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Mike Nadel  

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  • Long Kraft As The Heinz Merger Radically Transforms The Company [View article]
    poor:

    I'll see what happens. I have instructed my broker (Vanguard) to reinvest all dividends and so far they have never let me down in decades. But maybe this will be different. If they don't drip it, my commission is low, so no biggie.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 08:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Ventas Has Gotten Way Too Cheap With 30% Upside On Strong Fundamentals [View article]
    jason:

    Charlotte-based Carolinas Healthcare System, one of the largest hospital systems in the country, makes money hand over fist. They are a nonprofit but their profits have been so great the last few years that they have scrambled trying to figure out how to spend the money. They keep building new facilities and keep giving upper management double-digit pay hikes -- a bunch of them now carry seven-figure salaries. My wife is a nurse there and, for some reason, the big money doesn't filter quite that far down the food chain!

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 08:34 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    geekette:

    I often say I'm the luckiest guy I know ... so we have good fortune in common! Here's hoping that stays the case for, oh, the next half-century or so!!

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 06:13 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Long Kraft As The Heinz Merger Radically Transforms The Company [View article]
    Thanks AP. I'll look for your update (and for my divvy!).

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 06:11 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Long Kraft As The Heinz Merger Radically Transforms The Company [View article]
    AP:

    My broker, Vanguard, also hasn't updated my portfolio but I'm sure will do so tomorrow. I'll be curious to see what price that 16.50/share reinvested at. KHC opened at 71 this morning and got as high as 74.29 before setting at 72.96.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 05:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    geekette:

    Congrats on finding ways to keep earning without having to take crap jobs!

    I was only 48 and I certainly could have gone back to school. I would have emerged just as the country was getting back on its feet and possibly would have found good work in a completely different industry. My wife went back to school at age 40 and emerged two years later with a nursing degree and many hospitals competing for her services.

    But I was stubborn and tried for a year to find a good job in my industry. It didn't happen. And then I guess I was too lazy to go back to school as I neared my 50th birthday. So I a certainly take some of the "blame." Fortunately, I am quite happy at how things have turned out. No stress at all, a pretty fun life and no real financial worries.

    <<Every Friday, good people shown the door for no other reason than too many people to support the low level of business we had.>>

    This continues to happen in journalism and other fields. The grating thing in my particular case was that within months after me and dozens of others were shown the door, supposedly because the company was broke, upper management gave themselves huge raises -- tens and tens of thousands each. It created a lot of bitterness, especially for those who were suffering greatly. I know that's how capitalism works sometimes, but to me it is immoral, corrupt and just plain lousy!

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 04:51 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    geekette:

    In Jan 2009, I was "retired" by my company when I was 48. The "retirement" came a few weeks after I was told during my annual review how valuable I was and that the money definitely was there to fund my position for all of 2009. I was the classic example of a multiple-award-winning employee who was "kicked to the curb while still adding value." Oh, and I didn't receive a penny of severance when I was "put out to pasture," either.

    So it happens -- and it actually happens quite a bit in struggling industries. I worked in the newspaper business and it is still happening.

    Yes, I could have gotten another full-time job in my industry. I was offered several, most at about 30-40% of what I had been making. Thankfully, I didn't desperately need a job, so I chose to go a different direction; I do freelance writing, coaching and officiating, and I earn about 15% of my former salary.

    Again, I could afford to do so because my wife works full-time with health benefits, our kids are grown and independent, our house is paid for, we have zero debt, etc. But my heart bleeds for those in my position who couldn't afford to be retired well before they turned 60 (let alone 65). They had to take crap jobs at crap wages just to get by.

    If you think this hasn't happened over and over and over again in a multitude of industries, you aren't paying attention.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 02:53 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    Ron:

    <<Well, one can continue investing after retiring.>>

    Absolutely, and I should have mentioned that in my comments. I fully expect to at least keep dripping the divvies into many companies I own because I will not need to spend every penny of dividend income during retirement. And if we have some leftover dollars, those will go into new investments or top-offs of old ones.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 02:29 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    Contraria:

    I have made that exact point many times, both in my articles and in comments.

    For my wife and I, investing is BY FAR our biggest "expense," as we max out all 401ks and Roths. That's tens of thousands of dollars we currently "spend," and, as you correctly point out, "That expense evaporates on retirement day."

    Many -- perhaps most -- folks fail to realize that fact when talking about this kind of stuff.

    We have gotten used to living on much less than we take in. Barring some catastrophic world event, we will have absolutely no problem living on our dividends, SS and pensions -- and neither of us has ever come close to earning a six-figure salary.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 01:15 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Are Dividend Growth Investors Livin' Too Large? [View article]
    Robert:

    I have stopped dealing with a couple of others, and it's quite freeing.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 10:36 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    Robert:

    Doggone it ... Seeking Alpha only lets me like your comment once!

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 10:02 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    Bill:

    I have been to SD numerous times and I've enjoyed every visit, so I can see why it is your "mistress." I know it is an expensive place, though I didn't know that about electricity there. Do you invest in the ute that supplies the elec?

    Being debt-free will help any retiree -- or prospective retiree, or young person, or middle-aged person or ANY person! Congrats, and good fortune to you.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 10:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can You Retire Worry-Free On Less Than $1 Million? [View article]
    This is a much-discussed topic and it is impossible to come up with a one-size-fits-all answer.

    Most of those who live in Omaha -- including the city's most famous resident -- probably could retire quite nicely with a million-dollar nest egg. Most of those who live in New York or San Francisco might struggle to do so.

    I live in Charlotte, which is in between those two extremes but is closer to Omaha than to San Francisco. I am quite certain my wife and I could enjoy a financially independent, stress-free retirement on $1 million -- or even quite a bit less.

    Another factor that isn't discussed here at all is lifestyle, both before retirement and in retirement. Lifestyle not only varies greatly from person to person, but it also is adjustable. One doesn't "need" expensive vacations, theatre tickets or BMWs; one chooses to afford these and other extravagances.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 09:36 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Measuring The Success Of Your Dividend Portfolio [View article]
    I don't expect my DG portfolio's income alone to match my expenses. I expect that income to combine with SS and pension payments to let me enjoy a financially sounds, stress-free retirement.

    Having said that, given the dividend-stream-building pace we are on and the relatively low-key way my wife and I live, our portfolio's income very well might pay all of our retirement expenses. That would leave the rest for lots of fun as well as for a financial legacy for our family.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 09:26 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should I Shut Up And Buy Realty Income? [View article]
    Hi Adam. Nice thought-provoking piece with good data.

    As you know, I'm not big on making stock recommendations. So here's how I would answer the question you pose in your final paragraph:

    Do exactly what you did in 2013: Give yourself (and maybe your readers in another article?) yield and buy points. Only this time, take your own advice if O gets to those points.

    As for a couple other things you raise:

    1. Although I consider O a core holding, I don't "love" the company. I appreciate it for what it is an how it fits into my portfolio.

    2. As a few other commenters have pointed out, yes, there is no guarantee O will continue raising its dividend. There also is no guarantee I will make it across the street without being hit by a bus. There are no guarantees in life. But O calls itself The Monthly Dividend Company, and its stewards will do everything in their power to keep making O an attractive investment for all those who seek to own companies with consistent, rising dividends. It's not a sure thing, but it's fairly close to that.

    Mike
    Jul 6, 2015. 09:10 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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