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Michael Fitzsimmons

 
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  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    I agree - the regulation of natural gas fracking by the last and current administrations has been very poor and there were some big problems in specific locations. It sometimes seems like the US wants to repeat the environmental problems with coal with natural gas. But the least the US should do is capitalize on the good side of natural gas by using it in the transportation sector rather than merely lettting a handful of companies export it all to countries that are smart enough to do so.
    Sep 5, 2013. 07:41 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    I've done more than "admit" the Civic GX exists...I've written about it for over 5 years. Of course it doesn't sell as good as the gasoline version - there are few refueling stations and no economical home refueling appliance and loads of building regulations to deal with be local gas utilities can install them.

    "Free markets", please, if you think we have "free markets" in energy, you are simply fooling yourself. The Bush ethanol mandates and billions on "clean coal" were followed and expanded by Obama, and then the billions Obama spent on solar, battery, and EV manufacturers? This country could easily have a complete nat gas refueling infrastructure on the interstate highway system for what the last two administrations have wasted on every single alternative but natural gas transportation. And while the US doodles in the ridiculous, the EU and China are busily building a natural gas refueling infrastructure for the 21st century. Yet natural gas here is ~4x cheaper, we own the technology, and we have the nat gas pipeline distribution system connecting every metropolitan city. It's simply a no brainer.
    Sep 5, 2013. 07:36 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    kertch: How good has the oil payoff been over the last 40 years when the US has been importing it? At times the US has imported significantly more than 60% of consumption, and was importing close to that amount when oil reached ~$150/barrel. While oil was one of the main reasons the US became the most powerful country in the world, things changed drastically in the last 1970's and since that time oil has become the one of the single biggest reason for US economic decline and debt.

    Why wouldn't the US move away from oil while we are the biggest importer in the world, its imports about $1 billion a day from countries like Saudi Arabia and Venezuela, natural gas prices are $2 versus $3.60 for gasoline and $4 for oil, and we have an abundant domestic supply of it?

    As for US "international power and prestige", it seems it has lost much of that power & prestige over the oil war in Iraq and its constant meddling in the Middle East over oil. Now, Chinese companies produce more oil in Iraq than do US companies. I guess I find your arguments more backward looking than forward looking.
    Sep 5, 2013. 07:30 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Cliff. No worries, one thing I have learned about global warming is that view seldom change as a result of debate, so I will save us both the trouble. That said, I lived in Austin for 12 years. How full are those highland lakes these days? When was the last time they released water for the rice farmers downstream of Austin? The times are changing...and things across Texas are amongst the most severe anywhere....
    Sep 4, 2013. 08:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    In the big picture, we see China importing natural gas from its coastal LNG import terminals. Since China doesn't have a robust nat gas pipeline distribution system like the US, China is distributing natural gas in LNG form to the interior. But China is using natural gas in both long-haul trucks (in LNG form) to replace diesel (oil) as well as in ordinary cars and trucks (in CNG form) to replace gasoline (oil).
    Sep 4, 2013. 08:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    CO2 is only an issue to those of us who do not like what we see when we look at the global temperature trends, the weather extremes, the lowering snow pack in the Rockies, and the Arctic cap melting. Other than those reasons, and of course the cost of importing foreign oil and printing money out of thin air to pay for it, yeah, there's no arguments at all to think wisely about fuel use.
    Sep 4, 2013. 05:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Ray: I have the same investment aims: to make money. That is why this article talked about several companies to take advantage of a very large trend that is likely to continue for quite some time: natural gas transportation in China. Seeking Alpha would not have published this article (let alone make it an Editor's Choice) if they were not of the opinion that there was some investment advice worth considering in the article. Note the two natural gas commodity producers I mentioned (Conoco & Chevron) not only have large LNG projects in Australia that will benefit from supplying natural gas to China, they also have large oil projects that will benefit by supplying it to the United States. I am not sure where you came to the conclusion that natural gas has "few buyers", that simply is not the case. Natural gas is in high demand in Asia which is a big reason why recent prices were over $14/MMBtu there as opposed to under $4 in the US.
    Sep 4, 2013. 05:29 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    cyber: Sure the US overtook Russia as the largest producer of natural gas, and that is the reason it is so cheap and why the US should be using it in the transportation sector instead of gasoline, 50% of which is refined from foreign oil imports. The article wasn't saying that China has a superior energy infrastructure, it obviously does not. The article was pointing out that the Chinese (like the EU) are adopting NGVs at a much faster rate than the US despite the huge advantages the US has:

    * ~4x cheaper price for natural gas
    * an abundant supply
    * the technology to produce it and use it in the transportation sector
    * the most extensive natural gas pipeline distribution system in the world

    Yet the US would rather keep importing expensive, dirty, and foreign oil than to use its own abundant, cheaper, and cleaner natural gas. It makes no sense.
    Sep 4, 2013. 04:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Hi Global - I think it is a bipartisan effort to kill the bill. My information tells me there aren't enough votes in the Senate because members of both parties don't want it. As for natural gas transportation growth, it is growing very fast all over the world, just not fast enough in the US - which remains the world's largest importer of oil. The huge cost advantages of natural gas have been around for a few years now. Even if natural gas cost the same as gasoline, it would still be the right thing to do since it is a *domestic* supply instead of foreign. Yet the avg price of natural gas is $2 compared to $3.60 for gasoline and $4 for diesel. I mean the economics are hugely advantageous for natural gas today and oh by the way, we cut way down on CO2 emissions too.
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:56 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Hi Andy - and what about recharging the EVs with coal? 40% of US electricity is still generated by coal. Seems like that is a good way to exacerbate global warming since natural gas emits 50% less CO2 than does coal, and 100% less of the toxic particulates.
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:52 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Hi Casey - yeah, notice the two picks in the article (Chevron & Conoco) will win both ways: supplying LNG to China and high priced oil to the US.

    It appears we disagree on the export issue. I think the US should prioritize getting on natural gas transportation and cutting out foreign oil imports before exporting it. Else, the US is going to remain addicted to expensive, dirty, and increasingly foreign oil supplies as the decades roll by and will look up to see the EU and China running on cleaner, cheaper, and less scarce natural gas. Not a good competitive landscape for the 21st century in my opinion. While great for the exporters on US LNG, what about the ordinary American filling up with $10 gallon gasoline who doesn't even have an option to own and refuel an NGV?
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:50 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    MightyYar: well, that is a good point and others have made it. But is the long-term cost/benefit calculation really different? The US has been importing foreign oil for 4 decades. We are broke, and we are going further in debt everyday. The US now has a resource (natural gas) which can not only enable it to significantly reduce foreign oil imports, but also reduce the cost of refueling ($3.60 for gasoline, $2 for natural gas) for its citizens, and oh by the way, make a huge dent in CO2 emissions. At the same time, it would reduce the need to get involved in these ridiculous oil wars in the Middle East that never turn out like the US would like, but are still extremely expensive nevertheless. The cost/benefit analysis is extremely good for natural gas. The expense to build a natural gas refueling infrastructure would have a very quick payback and then all Americans would benefit for the next century. It's a no-brainer.
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:46 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Hi tiger777 - that's hard to believe. Everything I have seen indicates the extra cost of a LNG truck is quickly covered by the lower cost of the fuel. If these trucks hold a 200 gallon tank, and natural gas is $2 compared to $4 for diesel, that is $400/tank. And most long-haul truckers have volume level discounts for natural gas that enables them to pay less than $2/gallon. It's hard to imagine the economics are not there when there are so many long-haul truckers and companies switching over to natural gas to get off diesel...
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:41 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    Hi Ruffdog - whatever natural gas the US is importing from Canada is probably due more because of convenience than real need - the US is simply awash in natural gas.

    There are some companies already planning to build LNG export terminals (Kitimat) in the West Coast of Canada, and some permits have been obtained from the native peoples to drop a nat gas pipeline across their lands. Has the Kinder Morgan TransMountain pipeline expansion been approved and is it going forward? Thanks.
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nat Gas Transportation: China Is Trouncing The U.S. At Its Own Game [View article]
    HI David: I agree their are a lot city buses in the US running on natural gas (as are refuse trucks and fleets), but the same is true in China as well. And while the simple number of NGVs may not be a perfect measurement, I think you would agree that China having 10 times the number of NGVs than the US does, when natural gas here is ~4x cheaper, shows there is a pretty big problem here, right?
    Sep 4, 2013. 03:29 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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