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Eli Inkrot  

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  • Is Chevron's 'Frozen' Dividend An Opportunity? [View article]
    Hi Cash Flow, thanks for your comment. Although it should be noted that XOM has an even more robust history than CVX of paying the same dividend for five consecutive quarters or more:

    http://seekingalpha.co...

    Perhaps most to the point, twice in the last 25 years has the company paid the same dividend for 10 straight quarters. Beyond this there are a bevy of examples of "irregular" or "non-conventional" increases in the company's past. By relying solely on recent history, it could simply be the case that one's frame of reference is too short. All the best.
    May 6, 2015. 03:29 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Procter & Gamble Could Be A 'Better' Choice Than Colgate-Palmolive [View article]
    Hi jimmy, thanks for your comment. Your logic is reasonable, but the answer, like most things, is: it depends. Assuming constant dividend yields, the faster growth would lead to greater appreciation and thus a potentially higher compound return. However, much like being cautious with dividend growth rates, it can be prudent to do the same thing here. Presently Procter & Gamble has a higher dividend yield than Colgate, but this might not always be the case. If the yields were to reverse, the appreciation wouldn't be as clear cut - PG's price would grow faster than its dividend while CL's price would increase at a slower rate. Once more the idea of relative timeframes becomes paramount.

    Perhaps just as important is the idea that this was merely an example; a "stacked" one at that. If the company's were to grow their payouts at similar rates moving forward, as has been the case in the past decade, the dynamics change. The total return characteristics of each could be similar, albeit getting there in a slightly different manner. The point was not to indicate a "better" security, rather to underscore the idea that you can't just look at a single year and suppose one will be better than the other. There are a bevy of additional factors to consider. I hope that helps, all the best.
    May 5, 2015. 05:11 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Procter & Gamble Could Be A 'Better' Choice Than Colgate-Palmolive [View article]
    Thanks CapeCap, I appreciate both your comment and kind words. I agree: both companies have proven to be excellent businesses. Keeping in mind the underlying math can better direct how you think about the process. All the best.
    May 5, 2015. 03:39 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Franklin Resources: Gain From Its Capital Allocation Strategy [View article]
    Hi scorpsteals, thanks for your comment. While I do try to bring about various investing thoughts, it should be underscored that this is certainly not a recommendation. It is always prudent to complete one's own diligence, based on personal circumstances, and I would not provide a blanket recommendation. Everyone is different.
    Apr 23, 2015. 05:44 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Franklin Resources: Gain From Its Capital Allocation Strategy [View article]
    Hi Robert, thanks for your comment. Note that “special” dividends are such denoted to indicate a lack of future obligation, not unpredictability (much like repurchases). Some firms regularly pay a “special” dividend. I agree that the timing and amount would be difficult to predict, but it does not follow you couldn’t expect them to occur some time in the future. In any event, in the sake of prudence, I indicated no such dividends in the above assumptions.

    Additionally, it should be made clear that I have no great affinity for buybacks. Instead, I simply look at the investment circumstances and present them appropriately. Like most things, the value depends on price paid. All the best.
    Apr 23, 2015. 05:40 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Skewed Nature Of Dividend Growth Rates [View article]
    Thanks Dave, I truly appreciate it. I wanted to demonstrate the idea's practicality via both real-stock and hypothetical examples. Often people get caught up in one or the other, so hopefully I offered enough for both crowds. The general construct is to simply to pay attention to your underlying goals and how each security in your portfolio works toward those objectives. Doing the underlying math often illuminates certain investing nuances - like not blindly accepting an average growth rate. Once again, I appreciate it. All the best.
    Apr 21, 2015. 03:35 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Would Moderate Growth Mean For Aflac? [View article]
    Hi Planning for Retirement, thanks for your comment and kind words. I agree: the benefit of reinvesting can add a nice boost over the years. In fact, just to illustrate the point, I have provided a follow up on the magnitude of what that benefit, with respect to Aflac, might look like:

    http://seekingalpha.co...

    If I can open up an avenue of investing thought for others, I've done my job. Once again I appreciate it. All the best.
    Apr 17, 2015. 04:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Forecast Constant, Expect Erratic [View article]
    Thanks supersqueeks, I truly appreciate it. I'll make you a deal: I'll keep writing if you keep reading :) All the best!
    Apr 17, 2015. 09:23 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric: Long-Term Investing Vs. Short-Term Thinking [View article]
    Thanks buyandhold, I appreciate it. I agree. In my opinion the phrase is a comment on exact time frames rather than a typical investment strategy. Most investors will deploy capital not just once, but regularly and over a great deal of time. As such, you're not limited to the outcome of just one time period. Rather, your investment returns are predicated on many different periods. In turn, given the positive nature of profitable businesses, your investing results will also more or less follow suit.
    Apr 17, 2015. 09:19 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric: Long-Term Investing Vs. Short-Term Thinking [View article]
    Hi Steve, thanks for your comment and kind words. If I can get my audience to think a bit, I've done my job. Hopefully I can continue to resonate with a great deal of investors.

    Your disclosure is on point, and one that would apply to the majority of my articles. The concept is the important part, not the specific company. But alas the alternative of using "XYZ corp" usually doesn't carry as much interest. I've tried to make this type of disclosure routine, but some don't move past the ticker tag. I'm encouraged by people like you who truly get it. I think there's a lot more value this way: instead of being limited by a single company you can apply a concept to a wide array of securities. Certainly this knowledge is far superior to anything I could present in a single article. Thanks again, all the best!
    Apr 17, 2015. 09:13 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Forecast Constant, Expect Erratic [View article]
    Thanks Michael, I truly appreciate it. I agree: the key is time and effort. Both of which are made easier via partnering with wonderful businesses. All the best.
    Apr 16, 2015. 10:21 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Aflac: What A 'Sit On Your Hands' Investment Looks Like [View article]
    Thanks Ray, I appreciate it. All the best.
    Apr 16, 2015. 08:59 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What Would Moderate Growth Mean For Aflac? [View article]
    Thanks PSound, I appreciate it. Note that this should carry through to all of my articles: its always prudent to complete one's own diligence. My job is simply to allow others to think about the process.
    Apr 15, 2015. 05:26 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric: What A 15% Higher Price Means For Returns [View article]
    Thanks Tim, I certainly appreciate it. All the best.
    Apr 15, 2015. 12:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric: What A 15% Higher Price Means For Returns [View article]
    Hi OldFig, thanks for your comment. As noted above, the beginning projections mentioned in the article were how you might have thought about the security prior to the announcement. The second part suggested that the anticipated outcome, say ~$5.30 in dividends collected and a $1.20 dividend in five years, could remain the same. Note that this does not necessarily force the yearly dividends to be the same as you once projected. That is, GE could pay the same dividend next year and still satisfy both situations described.
    Apr 14, 2015. 06:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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