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Greg Parker  

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  • Six Air Courier Stocks to Transport Your Portfolio to New Heights [View article]
    I'm a big fan of Air T (AIRT) also. Great fundamentals and a nice dividend. Just the kind of stock Warren Buffett would love, if only he could buy shares in such a small company.

    seekingalpha.com/artic...
    Jun 7, 2009. 12:29 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • American Express, Discover Top Credit Card Provider Rankings [View article]
    The stock ticker CCF belongs to Chase Corporation, a manufacturer of sealants and laminates and not to Chase bank as the article link implies. I believe the ticker you are looking for is JPM
    Jun 6, 2009. 11:52 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Else Are the Banks Hiding? [View article]
    A good, thought-provoking article. A quick scan through all the comments reveals that there really are still a lot of unknowns in the financial sector, and that everyone creates their own suppositions based on what they believe the lack of information truly means.

    For example, one could argue that the lack of information regarding off balance sheet assets must mean that there are huge losses hiding, because if there was any good news then they would've told us already. This enables them to possibly off load some of it to investors who aren't entirely sure what they are actually buying! You could also just as easily argue that the lack of information means that banks are still making decent income from these assets and they are not ready to give them up at firesale prices.

    My gut feeling is that the former is closer to the truth, although it probably isn't quite that clear cut. I that if we knew more of what goes on behind the scenes and off the balance sheets at many banks, then the markets would fall much more than we have already witnessed, but that may just be due to a lack of understanding.
    Mar 29, 2009. 10:03 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Less Available Credit: Bad for Spending? Or Good for Banking? [View article]
    The government and the media seem to be painting an overly optimistic picture of the current economic environment, saying that the worst is over and that the Federal Reserve has everything under control. I don't think we could be further from the truth, as two further bubbles are readying themselves to pop.

    I fear a collapse in the treasury market along with a strong possibility that the US will have to default on its debts, as they cannot keep on printing money indefinitely. And I fear a further collapse in the banking industry fueled by delinquencies of consumer credit cards.

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...

    Credit card companies have been seen to be raising interest rates, cutting credit lines, and closing inactive accounts. This serves to reduce consumer spending and confidence, and is a self-feeding cycle as it leads to reduced FICO scores, leading to reduced access to credit which in turn causes a further reduction in spending, hurting the economy further in the process.

    You state in your article that this is not really an issue, however, it depends on the consumer. With the level of unemployment still rising, we are seeing more and more people using credit just to survive and make essential purchases. People have already cut back significantly on large purchases such as houses, cars and vacations, they have also cut back on luxuries, electronics and the like. People are now relying on credit for essential, day to day purchases such as food, clothing and energy. Now, I don't know about you but I find this scary! Credit card companies have been reporting increasing numbers of delinquencies, and I fear the worst is still to come.

    Disclosure - Author holds positions in TBT and FAZ.
    Mar 28, 2009. 04:44 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Credit Card Crunch: Creating a New Generation of Subprime [View article]
    Nice article, I couldn't agree more.

    Everybody likes to point their fingers at the government, or blame the banks for the economic mess that we currently find ourselves in, but maybe we as consumers have helped facilitate things more than most of us like to admit. Everybody likes to accuse the banks of being greedy, but ultimately they are in the business to make money for themselves and their shareholders, not to be charitable to the general public.

    We are all grown adults, and those of us that have made poor financial choices should take responsibility for them, learn from them, and move on. I am not pointing fingers at everyone, as we are left with a situation where those of us that were responsible with our finances, and made "smart" choices, are the people having to bail out the irresponsible and greedy! I am also not supporting some of the banks actions - they were irresponsible and reckless at times. I believe that if we knew more of what went on behind the scenes and off the balance sheets at many banks, then the markets would fall much more than we have already witnessed, but I do think we as consumers need to take part of the responsibility.

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...

    The worrying thing is that with the level of unemployment still rising, we are seeing more and more people using credit just to survive and make essential purchases. People have already cut back significantly on large purchases and luxuries and are yet are still forced to rely on credit to pay for food, clothing, energy and healthcare. I think the ride is far from being over...
    Mar 28, 2009. 04:24 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Will the Recession End? [View article]
    I don't see any reason to believe that this is the bottom, or that the bottom is anywhere close. Unemployment numbers continue to get worse, there doesn't appear to be any significant improvement in the housing market, the Fed is printing money at an incredible pace while trying to obtain even more powers than it already has.

    It is unreasonable to believe that the government can bail out all of the fallen giants without further repercussions. The latest plan appears to amount to little more than moving the toxins further up the economic food chain. Ultimately I fear a total collapse in the treasury market despite the FOMC's attempt to prop it up, as the Chinese and Japanese refuse to continue to fund the Fed's wild spending spree.

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...

    Disclosure - At the time of writing the author held positions in FAZ and TBT
    Mar 24, 2009. 11:21 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Let's Put Monday's Market Rally in Perspective [View article]
    Nice article, and spot on with the movie clip. I totally agree that we've not seen the end of the downside. There's still a lot of negatives that need to work their way through the system before we can experience a LASTING rally. I'm sure we'll see several bear market rallies as we resume the slide into negative territory.

    The banking sector still has fundamental flaws in its business model, which will take time to correct. Added to which, the huge level of US debt is in danger of causing a collapse in the treasury market, particularly if countries such as China and Japan do not continue to purchase as much US debt in the future as in years past.

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...

    Disclosure - At the time of writing the author held positions in FAZ and TBT.
    Mar 24, 2009. 09:17 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The UN, China Want to Ditch the Dollar [View article]
    An interesting article. Another thought to consider is this.

    With the Chinese government having the world's largest holding of US treasuries and continually expressing their discontent over the devaluing nature of the US government's activities toward their investment, and the Federal Reserve announcing plans to purchase long term treasuries in the days to come. I believe it is quite likely that they will purchase some of those directly from China as a means of appeasing them a little, rather than buying just freshly created ones. This also reduces the inflationary risk of their actions. This in turn carries with it the implication that the Chinese will not be purchasing many more new treasuries from the US in the near future, heightening the risk of a collapse in the treasury market.

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...

    Disclosure - At the time of writing the author held a position in TBT, and is bullish on oil, gold and commodities.
    Mar 24, 2009. 08:39 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • China Wants to Ditch the Dollar [View article]
    While very few can argue about the weakness of the US dollar, I believe that China is in no place to provide a suitable replacement currency, and the Eurozone even less so. Rather than arguing for a new reserve currency, they are probably best to make a push to devalue the yuan in order to stimulate their own economy.

    With the FOMC announcing plans to purchase treasuries, there is a good possibility that they will be purchasing some existing ones from the Chinese, rather than just freshly created ones, in order to appease them a little. All of which could ultimately lead to a collapse of the treasury market.

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...

    Disclosure: At the time of writing the author held a position in TBT.
    Mar 24, 2009. 02:04 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Geron Corp: Up 50% on Nothing but Hope [View article]
    Yes, totally agree. Stem cell research may well be the bubble of 2009 as weary investors try to make a quick buck to cover last years losses. Clearly all hype and no evidence of profitability. Riding the "Obama wave"....

    mostlymoneymusings.blo...
    Jan 27, 2009. 08:38 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 14 Stem Cell, Renewable Energy Opportunities for the Obama Era [View article]
    Stem cell research may prove to be the bubble of 2009 as weary investors try to recoup some of their heavy losses from 2008. Clearly investors are riding the "Obama wave", STEM and GERN are all hype with no evidence of profitability.

    Stem cell bubble
    Jan 27, 2009. 08:16 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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