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Doug Carey, CFA

 
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  • Future Stock Market Returns And Your Retirement Plan [View article]
    The couple in my example is 55, not 35.
    Feb 7 03:16 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Future Stock Market Returns And Your Retirement Plan [View article]
    Sorry for the confusion. The "all in IRAs" is a misprint. Thanks for pointing it out.
    Feb 7 01:51 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy For The 40-Somethings [View article]
    No doubt having the income in retirement support you is the way to go. But unfortunately with interest rates so low and many people refusing to have too much money in stocks in retirement, that is simply not possible for a lot of people any more.
    Jan 18 09:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy For The 40-Somethings [View article]
    Thanks richjoy- It does seem that 68 is the new 65. Actually, 72 might be the new 65 for many people these days when it comes to when they can retire.
    Jan 17 04:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy For The 40-Somethings [View article]
    The $50,000 does not include the amount they will pay in taxes.
    Jan 17 04:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    I took the number straight from Yahoo finance. I didn't calculate anything with regards to debt to equity.
    Jan 11 04:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    It is here- http://yhoo.it/u6H2LN
    Jan 11 01:35 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    Yes, companies that have debt to equity above 100% will not work well in the spreadsheet. Initially this spreadsheet was designed for companies with relatively low debt and strong dividends. I will have to think of a good way to handle this problem. Thanks for pointing it out.
    Jan 11 01:35 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    I guess I'm not sure what the alternative is if you're not going to have some method for weighting your stocks. Dartboard? Random number generator? Most people use some methodology to weight their investments, whether they explicitly put it on paper or a spreadsheet or not.
    Jan 10 05:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Taxes Are Going Up: When Can You Retire Now? [View article]
    Yes, that was a mistake. I was supposed to split that balance between IRAs and taxable funds. That would lower their probably of success slightly, but the impact isn't extremely large.
    Jan 4 12:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Taxes Are Going Up: When Can You Retire Now? [View article]
    Taxes is the answer. And remember, in the worst-case scenario I have social security being reduced for them.
    Jan 4 09:38 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Taxes Are Going Up: When Can You Retire Now? [View article]
    It's the total amount spent. So if 35K comes from social security then they need 5K from other sources.
    Jan 3 02:17 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Taxes Are Going Up: When Can You Retire Now? [View article]
    I do, actually. " So I moved the 25% of Treasury funds they own into a 50/50 combination of Treasury-Inflation Protected Securities (TIP) and a portfolio of solid dividend paying stocks with a history of consistent dividend growth..."
    Jan 3 02:16 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Taxes Are Going Up: When Can You Retire Now? [View article]
    Dave- I assumed they spend $40K per year in retirement. Check out the table in the article. I list many of the assumptions used there.
    Jan 3 10:43 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Yield Vs. Dividend Growth: Kimberly-Clark Vs. Wal-Mart [View article]
    Very good comments and questions in this thread. Steve, you asked "You could always switch from KMB to WMT at that point."

    The main reason is this: Most likely the price of Wal-Mart's stock will have risen by that point so you would have missed out on the price growth and you will now be locking in a lower yield-on-cost. You would also have missed out on all of the dividend growth during this time.

    My view is that when you invest in DG companies you are betting on their business model and their continued growth in earnings and dividends. If you believe in the company and trust the company to keep growing their dividends then they might be the better investment compared to a higher yielding stock.

    What I really try to show with these articles is that you don't have to have a 4%+ dividend yield to be a solid long-term investment. It's very important to understand the potential a DG stock can have, which is why I like to run the numbers over 10 and 20 years.
    Dec 28 10:06 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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