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David Stafford
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Student of markets, enjoys following their course.
My book:
Around the World in Several Pieces
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  • Friday Fancies; Beta Buffet

    As this friday approaches we're perhaps faced with a market thats in interesting shape per se. It seems as though world events, coupled with pretty decent price raising action per se in the none too distant past, has perhaps precipitated some downward action. With ye old Ebola virus hitting one of the most densely packed places on earth, namely Lagos, planes going down in the Ukraine, and planes going up per se over northern Iraq presumably, the global stage is looking a little crowded perhaps.

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    Nonetheless perhaps our betas will see us through this boondogle, but just as to each their own per se, hence it might be a good time to pull out the beta buffet, and hence to perhaps briefly look at some interesting stocks from varied betas per se, that all have dividend yields in the 3% or more range.

    (click to enlarge)

    source

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    Beta; High Yield Equities;

    DTH; WisdomTree DEFA High Yield Equity Fund

    Current Price; $46.85, Div. Yield; 5.34%

    I've been sort of interested in WisdomTree products per se, since I saw sort of a cool relative-strength related manner via which they managed one of their small cap funds. This gave me sort of a sense of intrigue per se, into their seemingly well thought out management style in some cases, and anyway this was a fund of their per se, that I came across had a decent div. yield. Perhaps its name is sort of self-expalantor in a sense, but it also has an interesting georgaphic profile per se, in so far as its investments/holdings are concerned. Namely, around 25% of the holdings are UK based if one will, while countries like France, and other Euro countries may hold out high positions in the holdings weightings per se, aswell. The US does not seem to be the center relatively speaking, of the national diversification profile of this portfolio, and hence it represents the home of a small percentage of the holdings of this fund, if one will.

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    Beta; "Reit";

    ARCP; American Realty Capital Properties

    Current Price; $12.90, Div. Yield; 7.75%

    This seems like a sort of relatively high yield fast food play if one will. This Reit has perhaps made waves recently for buying a portfolio of properties per se, pertaining specifically to fast food. Hence, this may not be a strictly "fast food Reit" if one will, however, perhaps if one wants some of that fast food beta per se, and a decent yield this might be a decent call.

    source

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    Beta; Silver;

    PAAS; Pan American Silver Corp.

    Current Price; $15.01, Div. Yield; 3.33%

    With precious metals looking interesting these days per se, especially given all the market shifts, perhaps it might be great to look at some silver stocks. Pan American apart from having kind of cool looking bullion usually depicting some sort of mining motif particularly on their rounds per se, also looks like an interesting silver stock play. Their div. yield is relatively good for the silver stock sector per se, at the 3.33% mark, and various silver stock commentaries have rated them as relatively well priced according to for example, price to ebitda. Hence, if one wants some silver-market action without the shipping, and sort of I guess opportunity cost potential related to storage than perhaps a stock with a yield that's at least above the "official" inflation rate is a good pick.

    source

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    Beta; Gold and other minerals;

    FCX; Freeport McMoran Gold & Copper;

    Current Price; $36.15, Div. Yield; 3.46%

    Freeport McMoran, though not exclusively a "gold miner" per se, is perhaps a pseudo-gold investment at least. It has a decent yield for the gold-miner-related sector per se, at 3.46%. However, perhaps its always wise to note the market cap, which for a large somewhat heralded corp. like Freeport is sort of quite large per se, so if cap is something one is keen of per se, in shaping one's portfolio one might want to at least be aware of its quite large market cap.

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    Beta; Heavy Industries

    SSUMY; Sumitomo Corp.;

    Current Price; $12.68, Div. Yield; 3.71%

    The world always needs heavy machinery per se, so perhaps these sort of companies are sort of relatively solid stand-by's if one will in general, perhaps like railroad companies, when their prices don't get to high, relatively speaking. Either way, Sumitomo has a decent yield here at about official inflation with 3.71%, so perhaps its a relatively decent yielding stock in this space per se. Perhaps another stock in this space that has a similar yield profile if one will, is "KWHIY"; Kawasaki Heavy industries; Price; $14.64, Div. Yield; 3.23%, but perhaps that up to one's own taste per se. It seems that Sumitomo is a sort of construction jack-of-all trades, in its own right, so perhaps this sort of diversification may lend a certain degree of stability to the stock in general. Either way these perhaps represent a couple of those interesting sort of Japanese corps. that are sort of big and diversified if one will(Sumitomo particularly).

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    Beta; Renewable/"Green"/Alternative Energy

    WFFIF; Waterfurnace;

    Current Price; $27.85, Div. Yield; 3.59%

    Waterfurnace seems to be a geo-thermal power company. Geothermal is perhaps becoming a little "cooler" these days, with emphasis being placed on its development/implementation particularly in the Scandinavian areas of the world per se. Either way as an industry perhaps it still benefits from tax-credit situations and seems like a sort of interesting industry that may benefit from locally specific geological situation, but perhaps its a decent yield at 3.59% for this sort of relatively-obscure beta per se, and perhaps it might bring another sort of profile to one's portfolio.

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    Beta; "Frack"

    ATLS; Atlas Energy;

    Price; $42.02, Div. Yield; 4.66%

    If one is looking for a frack related high div. yielding stock Atlas Energy may fit that bill. Fracking is perhaps a sort of interesting field in so far as how cash-flows, and permanency per se, of business might relate to sustained dividend levels, but perhaps diversification of cash flow sources can sort of remedy this, particularly for a larger fracking organization. For the frack space as a whole, it seems that the internet in general, and particularly this website seems like a great source for "fracking" related investment ideas, either way however, here's a decent yielding "fracking" space play, and perhaps its the beta one is looking for in this veritable buffet of betas per se for this "Friday Fancy."

    (click to enlarge)

    source

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    Hopefully amidst this variety betas and sectors, one may find the sort of profile one may be looking for, particularly if one is looking for higher yielding plays for these sectors per se. Either way, thanks again for readying, I hope everybody's investments are going great, and without further adieu, the Friday Fancy Mascot, himself, everyone's favorite feathered-Uncle.

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    source

    Tags: ATLS, SSUMY, KWHIY, FCX, PAAS, ARCP, DTH
    Aug 08 1:58 AM | Link | Comment!
  • An Interesting Look Into The Past; Google Newspaper Search

    Earlier today I was looking for some sea-food related stock information, when I came upon a sort of cool find, and a Google search capability that I was hitherto unfamiliar with.

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    (click to enlarge)

    source

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    It seems that Google has links to sort of preserved newspaper pages from times gone past. I haven't really delved into this feature but just seeing this was pretty cool perhaps. It may also perhaps hold some clues as to the nature of price-changes if one will in consumer goods over the years.

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    Here's a link to the page I came across if anyone else is intrigued;

    Link;

    news.google.com/newspapers

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    Its perhaps sort of cool to note the way different items have changed in price over the years per se. The original publishing of this newspaper seems to have been in 1976, and perhaps its interesting to see that while for example food prices have seemingly risen at least 10 fold in some cases, that electronic devices, like for example, the personal two way radio mentioned in the upper right hand corner of the newspaper display, have seemingly stayed the same price relatively speaking(presumably lowering in price relatively speaking).

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    Perhaps this says something in regards to energy prices vs. increased efficiency via automation tech(globally) etc. per se, but either way its perhaps sometimes intriguing to find these sorts of primary sources from days gone by, even if only relatively little time has elapsed per se, in the interim.

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    Thanks for reading, hopefully one's investments have aged well per se.

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    -Modern radio;~138$ vs. the ~160$ as quoted from the ad in the '76, newspaper.

    source

    Aug 02 6:30 PM | Link | 2 Comments
  • Under The Bridge And Into One's Portfolio, Perhaps; Water Stocks

    With the market in general per se, being a little "rough" if one will these past few weeks, I figured that it might be a sort of ideal time to look back on the performance of some water index related stocks.

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    Source

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    The water stocks used here are none other than PIO, FIW, and CGW. Though one might presume that these stocks might have similar returns per se, it seems that there is a slight amount of alpha or systematic yield per se, based on approach to forming said portfolio of water stocks per se, that can pay dividends or at least yield in this case(at least in the medium-long term). In so far as these indices in general are concerned, it seems that they tend to be "industrials" heavy, and they tend to have an emphasis on water investments on either side of the Atlantic per se, in general.

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    The Guggenheim ETF, CGW, is an interesting sort of fund. It's holding-weighting strategy per se, produces an interesting sort of holdings distribution pattern. It heaviest holdings per se, comprise around 5-7% of its portfolio, and this sort of trails off in a sort of wedge like manner into a sort of long tail of around 1% of portfolio holdings-positions. It may also be worthy of note that it has 52 different holdings in its portfolio based on the S&P Global Water Index. As one last note per se, this portfolio has a price to book of roughly 2.4.

    CGW website; guggenheiminvestments.com/products/etf/cgw

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    The First Trust water index investment, FIW, is another interesting water investment if one will. It has 36 or 37 holdings(counting holdings in cash/cash-proxies), and is based on the ISE Water Index. The fund its self, seems to select its holdings based on market-capitalization in general, so perhaps that may be a somewhat interesting approach. This fund's price to book is around 2.25, perhaps placing it in between the other two funds per se.

    FIW website; www.ftportfolios.com/Retail/Etf/EtfSummary.aspx

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    Not to leave our third entry per se out in the cold, PIO is also an interesting investment. It has that similar price to book value of around ~2.15. It also has a sort of heavy top position weighting in some cases with some positions holding upward of 7% to 8% of the total portfolio's assets per se. It also seems more geared towards large and mid-cap growth stocks per se, and is quite US-centric, with about 40% of its holdings representing US-water-related-investments. In so far as # of holdings and base index are concerned, PIO seems to be based on the Nasdaq water index, as opposed to that from the S&P, and has a total # of holdings value of 36 or 37, depending on if one counts cash etc.

    PIO's Website; www.invesco.com/portal/site/us/investors/etfs/product-detail

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    Just before we get to the tables and graphs, for the current dividend yield for these guys per se, we have the following;

    (from Google Finance, similar source for the data used in the other data-displays further below)

    CGW; 1.49

    FIW; .69

    PIO; 1.94

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    According to data from Google finance concerning the price changes of these guys, we have the following for a more long term picture for these water-index-investments in general;

    Price change over time;

    (click to enlarge)Change in Price of the Investments in Question

    and a chart to see this from another angle if one will;

    (click to enlarge)

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    Hence in the data, one may see that FIW in particular is sort of interesting, is has the lowest 1 day losses for today, and the highest 5 years gains overall, just barely edging out CGW for the top spot there. In the interim it seems as though CGW and PIO break even into positive values per se a little earlier, but it seems as though CGW continues that positive streak over time per se, a little more than the other stock that breaks even at roughly the same time per se. FIW seems to pull out the median price to book value per se, at the moment, with the highest long-term gains, but just barely over CGW. Whether this makes it better or not is perhaps a sort of qualitative sort of individual preference call perhaps, for surely it seems a touch more volatile per se, or dynamic if one will.

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    Either way, hopefully if one had water stocks or water investments on one's mind this hopefully helped partially quench that thirst per se. In addition to these sort of investments, there are also sort of interesting water mutual funds if that is more to one's liking per se. One notable water-mutual fund perhaps being CFWAX for example, which is managed by ye olde Calvert Investments, down here in Maryland, which seems to have other interesting sort of sustainable-investment related products on offer aswell.

    Calvert Water Fund website;

    www.calvert.com/fundProfile.html

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    However one goes about adding a little water-stock action to one's portfolio is seems as though in the relatively short-term they look rather similar even if based on somewhat different underlying indices per se, so perhaps just as one may prefer Aquafina or whatnot to Poland Springs, perhaps water investments are somewhat similar, or perhaps some quality of them may be a better fit with one's specific portfolio per se, in regards to the beta/alpha melange of one's own individual investments. Either way hopefully this helped others perhaps get their feet wet aswell per se, in regards to these "liquid investments" if one will. Thanks again for reading, and I hope everybody's investments are doing great.

    Tags: FIW, CGW, PIO, Water, Utilities
    Aug 01 7:23 PM | Link | Comment!
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