Seeking Alpha
View as an RSS Feed

Matt Smith  

View Matt Smith's Comments BY TICKER:

Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Why Saudi Oil Is Not Winning The Battle For Market Share [View article]
    Saudi is not necessarily targeting US production, its attempt to gain market share means lower prices could push out high cost production across the globe - from Canada to Norway, and more expensive projects such as deepwater, the Arctic.
    Jul 10, 2015. 07:08 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Saudi Oil Is Not Winning The Battle For Market Share [View article]
    Electricity consumption in the Middle East, and specifically in Saudi Arabia, has been rising in recent years due to economic expansion. The chart illustrates that the direct burn of crude oil in Saudi has been rising for a number of years (last year it was at the top of its 5-yr range), and my point is that this trend is going to continue.
    Jul 10, 2015. 07:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Saudi Oil Is Not Winning The Battle For Market Share [View article]
    Hi David - I wholly agree. The biggest impact of current low oil prices may not be felt for a few years, when new projects that were supposed to come online do not - because they have been cancelled.
    Jul 10, 2015. 06:57 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The U.S. Crude Conundrum [View article]
    The point I was trying to make was that these two elements of the crude market are only going to increasingly diverge, causing the views on crude prices to do the same.

    Is a fair point you make re other people talking about rigs / inventories - if you are not sick of this topic yet, you will be in three months!
    Feb 19, 2015. 07:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Chuck Bucks! [View article]
    I saw that too! It was out on Zero Hedge.

    A piece also appeared in the Wall Street Journal on Saturday. It said that consumers are being frugal, and ‘hanging onto roughly half of their gasoline savings. Another 25% is being used to reduce debt, while the rest is being spent on small purchases like groceries, clothing and fast food’. So in response to your question, it’s a bit of both. Full article here –
    http://on.wsj.com/1tIcEpp
    Feb 2, 2015. 08:34 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Will Oil Take Part In The Santa Rally? [View article]
    Hey airborne, thanks for the vote of support (by the way, did you know that I write on a weekly basis on my home site - the quirky nature of most of my posts mean they are not appropriate for this forum?).

    The correlation with the euro has broken down recently; we were more euro debt crisis-focused over the previous months, but the fiscal cliff is now overshadowing that for now, hence the divergence.
    Dec 5, 2012. 07:39 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Delta Air Lines Is Bakken Business [View article]
    Sorry Joe from the Beach - just saw your comment now.

    Yes, costs would be much lower to ship oil south by pipeline rather than rail - a fraction of the cost.

    Re jet fuel - no, it is not possible to produce jet fuel only. Delta has retrofitted the refinery to produce as much jet fuel as possible though.
    Oct 17, 2012. 10:21 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gasoline Prices Are Hurting The Economy, But Releasing Stocks From The SPR Would Be Crazy [View article]
    Please explain why my assumption is in error that the crack spread is more attractive for diesel than gasoline because there is more demand for it. Also, in reality, what has WTI got to do with the crack spread of US gasoline? WTI is an irrelevant benchmark for much of the US, whose cost is based off a global benchmark such as Brent. Only the minority who have physical access to WTI gain that pricing advantage.
    Mar 6, 2012. 08:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gasoline Prices Are Hurting The Economy, But Releasing Stocks From The SPR Would Be Crazy [View article]
    The crack spread is more attractive for diesel because there is more demand for it (relative to gasoline) - some of this demand is coming from exports to Latin America.

    There is no shortfall in gasoline, as highlighted by the chart in the article. Demand is weak, proven across a number of indicators. More gasoline is likely being produced as a biproduct of producing more diesel, as per my prior point.

    I wouldn't condone releasing 18 million barrels from the SPR, 180 millions barrels is ludicrous. As you say yourself, the US consumer is caught in the crossfire (ie, this is not caused by US fundamentals). Hence, there are other steps globally which need to be taken, such as Saudi increasing supply. An SPR release is a last ditch measure.
    Mar 4, 2012. 09:10 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gasoline Prices Are Hurting The Economy, But Releasing Stocks From The SPR Would Be Crazy [View article]
    hahaha....took me a couple of seconds to get that...hilarious!
    Mar 3, 2012. 07:40 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Gasoline Prices Are Hurting The Economy, But Releasing Stocks From The SPR Would Be Crazy [View article]
    Thanks mjohn! Here's the source, it's year-on-year:

    http://read.bi/vZ7XPI
    Mar 2, 2012. 07:56 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • An Energy Board Game To Explain The Future Of Natural Gas [View article]
    Associated gas made up approximately 25% of natural gas production in 2010 (EIA). With liquid rich plays ramping up, I tend to believe the estimates I am hearing that this number is now over 50%.
    Feb 23, 2012. 09:28 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10 Points To Consider When Examining The U.S. Quest For Energy Independence [View article]
    yep, I've got mad skills.
    Feb 23, 2012. 08:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10 Points To Consider When Examining The U.S. Quest For Energy Independence [View article]
    Thanks airborne.

    The Iran issue is putting a floor under prices at the moment for sure. It feels like deja vu to last year, where prices ran up until we got to such a point where high prices endangered a global economic slump (which we've obviously avoided, ahem).

    I think Opec is happy where prices are at. If they weren't we would know soon enough. As for the low dollar policy, that is only going to become more of an issue as the drumbeat builds for QE3.

    By the way, did you notice I am back to avoiding politics like the plague?!
    Feb 23, 2012. 08:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10 Points To Consider When Examining The U.S. Quest For Energy Independence [View article]
    I agree with both points. The LNG capacity issue is set to leave the DOE on a hiding to nothing. It is a nigh-on impossible call to make, trying to judge how much to approve when prices in Europe and Asia are (and will likely remain) a multiple of what NYMEX natural gas prices are.
    Feb 23, 2012. 08:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
37 Comments
25 Likes