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  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    I do appreciate the comments both positive and negative because I can take constructive criticism through detractors. It makes me rethink my message and I feel that I have learned of a necessity to communicate the goals of this portfolio in a slightly different manner in future updates. either way please keep the comments coming both positive and negative I appreciate all feedback. It helps me write better articles for you the readers.
    Apr 2, 2014. 12:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    According to my research I still have 4-5 sectors of the economy of which I have no exposure. The only segment that I may see I am overly diversified in is potentially the financial sector if you consider PGX and HYG as part of the financial sector. pair those with MAIN and AFL and WFC and I would probably agree that I am overweight that sector. If however there is a sector to be overweight I would argue that the finance sector would be that sector.
    Apr 2, 2014. 12:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    essentially you are doing the same thing that I am i try to keep transaction costs to around 1%. I do feel that is a reasonable charge for this type of service. Obviously the more you invest the lower this cost will be.
    Apr 2, 2014. 12:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Yes I do, in fact all of my cash back rewards that I earn on my credit cards goes straight into my brokerage account balance.
    Apr 2, 2014. 12:28 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Exactly which is why I would tell investors to shop around for brokerage services because there are definitely values to be had based upon your investing strategy.
    Apr 2, 2014. 12:27 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Before Christmas it was trending up slightly around 2% deviation from the average daily price but when the correction in february hit I gain significantly downward due to the 2-3 week long price fall. right now we are back to around where we were at the end of last year and because of my february purchases I own stocks for about 5-6% less than if I had bought them at their price levels in november-december. I try to make 1 to two scheduled purchases each month, 2 if the price drops 1 if the price rises. this ensures that I buy more on the downs than the ups.
    Apr 2, 2014. 12:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    I understand your point and as I have addressed above in many comments I am not seeking to be another buy these 8-10 stocks for your income portfolio. There are numerous other portfolios out there (on this site even) that use that model, I would be offering nothing different than what is already provided. Again I am taking a look at this income seeking portfolio from the view of a 29 year old. This is an dividend income growth portfolio for younger investors, and I am beginning to think that this may be the confusion point for alot of my readers. I will seek to clarify this in further articles. Thanks for the feedback.
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:46 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Yes I agree with your general premise and I am glad that you asked this question because while I agree with your statement I also look at this slightly different since I just turned 29 last year YOC means more for my long term outlook than most people that are focused on dividend income investing. for me YOC is a time based justification as to why to save money in this manner.

    Yes I agree that current yield is an important metric for people who are solely seeking current income level who may be in retirement or approaching retirement. I however am 30+ years from retirement so current yield is not as important to me as much as dividend growth rate is. I would rather own a dividend paying company that pay 2% and raises its dividend by 11% yearly instead of a company that pays a 3% dividend but only raises its dividend 4% per year. before long the aforementioned 2% yield company will overtake the 3% payer on a YOC basis which is also one of the reasons that I prefer YOC.

    I guess the reason this may seem strange for alot of people is that generally you don't see investors under the age of 30 focused on dividend income investing. I personally invest in this manner because I feel it is the only way that an average everyday person can invest and not be hurt by wall street's musings
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:40 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    I can understand your point but as I explained above I have a slightly different view of risk than alot of other dividend income seeking investors which is why I am going this route. If you look back at my original pilot article you will see my investing pattern.
    buy 10 stocks with $500 cost basis
    raise all 10 stocks to $1000 cost basis
    buy 5 more stocks (15 total) with $1000 cost basis
    raise all 15 stocks to $1500 cost basis
    buy 5 more stocks (20 total) with $1500 cost basis
    raise all 20 stocks to $2000 cost basis
    buy 5 more stocks (25 total) with $2000 cost basis
    raise all 25 stocks to $2500 cost basis
    Etc.....

    Continue on this path until you can longer find dividend stocks worth owning.

    I understand that this is a different investment style than most other dividend income investors which is part of the reason I chose to document my portfolio in this manner. anyone can tell you what 12 dividend stocks to buy. I am looking to offer an alternative view and approach to dividend/income portfolio investing.
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:30 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Thank you sir for explaining SB's pricing model, and yes they did change their pricing model. If you have been paying for it you were grandfathered in. The new pricing model is 3.95 for automatic investment actions meaning you would have to purchase $400 of an automatic investment to equal out to the old model which is still not unreasonable should you really consider it.
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:24 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Ok I understand your point and I would like to offer counter points to your observations at least as I see them.
    1) Even though this is an income centric portfolio I believe in distribui9nt my risk over many sectors/companies. I also consider risk in a slightly different manner because I and not only looking at DRIP but also dividend increases. Also I don't directly drip back into the same stock, I take dividend payments from all of my stocks and then use that capital to in return diversify my investments.
    Example 1: What is the difference in owning $5,000 of 1 company that pays a 3% dividend or owning $2,500 of two companies that also pay a 3% dividend. answer=there is no difference.
    Example 2: What if that one company that I own 5,000 dollars of fails to raise their dividend in one year the hit on my portfolio growth percentage wise would be twice that of the second scenario should only one of the 2 companies fail to raise their dividend.

    I have thereby distributed my dividend growth risk across multiple companies.

    Generally I am seeking income yes but I am also seeking to be less volatile than most portfolios. So in a sense yes I agree with you I am trying to build my own income centric mutual fund (Minus the management fees of course) because I believe that betting a limited number of companies further exposes you to undue risk should one of your 8-12 companies have a sub-par event occur. Impact of negative events will hurt your scenario more than mine where I have my risk distributed across more companies. I will also have to acknowledge that even though my risk is spread thinner because I own more companies I also have a higher chance that some negative aspect could affect my portfolio than you do because I own more companies, but that is a personal decision I have chosen to live with.

    There are pro's and con's either way, the key is identifying your investor mentality and deciding what approach fits best with your risk level posture.
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:21 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    I actually thought the same thing that you did about price spikes and overcharging. I have monitored the sales over time and generally the purchases are made around 11:00 AM on the day they were scheduled and more often than not the trade is withing .5% of the share price at 11:00 AM so that is a satisfactory deviation from my standpoint.
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:07 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    You definitely have to shop around for your brokers because certain brokerage services charge outrageous transaction fee's. You should definitely compare rates for many brokerage services before settling on one.
    Apr 2, 2014. 10:05 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Sharebuilder allows you to buy partial shares through their automatic investment plan. please check out sharebuilder because it sounds like alot of you who comments on comissions above are getting severely overcharged.
    Apr 1, 2014. 09:28 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Income Portfolio Quarterly Update (Q1 2014) [View article]
    Thanks for the support I have answered those questions above. based on my current investment structure I basically pay 1% in total commissions for all trades which is minimal. I make more money by dollar cost averaging my investments than I lose in commisions. I feel bad for anyone who has to pay more than $7 for real time trade. if you currently pay more than that please check out sharebuilder you are getting overcharged!!!!!!

    I will have to look at GEK I like HYG but only because I plan on interest rates rising later this year and into next year which will make the yields on junk bonds rise. this should in turn devalue hyg allowing me to buy more shares at a lower price. I like HYG's broad market exposure but I will have to look into GEK.

    Thanks
    Apr 1, 2014. 09:27 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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