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Martin Rice

 
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  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    dk, thanks for the quote. It's a good line to keep in mind.

    Good luck in your retirement.
    Mar 23 07:10 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    TG, thanks for writing. I don't have the answer yet; the CPA is still working on my return. As soon as I find out I'll post the answer I got.
    Mar 23 07:09 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • This New Undervalued Dividend Stock Has Big Dividend And Earnings Growth Ahead In 2014 [View article]
    According to FASTGraphs, NYLD's 5 year estimated total return is -2.2%. Given that with the remarks by westelk and rustylwb, this does not seem to be a great investment.
    Mar 23 05:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    reh, later on I did some more calculations for the entire year 2013 because that's when I was really trading a lot working on reshaping the portfolio. I hadn't realized how many trades I did. Was really surprised.

    I did 134 trades and it cost me $1,065.00. I still don't think that's a bad investment if the trades result in a solid, safe income-producing portfolio.

    Thanks for writing.
    Mar 23 01:44 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Positive Psychology Of Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Thanks, L139. It's really good to hear what others are doing. I appreciate it.
    Mar 23 01:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Positive Psychology Of Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    gfmn, thanks for the reply. Makes a lot of sense and I appreciate it.
    Mar 23 01:36 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Positive Psychology Of Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Me, too.
    Mar 23 01:26 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    Hi, Gary. I think I said that I'm not sure of what she'd think of another tobacco stock. I know she doesn't like the fact that we're in MO, but we are so she's OK. Given that, I'm sure she wouldn't like to get another one.

    That's what I meant. Sorry I wasn't clear.

    Hmmm, I wonder whether I could sweet-talk her into increasing our MO holding rather than acquiring PM . . ..?

    Thanks for the comment.
    Mar 23 01:25 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    Thanks for the comments, royk01. I agree with you about RTN. Also, yes, we do have some more cash -- not a great deal, but some more, however, I'm still looking for as many SWAN holdings as I can get. The less stress the better.

    I have no interest in bond funds or new, low interest bonds for the reasons you point out and with which I certainly agree.

    I did miss out on the high interest munis but still got in when they were paying about 5% which isn't too bad.

    Again, thanks for the comments.
    Mar 23 01:08 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    kor, thanks for commenting. Certainly your view of munis is a sensible one and that's why so many retired people have a much higher percentage of fixed income munis and preferreds than stocks in their portfolios.
    Mar 23 12:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    alphsim, thanks for commenting.

    I think the situation is a lot more complicated than the binary manner in which you're presenting it, that is, young low yield, old high yield.

    But, if we want to stick to binary, then I'd suggest it's just the other way around. When you're young and in accumulation mode, you can afford more risk because you have more time to recover. So go for higher yield with the associated higher risk and build your nest egg. Then, when you're older, take the much safer route of lower yield and lower risk because you don't have the time to recover. At the same time, if your lower risk, lower yield stocks are also DG stocks, you'll be able to keep up with inflation.
    Mar 23 12:54 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    Hi, bakermre, thanks for your reading and commenting.

    I'm not quite sure why you ask why I don't have technology or telecom stocks. I have 5 of them: CA, INTC, VOD, T, and VZ which make up more than 10% of my portfolio. In oil and gas I have COP and TOT. As far as the others, they're just not my cup of tea.

    Also, when you say "I agree, T and Verizon are not going anywhere safe," I'm not sure whom you're agreeing with. I didn't say that in the article. Perhaps it was in a comment I missed. I love T. I think they're safe and the dividend is very nice. Don't know much about VZ yet because I didn't buy them; I got them from the deal that VOD cut.

    I'm fine with RTN. I don't see their business going anywhere but up, just like their dividends which have increased every year for the last 9 years, including a couple of days ago.

    I appreciate your comments.
    Mar 23 12:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    sharon, thanks for writing. Wish I were in Madrid now. I'm a big Hispanic culture groupie. I lived in Costa Rica for almost 6 years -- some of the happiest in my life.

    You're completely right about the emotion involved in the RTN stock. But that's just going to have to be the way it is. It's really lucky that it's such a great stock with a very promising future, too. You can see what else I said about it and it's place in our portfolio in my reply to surfcove just below this comment.

    Reinvesting dividends is a great thing to do as so many writers here on SA can attest. But if you've reached the stage where you're relying on the income as we are, that's not much of an option. On the other hand, my wife has an IRA portfolio that we don't need to draw from and all her dividends are being reinvested.

    As far as being frugal is concerned, that's not my plan. I certainly don't want to be and am not a spendthrift. But we do have a certain lifestyle and it can't be called frugal. Fortunately at present, our combined income from SS, pensions, and investment income allows us to live that lifestyle without withdrawing from principal.

    Thanks for writing.
    Mar 23 12:13 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    surfcove, I agree with you about RTN. It is a quality company and pays good dividends, and as others have pointed out, has great prospects for the future. I really feel fortunate in having my "wife's pick" in the portfolio.

    What I am doing, however, based on DVK's comments, is recomputing all of my percentages without RTN, that is, percentages of a given name in the portfolio and given sectors. RTN will be gravy. Once the recomputations are done (today) I'll have a more realistic sense of the balance in our portfolio.

    I'm one of those people who really never look back, not just in relation to investments but almost in relation to everything. It's a futile, self-defeating, stress-causing exercise to worry over what has happened in the past. In general, I believe, the healthiest thing to do is learn your lesson and move on.

    You are right, though, that you can always reacquire them. I've done that a few times.

    Thanks for reading and commenting.
    Mar 23 10:34 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How One Retiree Is Muddling Through Dividend Investing: Part VIII - A Year Later [View article]
    Raygun, although I haven't done it, I'm convinced that investing in low-cost, unmanaged index funds such as Vanguard funds is a sure fire way to eventually do very well in the market and will certainly reduce your need to watch so closely.

    Why don't you read up more on it and go for it?

    Good luck.
    Mar 23 10:27 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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