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  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    5.43% of 4% of my portfolio = .2% total cost to my portfolio. That's something I am willing to live with. especially considering it has a current 6% plus yield.
    Jul 14, 2015. 08:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    the ETF's to which you refer in my portfolio are AMLP, PGX, and HYD. I will speak as to why I own those three in specific and Why I prefer them over direct investments in their corresponding sectors. Please remember that each of these investments represent no more than 4% of my portfolio
    AMLP:
    I don't believe in any one specific MLP company but rather the industry as a whole. So rather than try to pick winners and losers I want to hedge my bets by betting on the overall success of the business model more than anything else. Owning MLP's outright makes tax season a veritable nightmare or which I have been through before. I would rather have the taxes paid and not have to worry about the paperwork for this I am willing to sacrifice a minute amount of profit.
    PGX:
    When it comes to the financial sector I am a huge fan of the recurring income that these companies generate but rather than buy preferred shares of anyone specific company again I prefer to hedge my bets and capture preferred share income across a boarder spectrum of companies. The management costs that I pay is really an insurance policy that I am willing to pay to not have to track the index myself.
    HYD:
    Much like that of the finance industry being unable to pick one better company over another I do not want to decide which municipalities I think will succeed in the long term. I am a fan of macro-economic factors and do not take the time to understand local economic issues. For that reason I do not choose to invest in anyone specific municipal bond investment but rather choose to spread my risk out over a much larger swath of municipal debt instruments. Inevitably cities like Detroit will have issues that were unthinkable 15 years ago and I do not want to be left holding paper for a single entity and would rather hedge my bet's.

    I realize that I am incurring cost by having these three investments in my portfolio but the cost is only being incurred on 12% of my portfolio so it represents a miniscule amount of extra cost and a significant about of risk dispersal.
    Jul 9, 2015. 03:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    purchase price wouldn't be a problem current price is a problem because its time sensitive data and these article can take a day or two to be reviewed and published. I have a hard time putting time sensitive data on a page because people will start to poke wholes in the article if you are off by the least little amount +/- would be an interesting stat that I will consider but again the +/- of individual investments is not my goal and might distract from the income generation goal that I am trying to emphasize. Thanks for your feedback
    Jul 9, 2015. 02:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    I like WM's business model and in the consumer society that we live in the GRABAGE business can only become more profitable. I also like the methane recapture aspect of WM from their existing LandFill Operations. WMT in my opinion is a must have retailer. If you believe at all in a consumer society which the USA is then you must own a major retailer and I feel that WMT has better ability to weather market fluctuations than any other retailer. This is really a best of the worst pick for me.
    Jul 9, 2015. 09:16 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    I believe in the pipeline sector in general as a business model rather than anyone specific company. This is a larger bet on FRAC'ing more than it is on companies. I don't like to deal with commodity price fluctuations I would rather make a bet that the liquids keep flowing regardless of the price. I like the toll road and storage business model that MLP's offer. Also by owning the index my tax documents in the spring are a lot easier to put together owning MLP's can make tax documents a pain to fill out and cost more money than they make you.
    Jul 9, 2015. 09:13 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    Its controversial and disputed because people don't view a time based value assessment of money as a viable metric. They assume that you would have been seeking future return value on your money in the first place so backwards looking value metrics are essentially useless fluff. That is what I have heard from many readers on my previous articles. you can go back to my older articles and read the YOC comments almost everyone of them has at least 1 negative detractor of the YOC statistic.
    Jul 9, 2015. 09:10 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    I only place stop loss orders on stock that have increased by more than 30% and I rebuy at a lower capital rate and take the profits and diversify into other investments. Basically I use stopliss orders as a vehicle for profit capture used for diversification.
    Jul 8, 2015. 10:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q2 2015) [View article]
    I have looked at name overseas but look at whats happening in china and look at the currency problems with a strong dollar and euro exchange rates and I just have a hard time swallowing addiotnal levels of risk in terms of relative performance. For now I am happy to stay US, if China gets cheap enough I may look at some bargains there but for now I think I am gonna stay put with US companies.
    Jul 8, 2015. 01:02 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    I actually will disagree with your assessment. most of their variable rate loans are held with MM Middle Market companies, these companies are larger than LMM companies and can afford to pay the increase in floating rate payments. LMM companies are less likely to be able to pay increasing rates due to the size of their companies. I would rather the smaller companies exist at a fixed rate so that the chance of default is almost non-existent. I would rather get consistent payments even if eroded by interest rate margins rather than no payments from a defaulted company. The NAV gain will come from the fact that the MM companies are the companies MAIN has financed with floating rate loans so that NAV will continue to grow and benefits will be had from the interest rate increase when it comes.
    Jul 8, 2015. 11:00 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    Don't agree yahoo is very good at historical data. MAIN/s website assumes its numbers based on all future payments that it has declared but not yet paid. they have declared through September but have not paid those dividends yet obviously so until the money is paid I do not count it as a return. MAIN is forward looking from a dividend payment output status Yahoo is historical as of today, and until its history I don't want to consider it.
    Jun 23, 2015. 11:34 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    LMM's offer greater potential return due to increased equity stakes MM are more seeking just financing options and the equity stake in those companies is sometimes non-existent. they simply appear to use MM companies as a hedged insurance bet on the more risky LMM companies that have a greater potential for return.
    Jun 23, 2015. 11:30 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    clearly this is closer to the simple interest calculations of 25% return as opposed to the 15% estimate that was offered in contrary.
    Jun 23, 2015. 11:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    I understand your CAGR values and yes that is another way to analyze but, I am looking at a simple total gain return. not all future value increases are guaranteed. simply put If you had $15 8 years ago and did nothing with it you would still have $15 today(time would have eroded your buying power and the $15 would have been worth even less) but if you had invested in main the simple fact is your $15 8 years ago is now worth 45.89 non-compounded (I assumed people would have kept the cash). if you want to analyze based return based upon a compounded return, then in my opinion you would have to have rolled the 14.54 in cash payments back into the investment on a monthly basis and then calculated what your total cash value in the investment would have been today. If you treat the cash as compounded then CAGR analysis would work however for my scenario the cash was treated as non-compounded which is why I stuck with simple interest analysis. so technically its not wrong I just chose the simpler analysis based upon how dividends were treated.
    Jun 23, 2015. 11:23 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    You are assuming a compounded annual return. I look at an average annualized return. the math is simple total gain above original share price $45.89(total investment value) - $15(original cost) = 31.60. (31.60 / 15) = %210 percent return on your original investment. %210 / 8( years it has traded). Gives you a little over a 25% return on you original investment amount.
    Jun 21, 2015. 08:20 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Main Street Capital: An Investment For All Interest Rate Environments [View article]
    You bring up a very valid point. I reviewed there loan portfolio a large portion of their portfolio was committed to oil/gas but they were not specifically exploration or extraction companies and since midstream companies more rely on volume of product being consumed (which everything is pointing to increased global consumption above previous estimates) i actually think most of those companies stand to benefit from the current oil market environment. So I decided not to speak about that at this point in time.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:57 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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