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  • Raw Deal for Kraft Shareholders [View article]
    Hello David,

    I would agree with you; its a long term speculative.

    "A reliable dividend-paying and dividend-raising company has been transformed into...what?", this say it all. Thanks for your comment.


    On Sep 22 10:28 AM David Van Knapp wrote:

    > Kraft's bid for Cadbury can only be seen as a good deal for Kraft
    > shareholders through a very long-term lens, and even at that, it
    > is speculative. In the short term, as the author has pointed out,
    > the negatives are a frozen dividend, relatively small EPS growth,
    > and apparent overpayment for the acquisition.
    >
    > I believe (as does famed investor Peter Lynch) in figuring out a
    > stock's "Story." If you can't explain why to buy a stock in a few
    > sentences that a child could understand, don't buy it. With this
    > offer, Kraft has twisted its Story around so that it is now not understandable.
    > For any investor, but especially for a dividend investor, that is
    > a huge red flag. A reliable dividend-paying and dividend-raising
    > company has been transformed into...what? Happily, I don't own Kraft
    > in my dividend portfolio. If I did I would sell. Its reasons for
    > being there have vanished.
    Sep 22, 2009. 10:36 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • BDX – Stock Analysis for Dividend Growth Portfolio [View article]
    You are right in a sense that one can screen out such possibilities. However, dividend achievers like BDX and with its long history, it is prudent to understand its strengths. I would still prefer to know it’s the fair value for it to reach my benchmark. By setting that value, I can keep watch on it. Ignoring such companies at an outset will result in ignoring an opportunity.
    Aug 6, 2009. 01:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What's Buffett's Ideology? [View article]
    Vox Rationalis,
    All the points that you quoted and responded, doesn't that point towards shrewd business acumen ? And not value investing alone as one may read all over the place! Thanks for you comments though !
    Apr 16, 2009. 03:05 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What's Buffett's Ideology? [View article]
    Folks,
    Calm down!
    I am the author of this article. Check out this link
    seekingalpha.com/autho...
    Appears there has been an error when actual article is displayed. SeekingAlpha has been notified (and I am sure they are working on it).

    Looking at comment trails, it does appear that folks agree to the premise of the article that Buffett's approach is value + business acumen (and not value alone). Value can be found anywhere stocks, bonds, national, international, derivatives, currency, etc. It is not limited to the stocks alone (and that's the value trap most of us individual investors fall in, not Buffett)

    Folks, I do not think articles questions Buffett. Does it? The article is an attempt to question the "interpretations of his methodology". Just read last two paragraphs carefully (and hopefully understand the notion!).
    Apr 16, 2009. 02:54 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Thinking Small to Gain Big [View article]
    Murphy:
    Thanks for the link. I still continue to believe the screen technology is not latest and greatest. Technology was available for long. appl just made an excellent use of it in real product.

    Zoltan:
    you are right. And perhaps that gets reflected into product performance and market acceptance.
    Apr 3, 2009. 05:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Waste Management's Trash Has Long-Term Value [View article]
    At this price point, it does not provide a good risk/return characteristics for dividend income (or dividend growth).
    Apr 3, 2009. 04:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Opportunities for Tech Dividends [View article]
    not so smart, squawk
    I did mention ORCL's dividend announcement immediately after"Third Group". it is the first sentence in that para.

    Momintn:
    I like IBM too. It has adapted very well in last decade or so. From a pure hardware play to software tech and services....
    Apr 3, 2009. 04:56 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • My Index Based Investments [View article]
    donzelion/vidro3:
    In this post, I provided the shortlist for two markets. I am working on next post analyzing which one is good of my objective. So stay tuned!

    Thanks for your comments/observations!
    Mar 11, 2009. 01:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • EPI: My Pick from All India Focused Funds [View article]
    d_teller:
    I think it is different perspective. I would agree with all your arguments from a "subjective financial engineering" viewpoint. However, from an individual investor's viewpoint, I have a difference of opinion. (1) individual investors viewpoint, NAV vs. market price has no meaning. Through out the last 2 years it has been trading at discount, except for few days in 08. When investors sell in open market, its the market price which counts, not NAV. (2) paying a lot of distribution and reducing NAV as no affect to individual investors. Its like selling ones property to generate cash!! (3) regarding constraints and restraints of buying securities, if that's the case then all CEFs/ETFs/ETNs have same issue. If one fund can do that with low expense, why IIF is asking for more. (4) total holdings or coverage or cap weightage, it really does not matter because the fund still invests more than 60% in top ten alone. Other funds do the same with less fees (5) High fees has to come with certain quality in investment process. If fund is doing the same as other funds, then higher fees is not justified. So from individual investor perspective, its performance and execution is same as others, plus worst performance, and hence does not justify the higher fees. (6) I would agree with you on transparency or following SENSEX. It is pain in neck. but again, why have higher fees when investors get the same in less!

    Teak: EPI pays cap gains and dividends once a year, dividends are "earned income" for tax purposes. So far, it has not yet retained dividends.

    EconoMarcus:
    regarding investing in India - I would agree with you on geo-political environment in Indian and its neighbors. I did make very similar comments about India at my blog (www.dividendtree.net/2.../). India/Pakistan have been bickering about each other for last 50+ years, have three fought wars, and its a never ending cycle. Focusing on positive side, Indian economy is continuously growing, last 15 years its been progressively following reforms process. Short term it may issues, but longer term, I expect it to continue to grow. As a matter of fact, now is the right time to invest in India. Buy low, sell high !!

    Subhankar:
    Any discussion on Indian equity markets ends with list of ADR companies. That's it. Because nothing is properly disclosed or available or restricted. To put it mildly, just getting information and/or attempting to follow Indian equity markets is a pain in neck.
    Feb 25, 2009. 03:19 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • International Equities for a Dividend Growth Portfolio [View article]
    Pawan/Hasmukh:

    The general practice is to use share premium account for capital requirements, loss provisions, certain expenses, etc. There is a specific provision which does not allow funds to be used for dividends (or returning to shareholders in any other form) Having said that, there is certainly an intangible benefit of large funding available in share premium account. The company than does not need to allocate capital from EPS or debt. For assessing true quality of dividneds, individual investors can circumvent this by looking at payout factor (i.e. dividends as function of annual EPS).

    Best Regards,
    Feb 23, 2009. 01:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • International Equities for a Dividend Growth Portfolio [View article]
    Pawan/Hasmukh:

    The general practice is to use share premium account for capital requirements, loss provisions, certain expenses, etc. There is a specific provision which does not allow funds to be used for dividends (or returning to shareholders in any other form) Having said that, there is certainly an intangible benefit of large funding available in share premium account. The company than does not need to allocate capital from EPS or debt. For assessing true quality of dividneds, individual investors can circumvent this by looking at payout factor (i.e. dividends as function of annual EPS).

    Best Regards,
    Feb 23, 2009. 01:37 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Risk Management, Or Risk Manipulation [View article]
    The author fails to mention that a fundamental level, models were used to justify risk taking (by purposely hacking to show low risk). Models are as good as one wants it to be. If wall streets (and people like you) are hell bent on negating the modeling tool, why the heck wall streets engineer water tight pay/bonus packages for themselves. Why was not linked to the company performance ? Model are great tools, depends on how one wants to use it. A screw driver can be used to plug a hole (or it could be used to make a hole). Wall street used it to "make a hole". They took what came out of that hole, and ran when it became a deluge.......
    Jan 31, 2009. 10:02 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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