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David Crosetti  

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  • The Dumbest Argument Against Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    Zug:

    Which "dividend list" are you referencing?

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 05:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dumbest Argument Against Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    Giorgio:

    I also used Fuji film most of the time. But Kodak ASA 100 was unmatched for color.

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 05:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dumbest Argument Against Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    Mike:

    I'll send you a private e-mail first!

    Since I'm a longer term investor, I don't really worry a lot about initial price fluctuations.

    If I buy something for $50 a share and it drops to $45 in the next six months, I don't get all freaked out. I may or may not buy more at the lower price, if the reasons I purchased in the first place are still valid.

    I tend to be very particular and when I'm not being particular is when I have my worst decision making.

    It's like the oils here. Tempting as all get out. But, what's the story behind the story? They might represent a better buy six months from now. I don't need to be in a hurry. The portfolio is "complete."

    Any completely new purchases would have to be special. In the meantime, reinvesting dividends makes sense to me and even adding to existing positions that have appreciated would make sense. If the fundamentals are still there.
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:42 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    RAS:

    Not a rocket scientist. But, I'm pretty good at math.

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:20 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dumbest Argument Against Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    Mike:

    Spot on.

    And the lesson at this point in time is that you don't need to be buying stocks at any price, with a DG portfolio.

    Some of my stocks are down ytd. Some are up. Net effect? I'm "up" for the ytd and my dividend income keeps increasing.

    I haven't bought anything in the last 6 months. Not a single stock. There is nothing out there right now that seems to be "compelling" in terms of a purchase.

    But, I'm not selling either.

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:19 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    RAS:

    You think it would be pretty simple, wouldn't you?

    I don't know what the "average" house payment is, but mine (mortgage) was $950 a month. The taxes and insurance was extra, on top of that. But, with the mortgage paid off, I'm $950 a month "to the good."

    Because I'm a senior, my state gives me an increased homeowner's exemption on my primary residence, so that cut my property tax on the house by 35%. Not a big number, but cut, nonetheless.

    Wife's car note was $400 a month. Mine was $250 a month. Those are now $650 a month in our pockets. Both cars have been well maintained and have lots of miles left in them.

    Getting rid of cable tv and going with an alternative internet provider is saving us $150 month.

    Do the math.

    It's known as expense control in light of shrinking revenues. My SS and dividend income from a taxable account and her salary gives us the ability to actually have more cash flow than when I was working.

    It's not rocket science.

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    I guess I could have made that a bit more clear.

    I wasn't referring back to you, but, in fact to him and his comment to you.

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:04 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    In retirement, I finally have "a lifestyle."

    When I was working, I didn't have the time to have a "lifestyle." I was to busy working and having to work with people that I would never have chosen to be my friends.

    Here's what should happen when you retire.

    First, the house should be paid for.

    Second, you should investigate the property tax advantages (if any) that your state has for retirees.

    Third, you need to have your prescription drugs culled from a list of the $4 and $10 list that Walmart et al provide.

    Fourth, you need to sign up for every senior discount program that's out there.

    Fifth, make sure the cars are paid for.

    Six, make sure that all the credit cards are paid off and you are on a cash basis with your expenses.

    Seventh, take the time for an hour workout every day. Sundays included. Walk around the block and build up until you can go a mile. Keep at it until you end up walking almost everywhere.

    Eight, see if your state offers free college classes for senior citizens. This lets you keep your mind active and lets you meet new friends to hang out with.

    Ninth. Get that bucket list completed and get off your ass. If you have always wanted to go to Australia, then freaking do it. Nothing could be worse than being in your death bed and thinking, "damn. I sure wish I would have gone to see the beaches in Queensland." (They are spectacular, by the way).

    Tenth. Take the time to love on your family. Bury the hatchets that you have collected over the years and suck it up. Even if you are "right" who cares? Wouldn't it be nice to have your kid hug you again and call you "dad?"
    Jul 31, 2015. 11:31 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    Ted: You seem to have forgotten that many blue blood dividend stocks in the financial sector went to zero or cut dividends in 2008-2009.

    Can you give us a list of those "blue blood dividend stocks?"

    Were they dividend payers or dividend growth companies?

    Still waiting on you EFT list.
    Jul 31, 2015. 11:21 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    Social Security payments are funded by the continual inflows from the Social Security taxes.

    That makes it seem like a typical Ponzi scheme, doesn't it?

    When that inflow dries up, then what? Oh, yeah, they do a story on "American Greed."

    Dave
    Jul 31, 2015. 11:18 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dumbest Argument Against Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    Rincon:

    Yeah, that's correct. But try telling that to the critic who uses Kodak as his "poster boy" for what's wrong with DGI.

    As the author points out, many of the stocks that critics like to use as examples aren't even DG stocks, but are often "stocks that happen to pay a dividend."

    There is a huge difference between the two.
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:23 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dumbest Argument Against Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    I may be fortunate in that I've never owned stock in a company that went bust.

    Maybe that's because I don't invest much in companies that I don't understand or know about their business model.

    In a "normal" portfolio of 30-35 companies, if the investor keeps a relatively balanced position for his holdings, one company going "bust" would represent a minor position in that portfolio.

    Besides, no one takes the time to actually investigate what happened to the investor who actually rode a Kodak all the way down to zero. You might want to spend some time investigating how that investor actually came out and you will be surprised at the end game.

    If you put 50% of your portfolio into one stock, you deserve what you get if the investment takes a powder on you.
    Jul 31, 2015. 01:17 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    RAS:

    I understand that an ounce of gold will always be an ounce of gold.

    But in and of itself, an ounce of gold has no intrinsic value.

    It's an ounce of gold.

    When we match the value of that ounce to a currency (pick one) then it has a "value" which can be measured. Until you do that, it's just a shiny piece of metal that happens to weigh one ounce.

    Hell, if it makes you happy, measure it against the Euro.
    Jul 30, 2015. 06:07 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    Ted:


    One might believe that, but how would he explain the spot price changes for gold, every day, changing the value of that ounce?

    Ignore the spot price changes?

    An ounce can be "worth" a thousand dollars today and eight hundred dollars tomorrow.
    Jul 30, 2015. 04:58 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    G:

    It was bound to happen. I expect a general "clean up" as someone we all know becomes offended by the comment stream and reports us.
    Jul 30, 2015. 04:25 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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