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Joe Eqcome

 
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  • Dividend Yields For S&P 500 Will Rise [View article]
    Alan Young:

    Thank you,

    However, you did not read the article carefully enough--or thoroughly enough:

    One:

    1: The ages of 65+ or over are going to increase.

    2: The S&P in going to increase so that income investors will be rewarded. The dividend yield to earning yield ratio is 32.4% today and the average 1942 to today in 47.8%.

    3: Bond yields are going to collapse.

    4: Equity yields will be the bond yields in the next 5 to 10 years.

    Two:

    The dividend yield was below the earning yield before the WWI and the Great Depreciation--not actual the events.

    Three:

    The bond dividend yields (quantitative easing) is below the equity yield. Your argument does seem to matter, if quantitative has run its course .

    Best,
    Joe Eqcome
    Sep 30, 2013. 01:15 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Putting Annuities In Their Place: Fidelity Personal Retirement Annuity [View article]
    wkirk500,

    Would you comment on the immediate annuities and the states that action was taking?

    Joe Eqcome
    Sep 13, 2013. 03:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CEF Weekly Review: The 'Last Picture Show' [View article]
    Rodneysw

    Thanks.

    Joe Eqcome
    Aug 22, 2013. 03:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • BlackRock's CoRI(TM) Retirement Index: How Much Cash Flow For Your Retirement [View article]
    John,

    Approximately 33% invested in equity. The core of the portfolio is invested in treasury and US treasuries STRIP.

    I believe the TIPS is in the inflation calculations of whether the bonds prices will go up or down.

    Joe
    Aug 22, 2013. 02:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CEF Weekly Review: The 'Last Picture Show' [View article]
    Thanks
    Aug 18, 2013. 09:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Social Security Benefit Strategies Against The S&P 500 [View article]
    Trinebeens

    The first example is 62. That is the time you can apply for social security. There is a discount to the FRA (66). (This is 25% discount.)

    The second is 66. This is the time you can applied for Social Security at your FRA age. (100% of your social security)

    The second is 70. This is if you can for go the 66 to 70 social security, your social security increase to 132% of your 66 Social Security).

    The break even age is 82 to 85 depending on your choices. The choice are $200,000 as of 85.

    Joe Eqcome
    Aug 15, 2013. 04:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Social Security Benefit Strategies Against The S&P 500 [View article]
    EscotericPath,

    While your taxes at 62 with make you eligible for taxes, the money will likely come back to you in the future when your are FRA.

    Joe Eqcome
    Aug 14, 2013. 05:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CEF Weekly Review: JH Financial Opportunities [View article]
    Scooter-Pop,

    There are two things that cause me concern:

    1. The tapper off of government bonds. The CEF munis have a lot of leverage invested in muni bonds.

    2. The Detroit bonds "bomb shells" that all government bonds will be treated as general obligation.

    However, there are some unleveraged muni bonds: NIM, MTT and MHF.

    Joe Eqcome

    Aug 5, 2013. 09:57 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Portfolios May Not Be The Whole Answer [View article]
    Ruralist,

    Thank you.

    Joe Eqcome
    Jul 29, 2013. 01:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Portfolios May Not Be The Whole Answer [View article]
    Ruralist

    The S&P 500 has provided an upward bias since Sept 2009.

    Both SDY and DVY may have conveyed and “upside” bias during that periods. This is why we have developed a trough (Sept 2009 and Oct 2011) to judge the gains from July, 17, 2013.

    Certainly, dividends and long-term capital gains are distinct. However, the long-term capital gains are 15% and the dividends rates are 15%. This is just a fact.

    It is this upward bias has long-term capital gains success over distributions. If this upside bias trend does take place, dividends can deliver the “upside” in a “down” markets.

    Joe Eqcome
    Jul 29, 2013. 01:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Portfolios May Not Be The Whole Answer [View article]
    DG Ruralist,

    Stocks of the “Dividend Portfolio” were already allocated along with distributions. The initial portfolio manager was not an issue.

    What I was trying to do is compare it to the cyclical trough (9/09 and 10/11).

    When I looked at the “Sept 2009 trough” the Portfolio clearly posted a winner and outpaced SDY by large cumulative margin (146% by 106%, respective.) However, much of the gained was with KFN (1,155% gain and a weight gain of 46%).

    On the “October 2011 trough”, the weighted Portfolio gain was 18.6% and SDY was 30.7%.

    If you were to take the distributions of 1.5% (Portfolio’s 5.0% less SDY’s 3.5% = 1.5%) for two year’s (1.5% X 2 = 3.0%) and subtract it from the SDY less the two year portfolio and then subtracting it by the Portfolio (30.7% - 3.0% = 27.7% - 18.6% = 9.1%) you would have gained a 9.1% by investing in SDY.

    Capital gains are the same thing as dividend income because capital gains (long-term) and income are 15% (less than $400,000 a year ($450,000 if married).

    Dividend rates for O and NLY are “pass though” and get tax at a high rate.

    Joe Eqcome
    Jul 25, 2013. 05:46 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CEF Weekly Review: First Trust Energy Infra Fund [View article]
    Edit of Perish

    The PrcNAVSprd has a week to week value. This is why "PDI" had a negative value.

    Your statistics may make sense for a 52 weeks.

    However, the annual expense ratio of 2.87% is a little steep.

    Joe Eqcome
    Jul 15, 2013. 12:28 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Is Cornerstone Progressive Return Fund So Attractive? [View article]
    notaexpert

    5 years after (2009), the stock price has careered around 9.4% annually and the NAV per share has declined by 6.2% annually.

    Yes, this is "risk" money.

    But I'm affair that the many investors (income investors) don't know that.

    Joe Eqcome
    Jul 15, 2013. 11:58 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CEF Weekly Review: Gabelli Convertible & Income Fund [View article]
    Sting71,

    That's the stock markets!

    Joe Eqocme
    Jul 11, 2013. 12:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CEF Weekly Review: Gabelli Convertible & Income Fund [View article]
    Sting71,

    You must be quite prescient to have had a $9.88 price on 11/15/12. That was the low of the day! And low of any year-to-date.

    My argument is that it may go down--don't know, but it is likely.

    I have written of the stock as it was $12.95 per shares and above. http://seekingalpha.co...

    So, that's my case in point.

    Joe Eqcome
    Jul 10, 2013. 04:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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