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  • Apple's (AAPL) share of the U.S. smartphone market surged in Q4, jumping from 26% to 43%, mostly at the expense of Android (GOOG), which slipped from 60% to 47%. Blackberry (RIMM) continues its slide, hitting 6% compared to 8% in Q3 and 19% a year earlier.  [View news story]
    Wow - Go APPLE!
    Jan 10 10:22 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Steve Jobs' total compensation in 2011: $1. New CEO Tim Cook's total 2011 compensation: $378M. Most of Cook's compensation is made up of restricted Apple (AAPL) stock that vests over the next ten years.  [View news story]
    How do shareholders contribute value to Apple? Let me give you a hint, they don't. That's why you compensate performing executives - they are the ones creating value.

    I, and obviously the board of directors, really don't see a problem with having executives compensated for creating value at Apple. Keep in mind that as long as those executives are creating value, the shareholder will benefit with increased business value - market cap. It's a win win. Don't knock executive pay when you refuse see the merit.
    Jan 10 09:58 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Steve Jobs' total compensation in 2011: $1. New CEO Tim Cook's total 2011 compensation: $378M. Most of Cook's compensation is made up of restricted Apple (AAPL) stock that vests over the next ten years.  [View news story]
    As long as Apple performs well under Tim Cook's leadership, there is nothing wrong with that kind of compensation. Would be curious to know what his compensation was for 2010 and other prior years.
    Jan 10 09:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Steve Jobs' total compensation in 2011: $1. New CEO Tim Cook's total 2011 compensation: $378M. Most of Cook's compensation is made up of restricted Apple (AAPL) stock that vests over the next ten years.  [View news story]
    Sorry but anyone refraining from buying Apple or pissed at Apple because they don't have a dividend is a silly investor. The smart investor makes money on Apple stock because Apple grows and the business appreciates in value - think market cap.
    Jan 10 09:26 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's mobile ecosystem wars bear similarity to the 1990s operating system wars which, like now, had a "winner-take-all flavor," writes Holman Jenkins. Netscape and antitrust regulators changed all of that - could Apple's (AAPL) cloud move (and again antitrust) do the same? "The future may be friendlier to Blackberry (RIMM), Nokia (NOK), and Windows Phone (MSFT) than it now appears."  [View news story]
    Here's a recent article on iPhone vs Android demand and consumer satisfaction: http://macw.us/y6o6ye
    Jan 9 06:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In a season filled with chipmaker warnings, Cirrus Logic (CRUS) is preannouncing in the opposite direction: the company says it expects FQ3 revenue of $122M, well above a consensus of $105.1M, and is also guiding for FQ4 revenue of $105M, above a $98.5M consensus. Cirrus' announcement could be another indication of strong iPhone demand, given it supplies an audio codec chip for the 4S. Shares +7.4% AH.  [View news story]
    Analysts should just estimate Apple's iPhone 4S sales at 50 million units for the 1st Quarter and call it a day. That way the analysts could just sit back, stop updating their estimates daily and wait for actual numbers.
    Jan 9 05:27 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's mobile ecosystem wars bear similarity to the 1990s operating system wars which, like now, had a "winner-take-all flavor," writes Holman Jenkins. Netscape and antitrust regulators changed all of that - could Apple's (AAPL) cloud move (and again antitrust) do the same? "The future may be friendlier to Blackberry (RIMM), Nokia (NOK), and Windows Phone (MSFT) than it now appears."  [View news story]
    Emotions in business can be a good thing. They allow you to get onto the same level as the consumer. Seeing, feeling and experiencing what they do. Taking a third person look at myself, I can see how Apple has changed my world over the past 3 years. I find their products simple, stylish, innovative and never lacking quality. I'm hooked - always finding myself wanting their latest goodies.

    Reality is Apple's iPhone is looked at as more of a luxury item and Android as more of a commodity. Apple has created a simple phone buying structure whereas there's a plethora of Android phone options that are a bit all over the place.

    You said: "the point of Android. It's not to directly create revenue for Google. It's to make sure no one else creates a system where they can be locked out of access to search mobile/tv market." - That's like comparing Pepsi (Android) to Coke (Apple). Pepsi is thinking that people will like a second (and cheaper) option, but most people want the Coke. They don't want to compromise their refreshment experience.

    One of the bigger complaints a friend had, besides his Android phone's GPS not working, was that Android stopped doing software upgrades for his phone. His phone was no longer supported. End Game. I know you can say the same thing about the iPhone 3G (not S) iPhones, but technically Apple still sends out iOS software updates. It might not be able to run the latest iOS5, but it will still get security / firmware / bug fixes. Point is, the wonderful Android open-source-world has left people in the dark.

    Besides all of this going back and forth, I have to add that China loves Apple. My Chinese coworker goes to Hong Kong & Shanghai multiple times per year and says that the Chinese cannot get enough Apple Products. And recently, the Hong Kong government had too much money in its coffers, so what did they do? They gave about $700USD to all Hong Kong residents. Guess where that money is going?? ...Apple.

    Chinese people love, love, love luxury products. And that's what they consider Apple to be.

    In the long run, the American & European mobile market shares will probably be a moot point compared to what the Chinese market will eventually become.

    Oh, and one last thing about the non-tech savvy people getting Androids. I think that's fine. It's safe to say that as time goes on society as a whole gets more tech savvy, so I don't think Apple is losing much ground there. I mean, there are always people out there that won't use a smartphone to its full potential, just like many of my older family members.
    Jan 9 04:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's mobile ecosystem wars bear similarity to the 1990s operating system wars which, like now, had a "winner-take-all flavor," writes Holman Jenkins. Netscape and antitrust regulators changed all of that - could Apple's (AAPL) cloud move (and again antitrust) do the same? "The future may be friendlier to Blackberry (RIMM), Nokia (NOK), and Windows Phone (MSFT) than it now appears."  [View news story]
    I own Apple stock, so I've already made that bet.

    Where are these numbers showing Apple iPhone users switching to Free / Cheap Android phones? I highly doubt that is the case. You know the saying: Once you go Apple, you never go back.

    Ok, so you just said: "those who had been using Apple phones and now want to try something different" - well that's like fixing something that's not broken. What's the point? You want to use some 4Gs so you can drain your battery faster? Switching from an iPhone to an Android reminds me of my one ex gf - crazy.
    Jan 9 03:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Thanks partly to its leading share in the market for next-gen FCoE switches, Cisco (CSCO) is challenging Brocade's (BRCD) leadership position in the storage-area-networking (SAN) equipment market, claims Infonetics. Brocade, which had twice the market share of Cisco in late 2010, had only an 8-point lead as of Q3 '11. Brocade's switch revenue fell 4% Y/Y in its October quarter. (earlier)  [View news story]
    Go Cisco!

    Cisco trades "private industry" cheap. Look:

    a) 2011 Earnings = $6.5B
    b) Current Market Cap = $102B
    c) Cash on Hand = $45B
    d) Shares Outstanding = $5.4B

    e) Cash on Hand per Share = c / d = 45 / 5.4 = $8.33

    f) Business value without cash per share = (b - c) / d = (102 - 45) / 5.4 = 57 / 5.4 = $10.55

    g) Business without cash P/E = (b - c) / a = 57 / 6.5 = 8.76 P/E

    Most solid private businesses are purchased in the 6 - 8x earnings range. That would give Cisco a private value of around:

    (6 * a) + c = (6 * 6.5) + 45 = 39 + 45 = 84
    (8 * a) + c = (8 * 6.5) + 45 = 52 + 45 = 97

    $84-97B

    News flash - Cisco isn't private. Money Managers will eventually jump on this arbitrage.
    Jan 9 02:59 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Chinese government has approved an iPhone that appears to be built for China Telecom's (CHA) EV-DO 3G network. Thus far, Apple (AAPL) has only been able to officially sell the iPhone in the Middle Kingdom through China Unicom (CHU), though the 4S' inclusion of an EV-DO modem has led to widespread speculation (I, II) that China Telecom would be added as a partner.  [View news story]
    China Telecom is China's third-largest wireless carrier. This deal would put a decent increase in iPhone 4S sales that haven't even happened yet. What this deal is really going to do is provide other areas of China with the ability to use an iPhone, increase iPhone presence and now with new competition it gets rid of the monopoly effect and will benefit the consumer in pricing.

    Remember, cheaper pricing doesn't hurt Apple profits because the Carriers pay Apple for the iPhones, not the consumer.

    By the way, China Telecom has "117 million mobile subscribers, of which 28.43 million were 3G subscribers."

    Source - http://bit.ly/z7nPS5 (#2 tab)
    Jan 9 02:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple (AAPL +0.7%) hit a new record high of $427.75 earlier following fresh analyst optimism about its FQ1 results, and amid anticipation it will soon announce a new publishing deal or iPad. While the company has historically held January events for major announcements, there's been no word of any such gig this year.  [View news story]
    Android is like the Dell of the Computer Industry - Low-Cost Seller.

    And in most cases Android is Free. You get what you pay for people.
    Jan 9 02:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Digitimes Research estimates global notebook shipments fell 8.7% Q/Q in Q4, typically a seasonally strong quarter, thanks to the hard drive shortages caused by lost Thai manufacturing capacity. However, Apple's (AAPL) shipments are believed to have held steady, thanks in part to a 20% Q/Q shipment increase for the MacBook Air, which relies on flash memory for storage instead of a hard drive.  [View news story]
    Notebook sales didn't fall because of hard drives. They fell because Apple is shaking up the industry with their MacBook Air & iPads. It's as simple as that. No need to come up with other excuses.
    Jan 9 02:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's mobile ecosystem wars bear similarity to the 1990s operating system wars which, like now, had a "winner-take-all flavor," writes Holman Jenkins. Netscape and antitrust regulators changed all of that - could Apple's (AAPL) cloud move (and again antitrust) do the same? "The future may be friendlier to Blackberry (RIMM), Nokia (NOK), and Windows Phone (MSFT) than it now appears."  [View news story]
    There might be a lot of high end android phones, but I bet the majority are not buying them. They either hold out for a substantial discount or get them for free.

    And I honestly doubt that Google is making any money on their Nexus phones. Who care about making revenue. Anyone can make revenue. It's profit that matters in the business world. Nexus Profit - Cost = $0, or maybe even negative. Think Kindle Fire profit margins.

    My group of friends were HEAVY into their Samsung Android phones, but they will soon be switching over to Apple shortly. Their androids are buggy and not 100% working, and they have limited apps. Way too many Android phone options out there, promoting inner competition. (think ford/mercury sister cars) Sets Apple apart into it's own league.
    Jan 9 11:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's mobile ecosystem wars bear similarity to the 1990s operating system wars which, like now, had a "winner-take-all flavor," writes Holman Jenkins. Netscape and antitrust regulators changed all of that - could Apple's (AAPL) cloud move (and again antitrust) do the same? "The future may be friendlier to Blackberry (RIMM), Nokia (NOK), and Windows Phone (MSFT) than it now appears."  [View news story]
    RIMM is done. Blackberry is a horrible phone. I really don't even know how they have come this far. Actually I do know, businesses buy these phones for their employees as a work phone. It's not something most technically savvy people with a little common sense would buy for themselves, but they would be willing to accept it as a free work phone. Really, who wouldn't.
    Jan 9 09:49 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's mobile ecosystem wars bear similarity to the 1990s operating system wars which, like now, had a "winner-take-all flavor," writes Holman Jenkins. Netscape and antitrust regulators changed all of that - could Apple's (AAPL) cloud move (and again antitrust) do the same? "The future may be friendlier to Blackberry (RIMM), Nokia (NOK), and Windows Phone (MSFT) than it now appears."  [View news story]
    Where is the price war? Android is Free, Apple isn't. People are willing to pay for an Apple product and not for an Android. Sounds like Apple is the winner. Doesn't say much about your product when people are willing to pay nothing for it - Android. Looks something like this:

    Android market share is 50%, cost $0: 50% x $0 = $0.00
    Apple market share is 15%, cost $$$: 15% x $$$ = $$$
    Jan 9 09:43 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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