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Gregory Ness

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  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    Did you see this chart on the growth in ORCL licenses?
    http://bit.ly/J7VIC4
    Dec 19 12:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    This link might help: http://bit.ly/J7VIC4
    Dec 19 12:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    Very relevant but not critical IMHO. I have not had much access to GOOG execs to get their perspective on hybrid cloud and as yet don't see them winning over enterprise execs (versus AWS, OpenStack, vCloud, Azure, etc.) so I generally don't discuss them. G
    Dec 17 11:20 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    Michael: Thanks for your comments. Good luck with ORCL.
    Dec 11 04:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    I think the powerhouse AWS opportunity is to move IT from maintenance mode into product and service development mode. To me, that is one of the most powerful implications of the shift from servers to APIs.
    Dec 11 02:24 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    Security and management are issues... but IMHO they are being addressed at an accelerated pace, which is why I predicted recently that AWS would embrace the hybrid cloud: http://bit.ly/1bEsIwI

    Thanks for the comment
    Dec 11 02:21 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon, Microsoft And The Colocation Challenge [View article]
    I have had considerable interactions with execs in the companies mentioned above over the last five-plus years, so I'm naturally more comfortable righting about them regarding innovation. I think Larry predicted this many years ago then became jaded. My last interaction with a senior ORCL exec was in running a cloud panel right after the exec (who spoke before us) denied the cloud was strategic to ORCL (fall/2010). Also, if I mention ORCL I would also need to mention IBM, BMC, CA, HP, Dell and others who I think have innovation opportunities. I was tempted to call out some colo-centric companies but decided to simply focus on the industry.

    In short, today I have ambiguous sentiments when it comes to about a dozen companies, of which ORCL is included, and I don't see a compelling reason (yet) to call them out unless I'm focusing on sheer market share or the point when their hands are not being used as cushions.
    Dec 11 02:19 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Pigeonhole Problem [View article]
    Ian/Arne:

    I've put the public cloud in perspective for you guys: http://bit.ly/11HT6Pf

    Public cloud revenues= <$4B
    3rd party hosing and colocation= >$20B
    Overall IT spending= >$3T

    Hope that helps.
    G
    Apr 25 04:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Pigeonhole Problem [View article]
    The private cloud represented the commoditization of server hardware, albeit within the confines of the data center(s). Public cloud represents the first generation of IaaS, the commoditization of infrastructure. Enterprises have evolved with specialized needs/requirements, some of which involve operating models, proprietary custom advantages, compliance, security, etc.

    Public cloud does little to address the enterprise need for control, hence the success of private cloud (even as a relabeling exercise) with a TAM of roughly $50B. AWS revenues are about $4B according to estimates.

    Of course, cloud has been one gigantic renaming exercise from the beginning (MaaS- or misinformation as a service) as it goes back to how POTs was once described and closely resembles a new twist on IBM timesharing from earlier.

    Perhaps comparing AWS to the third party retail and wholesale colocation industry might be more apt (AWS could be called a new version of colocation, etc). If that is the case there are at least a dozen service providers, hosting companies that will likely offer there own twist on specialized IaaS (hybrid cloud) aimed at giving enterprises more control and security with public cloud agility, protection, scale, etc.

    If you read my blog on SDN I think you'll concur that we are all saying the same thing about the ultimate triumph of software, etc.

    http://bit.ly/ZYW1Qu

    Thanks for the comments. G
    Apr 16 07:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Pigeonhole Problem [View article]
    If you look at how much is being spent on private versus public clouds you can see that there is an imbalance. The question is then: why are enterprises spending more heavily on private cloud? What is your answer?
    Apr 12 07:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Paradox [View article]
    JU: good point. A hybrid cloud requires a hybrid infrastructure or else it is a "two car garage" of two isolated clouds with two unique sets of limited (forms of) agility, protection and scale versus an integrated hybrid cloud. Thanks for the comment! G
    Apr 3 11:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Pigeonhole Problem [View article]
    My apologies. Had a minor error with my submission. I have no stake in Amazon... and AWS is a small portion of their overall business.
    Apr 1 11:55 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Pigeonhole Problem [View article]
    I think you are confusing the points I am making about the public cloud shortcomings today as disagreement with your blog's thesis, which is not the case. I think the point is that hybrid cloud (agility, economics, protection/reliability AND control) is a natural evolution of cloud computing, from the confines of public and private cloud. Cloud is a superior operating model. Yet it has not been embraced by the enterprise to the extent that private cloud and 3rd party colocation, etc has been. Essentially, concerns about SLAs, security... control. Amazon has developed a price-centric service business. Service. That service needs to evolve to cater to enterprise key requirements, which are not just based on costs/price. BTW- excellent points about the evolution from hardware to software-centric.. and eventually service-centric offerings.
    Apr 1 11:54 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Pigeonhole Problem [View article]
    My point was that Amazon could be much more successful if they marketed to enterprise IT versus simply "low cost infrastructure on our terms at a low cost." The private cloud market dwarfs the public cloud market when it comes to the number and size of deployments. Why?
    If you have less control in the public cloud than the private cloud, then cost is a secondary control for many types of apps and services. Secondly if the onboarding of the existing app is risky and costly, then fewer existing apps will be onboarded. Clearly there is a case for Amazon to go hybrid and give enterprises the agility and protection they need with the controls they require.

    I do appreciate your comment. And I do realize that for some apps and many smaller organizations the public cloud is true innovation.
    Apr 1 11:49 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Amazon's AWS And The Public Cloud Paradox [View article]
    Yes. Betting against Amazon is a risky move.
    Mar 30 09:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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