Seeking Alpha

Dana Gardner's  Instablog

Dana Gardner
Send Message
Dana Gardner is president and principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions (www.interarbor-solutions.com), an enterprise IT analysis, market research, and consulting firm. Gardner, a leading identifier of software productivity trends and new IT business growth opportunities, honed his skills and... More
My company:
Interarbor Solutions, LLC
My blog:
Dana Gardner's BriefingsDirect
View Dana Gardner's Instablogs on:
  • Perfecto Mobile Goes To Cloud-Based Testing So Developers Can Build The Best Apps Faster

    We have surely entered a golden age of mobile apps development, not just for app stores wares, but across all kinds of enterprise and productivity applications. The notion of mobile-first has altered the development landscape so much that the very notion of software development writ large will never be the same.

    With the shift comes a need for speed, but not so much so that security and performance requirements suffer. How to maintain the balance between rapid delivery and quality assurance falls to the testing teams. Into the fray comes cloud-based testing efficiencies.

    Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Read a full transcript or download a copy.

    Our next innovation case study interview therefore highlights how Perfecto Mobile is using a variety of cloud-based testing tools to help its developers rapidly create the best mobile apps for both enterprises and commercial deployment.

    BriefingsDirect had an opportunity to learn first-hand how rapid cloud testing begets better mobile development when we interviewed Yoram Mizrachi, CTO and Founder of Perfecto Mobile, based in Woburn, Mass. The discussion is moderated by me, Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

    Here are some excerpts:

    Gardner: Tell us about the state of the mobile development market. How fast is it growing, and who are building mobile apps these days?

    Mizrachi

    Mizrachi: Everyone is building mobile applications today. We have not gone into a single company that doesn't have anything on mobile. It's like what happened on the web 15 years ago. Mobile is moving fast. Even today, we have customers with more transactions on mobile than any other channel that they're offering, including web or making calls. Mobile is here.

    Gardner: So that's a big challenge for companies that perhaps are used to a development cycle that took a lot longer, where they had more time to do testing and quality assurance. Mobile development seems to be speeding up. Is there a time crunch that they're concerned about?

    Mizrachi: Absolutely. In mobile there are two factors that come into play. The first one is that everyone today is expecting things to happen much faster. So everyone is talking about agile and DevOps, and crunching the time for a version from a few months, maybe even a year, into few weeks.

    Bigger problem

    With mobile, there's a bigger problem. The market itself is moving faster. Looking at the mobile market, you see hundreds of mobile models being launched every year. Apple is releasing many models. Android is releasing tremendous amount of new models every year. The challenge for enterprises is how to release faster on one side, but still maintain a decent quality on all the wide ranges of devices available.

    Gardner: So that's a big challenge in terms of coming up with a test environment for each of those iterations.

    Of course, we're also seeing mobile first, where they're going to build mobile, and it's changing the whole nature of development. It's a very dynamic and busy time for developers and enterprises. Tell us about Perfecto Mobile and how you're helping them to manage these difficult times.

    Mizrachi: Yes, it is mobile first. Many of our existing customers, as I mentioned, have more transactions on mobile than anything else. Today, they're building an interface for their customers starting from mobile. This means there are tremendous issues that they need to handle, starting with automation. If automation was nice to have on traditional web -- with mobile it's no longer a question. Building a robust and continuous automated testing environment is a must in mobile.

    Gardner: Now, we're talking about not only different targets for mobile, but we're talking about different types of applications. There's Android, Apple, native, HTML 5, Web, hybrid. How wide a landscape of types of apps are you supporting with your testing capabilities?

    Gardner: Tell us how you're doing this? I know that you are a software-as-a-service (SaaS) provider and that the testing that you provide is through a cloud-based model. A lot of organizations have traditionally done their own testing or used some tools that may have been SaaS-provided. How are companies viewing going purely to a SaaS model for their testing with their mobile apps?Mizrachi: When you look at the market today, mobile is moving very fast, and you're right, there are lots of solutions available in the market. One of the things that Perfecto Mobile is bringing to the market is the fact that we support them all. We support native, hybrid applications, Web services, iOS, Android, and any other platform. All of this is provided as a cloud service. We enable our customers to worry a little bit less about the environment and a little bit more about the actual testing.

    Mizrachi: The nice thing about what we do with cloud is that it solves a huge logistical problem for the enterprises. We're providing managed solution for those physical devices. So it's many things.

    One of them is just physically managing those devices and enabling access to them from anywhere in the world. For example, if I'm a U.S.-based company, I can have my workforce and my testing, located anywhere in the world without the need to worry about the logistics of managing devices, offshoring, or anything like that. Our customers are utilizing this cloud model to not change their existing processes when moving into mobile.

    ALM integration

    Gardner: And in order to be able to use cloud amid a larger application lifecycle, you must also offer application lifecycle management (NYSE:ALM) or at least integrate with ALM, source code management, and other aspects of development. How does that work?

    Mizrachi: Our approach was to not reinvent the wheel. When looking at the large enterprises, we figured out that the existing ALM solutions in the market, led by HP, is there, and the right approach is to integrate or to extend them into mobile and not to replace them.

    What we have is an extension to the ALM products in such a way that you, as a customer, don't have to change your existing processes and practices in order to move to mobile. You'll have a lot of issues when moving into mobile, and we don't believe that changing the processes should be one of them.

    Gardner: Of course with HP having some 65 percent of the market for ALM and a major market presence for a lot of other testing and business service management capabilities, it was a no-brainer for you to have to integrate to HP. But you've gone beyond that. You're using HP yourself for your own testing. Tell us how you came to do that.

    Mizrachi: HP has the largest market in ALM, and looking at our customers in Fortune 500 companies, it was really obvious that we needed to utilize, integrate, or extend HP ALM tools in order to provide a market with the best solution.

    One of the things I'm quite proud of is that we, as a company, have proof of success in the market, with hundreds of customers already using us and tens of thousands of hours of automation every month being utilized.Internally, of course, we're using the HP suites, including Unified Functional Testing (UFT) Performance Center, and Load Runner in order to manage our own development.

    We have customers with thousands of automated scripts running continuously in order to validate the applications. It's a competitive environment, obviously, but with Perfecto Mobile, the value that we're bringing to the table is that we have a proven solution today used by the largest Fortune 500 companies in finance, retail, travel, utilities, and they have been using us not for months, but for years.

    Gardner: Where do you see this going next? Is there a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) opportunity where we're going to do not just testing but development and deployment ultimately? If you are in the cloud for more and more of what you do in development and deployment, it makes sense to try to solidify and unify across a cloud from start to finish.

    Mizrachi: I'm obviously a little bit biased, but, yes, my belief is that the software development life cycle (SDLC) is moving to the cloud. If you want to go ahead, you don't really have a choice. One of the major failures in SDLC is setup of the environment. If you don't have the right environment, just in time, you will fail to deliver regardless of the tool that you have.

    Just in time

    Moving to the cloud means that you have everything that you need just in time. It's available for you. Someone has to make sure this solution is available with a given service-level agreement (NYSE:SLA) and all of that. This is what Perfecto Mobile is doing of course, but I believe the entire market is going into that. Software development is moving to the cloud. This is quite obvious.

    For our customers, the top insurance and top financial banks customers, healthcare organizations, all of them, security is extremely important, and of course it is for us. Our hosting solution is a SOC 2-certified solution. We have dedicated personnel for security and we make sure that our customers enjoy the highest level of privacy and, of course, security -- physical security, network security, and all the tools and processes in place.

    Mizrachi: We're enjoying the fact that our research and development center and HP's research and development center are close-by. So the development of the two products is very close. We have weekly or biweekly meetings between products and R and D teams in order to make sure that those two tools are moving together.Gardner: And, as we know, HP has been doing testing in the cloud successfully for more than 10 years and moving aggressively in that space early on.

    SDLC, as you mentioned, is a lifecycle. It's not only about one time testing; it's ongoing. And post-deployment, when moving into production, you need to see that what you're offering to the market on the real device is actually what you expect. That's extremely important.

    As the mobile market matures, organization are relying more on mobile to assure and increase their revenue. So making sure the mobile offering is up and running and meets the right key performance indicators (KPIs) on an ongoing basis is extremely important. The integration that we've made with BSM is utilizing an existing extremely mature product on the monitoring aspect and extending that with cloud-based real mobile devices for application monitoring.

    Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Read a full transcript or download a copy. Sponsor: HP.

    You may also be interested in:
    Jun 05 6:06 PM | Link | Comment!
  • SAP's Ariba Teams With EBay To Improve Rogue B2B Procurement For Buyers, Sellers And Enterprises

    It remains one of the last bastions of enterprise spend over which companies have little or no control. Yet companies have been loathe to tamper with how their employers and managers buy ad-hoc goods - known as indirect spend, shadow purchasing, or "spot buying."

    Now, SAP's Ariba cloud is bringing the best of flexible, innovative spot-buying practices into a more controlled and sanctioned process by teaming with eBay and its B2B marketplace for an integrated, yet dynamic, approach to those indirect purchases not covered by contracts and formal invoicing.

    Such scattered, and often unmonitored, spot buying amounts to 15 to 20 percent of a typical enterprise's total purchasing. And so it provides a huge opportunity for improvement, the type that cloud, big-data analytics, and a marketplace of marketplaces approach can best solve. [Disclosure: Ariba is a sponsor of BriefingsDirect podcasts.]

    The Ariba Networks Spot Buy service was announced today in Orlando at Sapphire by SAP CEO Bill McDermott. "The most intractable CEO issue of our time is complexity," McDermott said in a keynote address Tuesday. "It's getting worse and worse. We see a dream for a simpler SAP, and a simpler customer experience."

    Long before the Web, the Thomas Register or vertical industry buyers' catalogs were the mainstays for how many business goods were discovered and procured. There were often done with no contracts, no bids, and no invoices. A material or product was needed, and so it was bought and paid for - fast.

    The Web -- and especially Internet search - only increased the ability for those workers in need to find and buy whatever they had to to get their jobs done. Because these buys were deemed "emergency" purchases, or amounted to smaller total amounts, the rogue process essentially flew under the corporate radar.

    Under the new Ariba Networks Spot Buy service, major and public online marketplaces are brought into the procurement process inside of SAP and Ariba applications and services. eBay is the first, but Ariba expects to extend the process efficiency to other online B2B markets, said Joe Fox, Vice President of Business Network Strategy at SAP.

    Pilot program

    The new indirect procurement approach, which will operate as a pilot program between August and December this year, before general availability, will allow those buying through the integrated Ariba Network's Spot Buy services to use eBay's PayPal service to transfer and manage funding, said Fox.

    Consistently updated content about B2B goods (services support will come later) will be available to users inside of their existing procurement applications, including Ariba, SAP and later third-party enterprise resource planning (ERP) applications, explained Fox. The users can search inside their Ariba apps, including soon-to-be-delivered mobile versions, alongside of their traditional purchasing app services, he said.

    "It's consumerizing business," said Fox, adding that users gain convenience and access inside of procurement apps and processes while enjoying ad hoc flexibility and one-click, no-invoice payments from converged markets, catalogs and sanctioned search. Enterprises, on the other hand, gain a new ability to monitor spot buying, analyze it, and provide guidance and curation of what goods should be available to buy - and on what general terms. "It's the best of Web-based buying but with some corporate control," said Fox.

    The net net, said Fox, is that more unmonitored spending can fall under spot buying, even as some spot buying can move to more formal procurement where bids, negotiation and payment efficiencies such as dynamic discounting can play a role. What's more, analytics can be applied to a whole new area of spend, amounting to higher productivity over many billions of dollars of B2B spending per year worldwide.Eventually, as multiple marketplaces become seamlessly available to procurement apps users, deeper analysis - via SAP's HANA big-data infrastructure on which all Ariba apps and cloud services are being deployed - will allow business to determine if redundancy or waste indicates that the sourcing should be done differently.

    "We are not going to build any marketplaces," said Fox. "We are facilitating access - with controls and filters - to all the public and third-party content from various markets. It's basically unlimited appropriate content for buyers and seekers."

    These marketplaces will also allow those selling goods and products to gain improved access into the B2B environments (such as the SAP installed base globally) as a new way to go seller-direct with information and content about their wares. New business models and relationships are no doubt bound to develop around that.

    Fox said no other business app or procurement services providers have anything like the new offering, one that targets rogue and unmonitored buying by workers using open and aggregated mainstream markets for B2B goods.

    You may also be interested in:
    Jun 03 1:29 PM | Link | Comment!
  • Modern Supply Chains — How Innovative Sellers Engage Customers In Entirely New Ways

    The next BriefingsDirect case study interview explores the new face of customer engagement and procurement modernization by examining how MSC Industrial Supply is improving how they define and relate to their customers in the manufacturing sector.

    MSC has been using the Ariba Network to innovatively bolster customer engagements, and to provide new solutions to their customers based on increased collaboration, information flow and buying trends analysis.

    Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Read a full transcript or download a copy. Sponsor: Ariba, an SAP company.

    BriefingsDirect had an opportunity to uncover more about about such new, agile business services at the recent 2014 Ariba LIVE Conference in Las Vegas when we spoke to Erik Gershwind, President and CEO of MSC Industrial Supply in Melville, New York. The discussion is moderated by me, Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

    Here are some excerpts:

    Gardner: What procurement pressures are your customers facing? Why are they looking to change things? What's wrong with the status quo?

    Gershwind: Most of our customers are North American manufacturers. One of the sea changes that we have seen occur, particular since the 2008-2009 global recession, is if you look back for the past two decades, there was a heavy focus by procurement, supply chain, and finance organizations on price, on cost.

    Of course, that's still critically important, but since the 2008-2009 recession, businesses around the world, and certainly manufacturers in North America, now have a much greater awareness on the importance of cash flow and speed through the supply chain.

    That's probably the biggest thing that we've seen in the past few years. Our customers are telling us that speed of the supply chain, getting to market faster, so they can have more of their products into their customers' hands faster, is becoming a much bigger priority.

    Gardner: So to be swift, agile, and lean in the way you go to market requires that you look at your internal processes, and get lean there. Is that right?

    Gershwind: Dana, that's exactly right. Leaner supply chains turn into shorter lead times. Shorter lead times mean faster speed to market. And all of that requires really tight dependency from every single link in the supply chain.

    What we've found is that everything that's happening in our supply chain right now is driven by the end-user, what's happening with the customer, but that customer's needs are working their way back very quickly.

    And collaboration, which is enabled by technology, is making it critically important in order to be effective in leaning things out.

    Gardner: I certainly want to learn more about how you're modernizing procurement and bringing benefits, but first, tell us a little bit about MSC, for those of our listeners and readers who are not familiar with you.

    Gershwind: MSC is a distributor of industrial supplies. We sell over a million items, primarily into manufacturing or any maintenance environment. That could be anything from a safety glove, to an abrasive, to the most advanced metal cutting tools that are used in the manufacturing process.

    We exist so that we can help businesses focus on their business. We do that by ensuring that supply chains run smoothly. Our small part in that bigger mission is around taking the complexity, the obstacles, and the inefficiencies out of maintenance, repair, and operations (NYSE:MRO) materials.

    We were founded over 70 years ago in a tiny storefront on the lower East Side of Manhattan, and everybody at MSC, including myself, has been part of what's been an amazing growth story.

    We focus on anything that's an indirect part of a production process. So not the raw materials, not the direct stuff, but all of the other things that keep plants running. That's what we specialize in.

    Gardner: Another thing that's going on, in addition to business pressure to be lean and agile, are some technology improvements over the past several years. One of those is a topic of the day, a hot topic, big data and the analytics that you can derive from more and more types of content and gain more and more insight.

    How do you get information or acquire insights or analysis that can allow you to then bring better approaches to your customers in helping them be lean and efficient?

    Gershwind: Historically, when I look at the core assets of MSC as a distributor, there were three things I would highlight: our people, first and foremost; our inventory; and our distribution centers, our physical assets.

    What we're quickly realizing is that there's a fourth one that's every bit as important as the other three assets. That's information. You're absolutely right. With every transaction that occurs, especially because of technology now, there's learning in there.

    To answer your question, we're using technology to help us harvest that data, use it to drive improvements within our own four walls, but more importantly, with our customers and with our suppliers.

    I'll give you two examples of how we're employing technology. One is Ariba. Ariba is the perfect platform for connecting buyers and sellers. It's a network, but it's a network that leaves footprints. With every transaction, there's a footprint left behind that's waiting to be mined for operational improvements.

    Another example is our vending initiative. We at MSC will take a little piece of ourselves and put a vending machine on the plant floor of our customers to store tools and let them take responsibility for procurement. Certainly, one advantage is security and inventory optimization, but there is information to be mined in each one of those machines, and we're using that to help our customers.

    Gardner: Tell me about your history of working with Ariba. How long have you been doing it, and what are some of the chief benefits that you see in using Ariba's Network and various cloud-based services to conduct your own procurement and tighten up your own processes?

    Gershwind: MSC has been a seller on the Ariba Network for well over a decade. If you'll bear with me, I'll share a quick story, a trip down memory lane. One of our very first Ariba interactions was close to 15 years ago. One of our customers at the time, a big manufacturer, asked us if we could get up and running on the Ariba Network in less than a month's time.

    The three partners together -- the customer, MSC, and Ariba -- rolled up our sleeves. We had teams working on the same side of the table for a month straight. It was a great example of collaboration.

    And I still remember us huddled around the computer screen, waiting for that first transaction to go through. I'm proud to say that that customer relationship is one of the best we have still today.

    In terms of the benefits that we as a seller see, there are three things I would point to.

    Number one is certainly enhanced revenue growth. Number two is cost savings, because transactions are now done electronically. But I would call out the third one as the most important. Ariba is helping us collaborate. It's bringing business networking to happen faster, more efficiently, and more frequently. And those collaborations are resulting in innovations to our supply chains collectively and are driving improvements.

    Gardner: Erik, I'd like to return to this notion of the vending machines that, as you said, was an extension of your business into the actual physical plant of your customers. This reminds me of what happens in technology on the Internet. For big bundles of objects and data, rather than going from the server of the originator down to the individual user, we have what we call content delivery networks (CDNs), where we put those objects out as far toward the last mile as possible.

    It seems to me that this is an interesting development for physical goods, and you also, of course, get the data back on how they are used. Explain to me your rationale and how far you've taken this into the market, this concept of the extension of your physical distribution capabilities into the very physical plant of your customers.

    Gershwind: Vending and the idea of extending ourselves into our customers' supply chains is a critical element of fulfilling our mission of helping supply chains run more effectively.

    I'll share a quick example with you. This is a customer that uses vending machines for us. This customer has about 150 vending machines installed as part of an MSC system across 75 locations in North America, and that system is yielding tremendous benefits for them.

    Recently their MRO category manager was in New York and shared with me that at one site in Alabama, one of this company's locations, their people were doing a mile-long walk there and back just to get to a centralized storeroom and get a supply replacement or part of a tool.

    Think about that for a second, a mile walk. If somebody is doing that just once a day, and by the way, many are doing it multiple times a day, they're walking a marathon by the end of the month. So by bringing inventory closer to where work is getting done, this company is saving time and they are translating that time savings into real dollar savings.

    Gardner: I suppose there is also a common thread here with mobility, where people can use their mobile devices or smartphones to conduct businesses, activities, and processes and allow for check-offs, okays, and so forth, reducing that last mile and compressing the distance.

    It also reminds me of being able to, in a sense, cross organizational boundaries. They become fuzzy. Your organization is inside another, for example.

    Let's take this to a theoretical level. As we look three, four, or five years down the road, is the nature of buyer and seller changing? Are we really combining them into a common supply-chain ecosystem, where there isn't necessarily an adversarial relationship, but something different, more collaborative?

    Gershwind: Dana, you just hit the keyword. It's collaboration. The way we look at it, we're all part of one supply chain. There's no such thing anymore as "my" supply chain and "your" supply chain. It's one supply chain, and we are all interdependent parts of the one bigger supply chain. The reality is that we can't be effective without each other, and that's how business is going to be run. The beauty of Ariba, more and more, is that it's making that collaboration happen faster, more efficiently, and more effectively.

    Gardner: Now, what about the data, returning to that subject. It's okay with you to share data with Ariba and Ariba to share data with you. Then, we extrapolate that across industries, verticals, and go global. The amount of information we're gathering, even anonymized and private, gives us great insights. We can start to be more predictive. That is to say, you know your supply chain, what your customers will demand maybe quite a bit before, or we can identify risks when things go amiss, sooner rather than later.

    So do you have any thoughts about the future of analysis and intelligence when we apply it to the supply chain equation?

    Gershwind: It goes back to the idea that, as a distributor, we used to think of ourselves as being in the hard goods business, and of course, we still are, and always will be, but we're also in the information business.

    The biggest change and trend that I would point to is the idea that information is now being used beyond our own four walls. At MSC, we always did a fairly decent job of mining our own data for supply chain improvements, forecasting, and understanding what to purchase.

    What's now happening, and it all starts because of our customers' needs, that's working its way back through the supply chain, is data and information is now being used to help our customers, and even our suppliers run their businesses better.

    So the vending example I gave you is a great one. As I said, each one of those electronic transactions is a footprint. It's the same thing with our website. E-commerce now represents nearly 50 percent of MSC's revenues. Every single one of those transactions leaves behind little breadcrumbs that give us insights that we can then use and share with our customers and further back in the supply chain with our suppliers.

    Gardner: It seems to me, Erik, that it requires a third party like the Ariba Network to aggregate and bring intelligence to bear on this massive data. I know that they're leveraging the HANA platform from SAP more and more to do that sort of big-data analysis and intelligence gathering.

    How important is it for you to look at that third party and see them in a trusted fashion? Could you do this alone, and are there many other organizations that can fill the role like Ariba Network is?

    Gershwind: I don't think anybody can do it alone anymore. That's really the nature of the supply chain that we just talked about. What Ariba does is bring businesses together.

    Think of it as a virtual networking forum. It used to be that, in the old days, you were able to network when you got together maybe once a quarter. Ariba is letting that happen in real time, all the time.

    Are there others doing it? Maybe, but none that we trust more than Ariba. As I said, we've been doing it for well over a decade with them and we view them as an extension of ourselves into our customers.

    Gardner: We're about out of time, but let's look to the future. Do you have any ideas about what you'd like to see from your unique position in the supply chain business, in manufacturing, and in indirect goods? What would you like to see for the next revolution?

    Gershwind: The one thing I would point to that we haven't talked about is the opportunity that's sitting right in front of procurement and supply chain, when it comes to indirect materials. For the last decade or so, procurement has done a wonderful job cleaning up direct materials, getting clear line of sight, optimizing the supply chain, and taking cost out.

    Earlier this morning, in the general session, I referred to direct materials as the garage of the house, because everybody goes in, it's a high profile spot, everybody is in it, it's core to your operations, and it's gotten a lot of attention.

    Indirect materials is like the attic of your house. If it's anything like my attic, it's neglected, the light bulb hasn't been replaced. So it's dark and you can't see what's going on.

    What we do know is that today, sitting in North American businesses, is $145 billion of MRO inventory alone, let alone broader indirect materials. We also know that 70 percent of that is likely never to be used.

    So sitting in front of procurement is a $100 billion opportunity. It's not just the job of procurement, but all of us as a supply chain. It's sitting there waiting for us.

    Gardner: What do you mean? How do we attack this problem, clean up the attic, as it were? Do we need to have better inventory? Do we have just-in-time supply chain, ordering and fulfillment? What is it that we need to bring to indirect that's missing?

    Gershwind: There are three things that we want to bring to indirect procurement and get at the attic. Number one is looking for time. The natural bias is to focus on cost, but what we've come to learn with our customers who are doing it well is that, if you focus on time savings, the cost savings does follow. That's number one.

    Number two, we need light. We need light up there and we need to bring a flashlight with us. That flashlight is technology -- technology like Ariba. Use technology as the flashlight.

    And the third thing, and we've been hitting on it all morning here, is collaboration. Get another set of eyes. It's hard to see things by yourself. You can't be successful on your own. So bring partners in and help you attack that $100 billion.

    Gardner: So we are really talking about modernizing indirect procurement in ways that we have already established. We know these things work and we just have to establish the will and then bring it into that part of the business.

    Gershwind: That's it. It's about taking what we have already done in the garage and applying it to the attic. That's right.

    Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Read a full transcript or download a copy. Sponsor: Ariba, an SAP company.

    You may also be interested in:

    Disclosure: I have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours.

    May 16 2:12 PM | Link | Comment!
Full index of posts »
Latest Followers

StockTalks

More »
Posts by Themes
Instablogs are Seeking Alpha's free blogging platform customized for finance, with instant set up and exposure to millions of readers interested in the financial markets. Publish your own instablog in minutes.