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Jarrod W. Jacinth

 
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  • Wait For Occidental Petroleum's Plans Before Jumping In [View article]
    Thank you for pointing this out. It was an error on my part. I have submitted a correction.
    May 30 01:13 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should You Feed Your Portfolio With This Food Maker? [View article]
    Dave,

    Yes if you already own it there is no reason to sell. At this point there are other opprotunities out there to buy into.

    Jarrod
    May 27 02:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Benjamin Graham's Rules For The Common Stock Component: Marathon Petroleum Corporation [View article]
    MPC fails 3,4, and 5 as it is a spin off and does not have the stand alone record. If we account for Marathon Oil prior to the spin off it passes.
    May 25 11:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Benjamin Graham's Rules For The Common Stock Component: Marathon Petroleum Corporation [View article]
    David,

    Thank You for your comment. This was brought to my attention and will be the last with this template. My apologies.

    My goal in this series of articles is to take a set framework and assess a stock based on a common denominator to objectively investigate a stock.

    I find that many articles found on the internet are looked at with varying frameworks. In many cases the same company is looked at various ways from the same analyst. This leads me to believe that the author is trying to, in a way convince themselves and others a stock is a good pick by making an argument for a conclusion they have already made.

    In a world where trading is more popular than investing; it is difficult to relay a message that analyzing a stock, even based on a time-proven framework is something that works in today's world.

    All the Best,

    Jarrod
    May 24 10:34 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Price Volatility: Broken Windows And Activist Investors [View article]
    I am trying to explain a phenomenon that occurs. This past week we saw Sony increase by up to 10% after Daniel Loeb announces a stake in the company.

    We know that Sony has issue with product lines (XBox and iPod). Mr. Loeb makes an announcement and the stock jumps. Nothing fundamentally has changed yet, simply some one coming and saying I'm going to fix Sony (by splitting it up).

    Investors can certainly sell their shares after a price jump. But what happens if the prices go up after some one comes in and announces they will fix the company, but nothing happens then what?

    I was trying to connect the dots for some investors as to why some stocks behave in such a manner by comparing it to an empirically proven social phenomenon.

    Jarrod
    May 19 08:16 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Benjamin Graham's Rules For The Common Stock Component: National Oilwell Varco [View article]
    A P/E of 25 averaged for EPS of the past 7 years.
    May 17 06:48 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Benjamin Graham's Rules For The Common Stock Component: National Oilwell Varco [View article]
    Graham expected earnings to grow over time. So eps six or seven years ago should be lower than the last twelve months. He expected earnings to double every 10 years at least. At the same time he knew that there are also good years and bad years.
    May 16 06:16 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How 'Old Money' Can Build Wealth For The Average Person [View article]
    WM,

    Thank you for your comment. I'm 34 and tend to write with a target viewership of people who are still in the stages of building their portfolios and wealth.

    I'm sorry to read about the money you lost with Lehman Brothers but it should not sour you all together on lower paying dividend stocks.

    During the crash of 2008 I know of many people who lost just as much as you, except in REITS. The sell was a high dividend yield, but because of the business they were in simply could not fend off the crash. Personally, I like HCP and NLY. I would not suggest reinvesting dividends when in REITS they can be a great way to produce immediate income once some one is in retirement.

    All the Best,

    Jarrod
    May 12 01:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How 'Old Money' Can Build Wealth For The Average Person [View article]
    Yes, sorry it's $4 @ 3.2%
    May 12 12:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement In A World Without Social Security: Follow Up [View article]
    The link I provided states that the disability portion of SS is going under in 2016.

    I would make the same argument as I have for SS retirement.

    Save Your Money!

    It is unfortunate some of the circumstances that people are required to be on disability. However, there seems to be a factor in our culture that we continue to trick ourselves that bad things won't happen.

    Prepare for the worst and hope for the best. I truly believe it also has to do with how some parents raise their kids.

    I remember when I had my first job. I had money sitting around simply because I was still in high school and drove a 1981 VW Quantum....remember those?

    Any way, I started talking with my mother as I was interested in investing at age 17. "That Woman" informed me that the stock market is a horrible place and I would lose all my money.

    My son is 5 and I am instilling, or at least trying to, how investing money as opposed to buying crap is a solid life long decision. However, it is difficult as all he talks about are transformers right now. So I have to be creative and change my language so he understands, to a point.
    May 4 10:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement In A World Without Social Security: Follow Up [View article]
    A pension due to working in the public sector? as well as SS?
    May 4 09:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Use Your Tax Refund To Start Your Retirement Savings [View article]
    The original 10 sectors I used are derived from the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS), also used by the S&P 500. The 10 sectors are:
    Energy
    Materials
    Industrials
    Consumer Discretionary
    Consumer Staples
    Health Care
    Financials
    Technology
    Telecom
    Utilities

    Under the sector Industrials we have 3 Sub-sectors:
    Capital Goods
    Commercial and Professional Services
    Transportation

    Norfolk Southern is Transportation
    Apr 29 11:09 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Star Trek Shaped My Retirement Perspective [View article]
    That is one of the best things about a solid company with a growing dividend. When the stock is down you can either add to your position or if you get a dividend payout reinvested, you are able to purchase more shares than if the equity price is up.

    Then more dividends are then compounded on top of that.
    Apr 25 12:23 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Star Trek Shaped My Retirement Perspective [View article]
    The problem with an index fund is that they are made simply to mirror whatever index they are comprised of. With The three stocks I currently have positions in the dividends are expected to increase.

    Wal-Mart has a 25% annualized dividend growth rate since it's inception, that is equivalent to receiving a 25% raise a year.

    A $10,000 position with a 2.5% yield starts off with $250 payout. At say 20% growth we see:
    300
    360
    432
    518

    and so on, after 20 years we get the $10,000 back annually in dividends, if the dividends for the past 20 years are not reinvested and the position is not added to.

    If the dividends are reinvested and position is added to, say the annual May/ June dip; then the returns are exponentially larger.
    Apr 25 12:20 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement In A World Without Social Security [View article]
    The dividend growth rate is what this article was originally about in it's first draft. The question of Suvivorship Biased continued to come up so I scrapped the article as it was declined to be published.

    With the parameters of $5000 a year, increases for inflation. With an 8% dividend growth and 8% return on equity I had an almost 4 million dollar portfolio with half a million in dividends a year after 30 years. Assuming the stocks were able to perform as such for 30 years.
    Apr 23 01:02 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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