US actually needs to cut spending and raise revenues. The basic foundation of the 'deal' is in the right direction. Painted into a corner there really is no choice.

    Government spending is 50% waste at least. The tax code is a joke. It would be an easy fix. But politicians have to complicate everything and put their own interests ahead of the general public.

    In Canada we eliminated a very similar defict (level) in three-four years. ELIMINATED. Went to surplus.

    With just a modicum of political will. And it was our Liberals who did it, not the Conservatives. The only thing the Liberals ever did right. Ha.
    Nov 9 07:11 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Grand Bargain: 8 Factors That Could Drive A Surprise On The Deficit [View article]
    Hi James, great article, as always. There is likely a good chance that Obama will find some form of fiscal sanity.

    In Ontario our Premier turned on the unions after he 'returned the favour' after receiving their significant political support and money. He doubled the provincial debt in two terms, while he tripled the $100k government payrolls. Add in two largest tax increases in Ontario history. Yikes.

    After getting elected a third time (go figure), he turned on them. Nothing to lose.

    He recently resigned in a scandal or three but that's another story. Ha.

    Obama may follow the same pattern.
    Nov 8 09:32 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    Ha, thanks Bob. I will certainly read your articles on Canadian banks. I am writing one the real estate comparions, between US and Canada, as I have some interesting perspective from my banker 'pals'.

    Sounds like your Canadian stocks have served you very well. Thanks for stopping by. I am now off to the world of flimflam, not to be confused with flin flon Manitoba.

    Have a great one.
    Nov 8 07:23 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    hey georgekern. that would be a great selection. In fact that should be in the article. it's a great idea imho to buy Canada. And that's a great way to do it. There is also currency risk or advantage.

    US citizens who invested in Canada directly over the last couple of decades would also add a 50% currency advantage or gain.

    With the US printing money around the clock and the deficit not even addressed, perhaps some currency hedging is in order?

    Thanks for the comment. Best of luck.
    Nov 8 07:14 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    Thanks for that. I have a few other articles approved and awaiting the submit button.

    Will likely finish Canadian Real Estate within a week or so. I will make a note and send you the link.
    Nov 7 07:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    I just checked your portfolio and saw that you have 0 financials?

    Likely wise for US investors to consider buying them direct as well for some Canadian currency exposure, given the election results and round the clock money printing and all ...
    Nov 7 06:35 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    Thanks Chowder. Actually Royal bailed on the US. TD is doing quite well in the US. They have tons of cash and can pick up some (more) nice additions. They have a strong brand and purpose as well.

    I think it's a great hedge. Perhaps the US does recover and TD and others go along for the ride (growth).

    How many Canadian banks can I put you down for to add to your dividend growth portfolio? I know you like that 12% dividend CARG mention.
    Nov 7 06:30 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    Hey djohnsonhot, thanks for the links. The guest writer at Zero Hedge obviously has a very very topline and shallow understanding of Canada and the Canadian real estate market. Looks like he read a few articles and googled his desired subject matter, and conclusion.

    I am writing an article on this, but will do my due diligence and conduct a fair amount of research and critical thinking. I have access to some very open, honest, and worst case scenarios research from the banks. I will also balance that by reading those who think the worst. I will look for valid comparisons in other countries.

    Comparing to the US is not very useful. On real estate it's apples and oranges. Due to the profile of those who borrow (Current Canadian (or Chinese) and the US borrower from 2003-2008.

    A segment of the Chinese pay cash - they have no mortgage.

    A correction is underway. Is it contained to the two or three pockets, we'll see. Will it be a soft landing?

    Thanks again.
    Nov 7 06:26 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    Hi Klarsolo, because those are great stories or examples. And they teach us that Patience is perhaps an investor's greatest virtue. Though putting all of your money in one stock would not be recommended by any financial advisor, that is for certain.

    And of course the article lands on potentially selecting or researching the Big 6 or a few that meet the selection criteria of the individual investor j- and add them into your portfolio if you so choose. Some Dividend Growth Investors will cut a company at the first dividend stall. That is up to them.

    I personally held only two for a decade or more -- TD and Scotiabank. They were part of a basket of dividend growth stocks. And they served me very very well as you can see from the performance outlines.

    These would likely be a great addition to the equity componenet of any portfolio. Earnings growth, dividend growth, attractive underlying long-term fundamentals in Canada.

    Short term, I have no idea like everyone else on the planet.

    Well except for Peter Schiff. Ha.
    Nov 7 06:08 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The One Stock Portfolio [View article]
    Hey Cash Cow, thank you for the compliments and insults. I must say, I more enjoyed the later, I'm a sucker for dark humour.

    Of course I am suggesing US investors look at Canadian banks as a sector to add to their equity or overall portfolio mix. They are classic Dividend Growth companies that prove how (and to the extent) that that strategy can work.

    As per my psychological composition I am lucky that I married a social worker I guess.

    From an investor psychographic category standpoint I would certainly be more of what's known as a Preserver, with shades of Gatherer.

    Remember I did quite well from 2007-2011. I took a lot of profits off the table, in case Peter Schiff is still right ha. My 5% plus portfolio income is largely reinvested into a dividend/dividend growth etf, as I search for the best US DG etf or basket of companies, to also build positions in.

    Canadian banks will continue to play a large role in getting us to the finish line.
    Nov 6 03:24 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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