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Eli Inkrot

 
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  • The High-Yield Vs. Low-Yield Battle [View article]
    Thanks Dave, I truly appreciate it. That's a good point; for the sake of brevity I tend to condense the background math in favor of the bottom line conclusions.
    Aug 21 01:34 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The High-Yield Vs. Low-Yield Battle [View article]
    Thanks R we there yet, I truly appreciate it.
    Aug 20 10:48 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    George, I appreciate your follow up. I would contend too able. The kid turns out an astounding supply of quality and quantity. I could be wrong, but out of anyone I believe Tim would be the person to bet on as far as making it on his own.
    Aug 19 08:24 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Hi George, thanks for your message and kind words. I am not. On my own and loving it. I especially like that I can contribute in a way that's outside of what I might have normally been required and / or requested to do. All the best.
    Aug 19 04:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Thanks Robert! This is great information. I certainly wasn't "cheering" for one side or the other, but I think it's practical to keep this kind of knowledge in mind. Given enough time, low yields don't necessarily equate to low income streams.
    Aug 18 02:26 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Thanks Dave! I really appreciate it.

    I think your takeaway is an especially good one. Incidentally, I just wrote an article on MCY which purposely grew its payout ratio from about 30% to over 100%. Management has even indicated that it's unsustainable unless the company can become more profitable. Which is the opposite of some of the companies listed above. It all depends on the company's idea of a "proper" payout. As such, it's important to partner with companies that share a similar ideology on the subject to your own.
    Aug 18 02:24 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Thanks Mutinousdogs, I appreciate both your comment and kind words. You got it: it's important to define your goals first rather than initially looking for the highest yield you can find or something of the sort.
    Aug 18 02:20 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Thanks Neurology, I certainly appreciate it.
    Aug 18 02:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Thanks, dividend bonanza! I appreciate your comment.
    Aug 18 02:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Hi Peter, thanks for your comment. Reasonable point. The special dividend certainly isn't as reliable, but it shouldn't be overlooked. In viewing the company's website, BEN has paid a special dividend 4 times since 2005. Not exactly dependable, but frequent enough to warrant a mention.
    Aug 16 08:16 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Characteristics Of The Lowest-Yielding Dividend Champions [View article]
    Hi David, thanks for the update. I certainly wasn't as well versed in these listed companies. However, the ideology remains: low yields shouldn't necessarily be automatically overlooked. Even with the increase, NDSN still has quite a low comparative yield.
    Aug 16 08:08 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Constructing A Monthly Income Portfolio [View article]
    Hi SDS, thanks for your comment. For many, perhaps most, I would surmise nothing is "wrong" with that. However, as illustrated in the article above, it might become problematic on a fixed budget. For instance, monthly expenses of $2k and cash flows of $1.5k, $1.5k and $3k average to $2k, but create a deficit problem in the first two months.
    Aug 13 07:12 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How Do You Hold Cash When Realty Income Or AT&T Are Available? [View article]
    retail, thanks for your comment. Two notes:

    I agree, the percentages reported were not percentages of wealth. However, they weren't monthly allocations of income either. The first table demonstrates the cash allocation of investable assets. The next pie chart, to which you are referring, is a monthly allocation of one's saving/investing budget. In other words, in large part, their monthly allocation of investable assets. You can easily see your error in thinking this is income when you look at the components. Every single one is an investable asset (obviously everyone isn't living on the street, starving, spending 0% on expenses and simultaneously using 100% of income to invest.)

    More broadly, whether you're holding 50% or 5% "too much" (which admittedly is a highly personalized number) cash - that is investable funds - it stands that there is an opportunity cost in doing so. Thanks for reading.
    Aug 13 03:15 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How Do You Hold Cash When Realty Income Or AT&T Are Available? [View article]
    Mike, thanks for the follow up and encouragement. It's good to disagree once in awhile :) Although I think this might even be a subset of that. Your stance is reasonable and I understand some like holding cash for opportunities. I'm merely suggesting that waiting for an opportunity also has its own inherent opportunity cost.
    Aug 13 02:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Ben Graham's Explanation For The Dividend Champions' Premium Valuation [View article]
    Hi advisor, thanks for your follow up message.

    The confusion stems from the two being unrelated. This articled demonstrated why, according to Graham, many long-term dividend payers demand a premium valuation. I wasn't indicating that Graham would buy these companies (although Buffett has).

    Then you asked for what Graham specifically stated. Namely, not paying over 20 times trailing twelve month earnings or 25 times trailing seven year average earnings. So according to his own rules, a P/E of say 21 would likely be out of the question. However, a P/E of 19 - which is quite similar in scope and "premium" - wouldn't be.

    I didn't cite Graham as supporting a theory. I simply made a statement: Graham said long standing dividend paying companies ought to have a premium multiple. I agreed with this and further added: "because of both inherent quality and mathematical reasons."
    Aug 13 02:52 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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