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  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    DS

    You are correct, the low price is due to return of capital. I would look at the total return performance chart offered on Morningstar.
    Sep 14 09:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    Dave,

    Let me think about this one and reply later.
    Sep 14 06:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • TransAlta: Power Producer's Reset Preferred Shares May Be Preferred Over The Common [View article]
    Jim,

    I don't know about the Generals, but it seems the foot soldiers are deserting en mass. Over the past week, volume has picked up as the stock fell below $11. At $10.43, it now almost matches the low of 2003.
    Sep 14 05:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    auto,

    Thanks for reading and posting your kind words. I like GAS expansion into the pipeline business in the Northeast and MidAtlantic, however, I prefer NFG for better potential cap gains.
    Sep 14 04:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    JM,

    Thanks for reading and posting your comments. I would also add Mario Gabelli. I would look at his portfolio in GABUX as I like his approach. Reading his quarterly comments is well worth the time and effort.
    Sep 14 04:42 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    Jerry,

    Thanks for reading and posting your comments. Interesting perspective
    Sep 14 04:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    DS,

    I agree with Jerry there on the nat gas front and have been long DMLP since about 2005. A royalty trust wrapped in a MLP structure that has grown its reserve base almost equal to annual production draw-down. It is a unhedged exposure to nat gas and this causes the variance in the distribution. Although overpriced, MIC is another favorite that I bought at the depths of the decline, CMLEF is an interesting Canadian REIT (there is a tax advantage of owning Canadian REITs as the distribution is considered "qualified" for US taxes). OZM and BGCF in the financial money management sector offer good yields, as does PWCDF and HSBC. Santander Prf A offers a 10% divy. Income fund GABUX offers an interesting return of capital approach with a 15% distribution yield. I also like the DMP and SE combination and an waiting on the IPO of DM, the Dominion Resources spinoff called Dominion Midstream. Lastly, although the yield is low NFG should both split up and rise the divy over time.

    I also agree with Jerry on the commodity end. I invest in Glencore GLNCF, that pays about a 2.5% divy. The investment holding company GBL GBLBF in Brussels and Pargessa PRGAF in Zurich pay a divy of between 3.5% and 4.0% (but watch out for those withholding taxes), are trading about 25% below NAV and own some of the best European stocks (such as 25% of NAV is in TOT). SCCO is an interesting one for copper, but I prefer Glencore.

    Hope this helps
    FD: long all the names above, except SCCO
    Sep 14 04:39 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    Dave,

    Thank you for your kind words. I appreciate reading and posting your comments
    Sep 13 09:26 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    RC,

    Thanks for reading and posting your comments
    Sep 13 09:26 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Is Your Regulated Electric Utility Handling Distributed Generation? [View article]
    ricardo,

    Thanks for reading and posting your comments
    Sep 13 09:25 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • If You Like Chicago Bridge & Iron, You May Want To Own Oil Infrastructure Construction Firm AMEC [View article]
    bb,

    AMEC is over exposed to both North America and Europe, which is why the merger with Foster Wheeler is critical. FW will expand not only product capabilities but geographic coverage as well
    Sep 12 09:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gabelli reports 9.16% stake in National Fuel, urges spinoff of utility unit [View news story]
    This is not really new news. See my article on this topic from last May. http://seekingalpha.co...
    This filing simply formalizes the previous press release that Gabelli was in the process of making his submission.
    Sep 12 06:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • If You Like Chicago Bridge & Iron, You May Want To Own Oil Infrastructure Construction Firm AMEC [View article]
    Arbalet,

    Thanks for reading and posting your comments. However, I believe from my research that UK withholding of corporate dividends for US citizens is 0% based on the most recent tax treaty (excluding REITs and interest).

    You are correct AMEC "anticipates" a listing on US exchanges as a sponsored ADR after the merger. What is a bit confusing to me is the current symbol AMBCY which indicates a sponsor, but has no volume since early 2012. The "new" listing should be interesting
    Sep 12 10:18 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • If You Like Chicago Bridge & Iron, You May Want To Own Oil Infrastructure Construction Firm AMEC [View article]
    Guraaf,

    Thanks for reading and posting your question. Dividends and tax implications are the same, and usually the price is the same. There could be different ratios of ADR shares to local shares. For example, a sponsored ADR could have a ratio of 1 ADR = 5 foreign shares while an unsponsored may be a 1 ADR = 1 foreign shares (in this case, the sponsored ADR would have 5 times the value, dividend, ect.). Usually stock symbols ending in "F" are unsponsored and those ending in "Y" are sponsored.

    From Zacks, "Sponsored ADR - With a sponsored ADR, the foreign company initiates and supports the ADR program in the United States. The company must meet certain Securities and Exchange Commission reporting requirements. With a sponsored ADR the foreign company knows how many of its shares are in the ADR program and has access to investors owning the shares. Only sponsored ADRs can be listed on the stock exchanges, the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. However, some sponsored ADRs list on the over-the-counter -- OTC -- markets.

    Unsponsored ADRs - With an unsponsored ADR, the custodian bank buys shares of the foreign company, brings the shares into the United States and then issues ADR shares to U.S. investors. The foreign company does not support or authorize an unsponsored ADR. While a sponsored ADR can only have one custodian bank, multiple banks can choose to issue unsponsored ADRs of a single foreign company. Multiple ADRs for a foreign stock can result in differing ADR share prices and dividend payment amounts. Unsponsored ADR shares only trade over the counter.

    Pros and Cons - For all practical purposes, investing in a sponsored ADR is the same as buying shares of an exchange listed U.S. company. The foreign company must meet SEC and exchange reporting and listing requirements. With an unsponsored ADR, the shares are still backed by shares of the foreign company held by a U.S. bank. Lack of sponsorship means the foreign company may not provide the same financial information and support to investors. Also, unsponsored ADR shares can be very thinly traded, increasing the bid-ask spread transaction costs when buying or selling."

    In my opinion, for retail investors there is little difference and I prefer to buys and sell the ones with the higher volume and liquidity

    Hope this helps
    Sep 12 08:30 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • If You Like Chicago Bridge & Iron, You May Want To Own Oil Infrastructure Construction Firm AMEC [View article]
    SSnape,

    Thanks for reading and posting your comments.
    Sep 11 09:00 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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