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Dan Rayburn

 
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  • Amazon Gets More Competitive With Announcement Of Custom SSL Support For Static And Dynamic Content Delivery [View article]
    "dedicated servers" have nothing to do with running services in the cloud. and amazon wasn't offering any web services in 2000.
    Jun 12, 2013. 05:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon Gets More Competitive With Announcement Of Custom SSL Support For Static And Dynamic Content Delivery [View article]
    I am not a wall street money manger or a financial analyst. I track technologies. Amazon's earnings for the last quarter or two have nothing to do with new functionality they have announced.
    Jun 12, 2013. 05:51 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Akamai: Platform Already Delivers 20% Of All Web Traffic And Will Continue Growing [View article]
    There are a lot of comments made in this post as facts, which are really opinions. But the bigger point is that you don't define the word "performance". Customers measure performance very differently, for different services, and in different verticals. There is no agreed upon standard in the market for how "performance" is measured.

    "The upside is that many have tried to compete against Akamai for years, and Akamai still managed to keep its price premium safe."

    That's not accurate. The company has said for nearly two years now that they have had to lower pricing, on large media deals. Also, the whole reason they bought Cotendo was that Cotendo was forcing them to reuduce their pricing on high-margin value add services.

    "The downside is that having many data centers all over the world is currently a competitive advantage hard to beat"

    Who are you referencing? Akamai does not have data centers and most telcos only have regional data centers, not ones located all over the world.

    "Maybe a new way (either a protocol or algorithm or something else) to accelerate the web will appear."

    Companies arent' "accelerating the web", they are accelerating applications delivered over the web.

    "Not surprisingly, Limelight's stock has also performed worse than Akamai Technologies. This shows that the market is well aware of who is the best in terms of performance."

    Akamai's stock has done better as the company is profitable, has a lot of cash in the bank, continues to grow and usually acheives guidance. That has nothing to do with the "performance" of their network, something the "market" doesn't even measure.

    You can't reference the data from the paper in 2008. CDNs change so much each year, let alone from 5 years ago. Both Limelight and Akamai's network's look much different today and you can't compare performace from one company to another, from a high level. You can only compare it based on a specific set of measurement data, for a particular customer, for a specific service.

    All CDNs have good days and bad days, Akamai is no exception. Akamai's website was down for hours yesterday, so all CDNs do have problems at times.

    "the demand for Akamai network will continue increasing".

    Akamai does not sell "network", Akamai has services they sell that run over their network. You're not using many of the phrases correctly in this article.

    "The more servers you have in your network and the more locations you cover, the more efficient your CDN will be."

    Do you have factual data to back that up? The performance of content being delivered over any network is due to many factors, not just the number of locations you place servers OR the number of servers you have. So the statement, as your wrote it, is not factual.

    "And Akamai is already very big. Too big to be reached by a small startup."

    Define "reached". Cotendo was a small srartup, about $25M in funding and in under 3 years they put so much pressure on Akamai that Akamai acquired them for about 10X revenue. So the idea that no small company can impact Akamai is not accurate.

    Akamai has a lot of strengths. Brand, awareness of that brand in the market, profitability, cash in bank, size of sales force amogst other things. But they also have risks to their business, and over the past two years, the growth of their business has slowed, the volume of traffic growth on their network has slowed and the company gets beaten to the market with new products and services by those who are faster and more nimble. No competitor will displace Akamai's revenue, customer count or volume of traffic served, but Akamai's still has to work very hard to grow their business and vague statements about the "performance" of their network aren't accurate, nor relevant.

    All that matters is how a specific customer defines performance, measures it, and what they are willing to pay for that service.
    Jun 11, 2013. 02:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Streaming Video Can't Scale At Cable TV Quality, Will Never Replace Traditional TV Distribution [View article]
    HEVC is 5+ years away.

    Any video technology touches many components as it travels from glass to glass, such as cameras, NLE systems, video indexing systems, statistical multiplexers, satellite transponders, head-ends and (perhaps most importantly) CPEs. Similarly on the OTT side, transcoders, file formats, streaming protocols, streaming servers, content protection systems, network optimization platforms and end devices all need to support HEVC before an end to end solution becomes broadly viable.

    It will take many years before all of these pieces of the video ecosystem can support HEVC and provide a real solution.
    Jan 15, 2013. 10:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Streaming Video Can't Scale At Cable TV Quality, Will Never Replace Traditional TV Distribution [View article]
    "the title is a ridiculous assertion that will be proven wrong in a few short years."

    That's what the NY Times article said five years ago. Didn't happen. Each year that goes by, people say "in a few years" it will change. And then they say it year after year. Over and over.
    Jan 15, 2013. 10:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Streaming Video Can't Scale At Cable TV Quality, Will Never Replace Traditional TV Distribution [View article]
    Define "revoluntion"? If less than 1% of the market has cut cable, over a multi-year period that's not revolution. Sports will not be streamed online, live, with no blackouts, for a cheap price. Why would they do that? All of the sports leagues sell their content to broadcasters for billions. Why would they do that to then put it on the Internet and make far less money? There is no business value to them doing that.
    Jan 15, 2013. 10:24 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Streaming Video Can't Scale At Cable TV Quality, Will Never Replace Traditional TV Distribution [View article]
    Too many people want to disagree by saying things like "soon", "shortly", "in a few years" etc. it yet it doesn't happen. The reality is that year after year, the advances that people predict will take place don't happen.

    Just look at the all in one Apple TV, the product does not even exist, yet some analusts have been saying for 5 years it coming "next year". Just one example of many.
    Jan 15, 2013. 10:22 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Streaming Video Can't Scale At Cable TV Quality, Will Never Replace Traditional TV Distribution [View article]
    And while Netflix gained 30M subscribers, cable/satellite providers combined haven't even lost 1M subscribers in any one year. Not even 1% of the market has cut cable. Netflix isn't a replacement for the majority.
    Jan 14, 2013. 09:49 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Gene Munster's Apple TV Predictions And Data Are Seriously Flawed [View article]
    He's not a "colleague" of mine. I am not Wall Street money manager paid to give out stock advice.
    Aug 14, 2012. 11:06 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Gene Munster's Apple TV Predictions And Data Are Seriously Flawed [View article]
    And I never will help you make - or lose money. I'm not a Wall Street money manager that is paid to give out stock advice.
    Aug 14, 2012. 11:05 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gene Munster's Apple TV Predictions And Data Are Seriously Flawed [View article]
    I'm not a Wall Street money manager, I don't make these kinds of predictions.
    Aug 14, 2012. 11:04 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Netflix: Open Connect Will Likely Fail [View article]
    Terrible article. Where's your data to back up your argument as to why "Open Connect Will Likely Fail"? You give no technical, business or competitive reasons as to why it might not work.

    The quality of the content on Seeking Alpha continues to decline.
    Jun 19, 2012. 10:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Redbox, YouTube, Netflix, Apple, And The Future Of Content Dissemination [View article]
    More articles from people who have clearly never used the platforms they are writing about or else they would never say"

    "We think Apple is the biggest threat to both Hulu and Netflix, in that iTunes is so much easier to use than both of the their services."

    With Netflix you login once and click one button to start the movie playing. How is Apple's iTunes easier than that? It isn't. Hulu and Netflix are as easy as you can get, iTunes is easy too, but to say it is "easier to use than Netflix" is wrong. There are no facts to back that up and any real user of these services knows that.
    Jun 11, 2012. 05:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Light At Limelight Networks Darkens - Soon To Go Pitch Black? [View article]
    I find it interesting to see this post show up the night before Limelight's earnings, by someone who won't use their name and has never written any other articles on SeekingAlpha.com. Clearly a red flag.

    Also, Brightcove never competed with Limelight, they re-sold Limelight's CDN until Limelight decided to compete with Brightcove by acquiring Delve Networks, a cloud based online video platform, which was in the same market as Brightcove. So the author has that backwards.

    Brightcove is not a "value-add CDN" as Brigthcove's owns nothing network related and re-sells CDN services from other companies.

    Also, anyone who has seen who these letters are going to will notice they are mostly small hosting companies and regional networks, not major ISPs. So the letters they are sending out aren't going to a large percentage of their ISP and peering partners and it's not going to companies who push a lot of traffic. Limelight even says in the letter that those they sent it to "no longer meets their minimum requirements". These aren't large networks.

    All of this is out there to see if you simply look at the details or talk to some of the folks who have gotten the letters, which it does not sound like the author has done.

    The author says, "the CDN market is technologically highly specialized", but it's not when it comes to video and the kind of volume traffic Limelight is pushing. It's become so commoditized that Limelight and all CDNs are trying to diversify into services outside of CDN as quickly as possible. If CDN was that sticky and "specialized" then CDNs would still be focusing on non-value add services.

    Also, I think if anyone is going to suggest a company is going to go under, it's a good idea to report how much cash they have on hand, which this author doesn't.
    May 2, 2012. 07:52 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Dish Network's Blockbuster Buy Is Paying Off [View article]
    The title says "how dish networks's blockbuster buy is paying off", but then you say in the post that it is, "too early to tell if the Blockbuster experiment will be a success." Which one is it?

    So how exactly is it "paying off"? They got 20,000 new subscribers, which is less than 1% of Netflix's total subscribers. And how many of those 20,000 subscribers are as a result of Blockbuster? There is no way to know.

    I don't see any actual hard data, numbers or proof of any kind to say that the blockbuster buy is "paying off".
    Mar 5, 2012. 07:09 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
248 Comments
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