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Doug Carey, CFA

 
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  • How A Company Like Johnson & Johnson Can Rescue Your Retirement [View article]
    Right, the numbers do work using that assumption. Thanks for clarifying. I may add an option to our calculators that allows for an assumption that the stock price moves to keep the dividend yield constant. Thanks for the feedback.
    Feb 21, 2013. 06:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Company Like Johnson & Johnson Can Rescue Your Retirement [View article]
    That implies a total return of over 10% per year. I'm assuming you must be inputting some sort of stock price growth as well. Otherwise the numbers cannot be right.
    Feb 21, 2013. 02:46 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Company Like Johnson & Johnson Can Rescue Your Retirement [View article]
    Yes, I did assume dividend reinvestment. I should have pointed that out. As for the price gain due to dividends going up, it's really just a matter of the difference in taxes at that point. Capital gains would be better in one respect, and that is that they are not taxed until the holdings are sold. But the difference in the overall retirement plan numbers is not that stark.
    Feb 20, 2013. 04:34 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Company Like Johnson & Johnson Can Rescue Your Retirement [View article]
    I actually think the numbers are worse than that because they don't take into account how much debt these people are in. Many people have some money saved, but they also have credit card debt, student loan debt, etc.
    Feb 20, 2013. 04:06 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • AT&T And CenturyLink: How Will These Telecommunication Stocks' Dividends Fare Over Time? [View article]
    CTL is a good example of why many of us push "high quality" dividend payers. By high quality I mean those with little to no debt, a long history of increasing dividends, and a payout ratio below 75%.
    Feb 14, 2013. 03:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Future Stock Market Returns And Your Retirement Plan [View article]
    You can run these in our Retirement Planner. Feel free to sign up for a free trial at http://bit.ly/ylqKdW
    Feb 7, 2013. 03:17 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Future Stock Market Returns And Your Retirement Plan [View article]
    The couple in my example is 55, not 35.
    Feb 7, 2013. 03:16 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Future Stock Market Returns And Your Retirement Plan [View article]
    Sorry for the confusion. The "all in IRAs" is a misprint. Thanks for pointing it out.
    Feb 7, 2013. 01:51 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy For The 40-Somethings [View article]
    No doubt having the income in retirement support you is the way to go. But unfortunately with interest rates so low and many people refusing to have too much money in stocks in retirement, that is simply not possible for a lot of people any more.
    Jan 18, 2013. 09:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy For The 40-Somethings [View article]
    Thanks richjoy- It does seem that 68 is the new 65. Actually, 72 might be the new 65 for many people these days when it comes to when they can retire.
    Jan 17, 2013. 04:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy For The 40-Somethings [View article]
    The $50,000 does not include the amount they will pay in taxes.
    Jan 17, 2013. 04:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    I took the number straight from Yahoo finance. I didn't calculate anything with regards to debt to equity.
    Jan 11, 2013. 04:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    It is here- http://yhoo.it/u6H2LN
    Jan 11, 2013. 01:35 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    Yes, companies that have debt to equity above 100% will not work well in the spreadsheet. Initially this spreadsheet was designed for companies with relatively low debt and strong dividends. I will have to think of a good way to handle this problem. Thanks for pointing it out.
    Jan 11, 2013. 01:35 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Choose Weights For Your Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    I guess I'm not sure what the alternative is if you're not going to have some method for weighting your stocks. Dartboard? Random number generator? Most people use some methodology to weight their investments, whether they explicitly put it on paper or a spreadsheet or not.
    Jan 10, 2013. 05:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
334 Comments
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