Seeking Alpha
View as an RSS Feed

Moon Kil Woong  

View Moon Kil Woong's Comments BY TICKER:
AA, AAON, AAPL, ABAT, ABIO, ABT, ABX, ACF, ACN, ADBE, ADP, ADRU, ADT, AEGR, AFL, AGG, AGNC, AGOL, AGQ, AIG, AIQUF, AIQUY, AKAM, ALLRF, ALTR, AMAT, AMBC, AMD, AMGN, AMKR, AMSC, AMTD, AMZN, ANF, ANFI, ANGI, ANTM, AONEQ, APU, ARCO, ARGT, ARNA, ARTH, ASASF, ASML, ASTM, ATHN, ATK, ATML, ATSG, ATVI, ATW, AUMN, AUY, AVEO, AVL, AVNW, AVP, AWAY, AXPW, AXTI, BA, BAB, BABA, BAC, BARL, BATS, BAX, BBBB, BBOX, BBRY, BBY, BCRX, BCS, BH, BHP, BIDU, BK, BKUNA, BLK, BLND, BMY, BND, BODY, BP, BRCD, BRCM, BRK.A, BRK.B, BX, C, CAB, CAF, CAG, CALM, CANN, CAR, CAT, CDE, CDNS, CELG, CEMP, CEO, CEPH, CF, CFC, CHC, CHGG, CHK, CHL, CIM, CIT, CL, CLNE, CLNT, CLX, CMCSA, CMCSK, CMG, CMI, CNB, CNDO, CNQR, COH, COHR, COIN, CONN, COP, COPX, CORN, CORS, COST, CPB, CPRT, CQB, CRAY, CRDS, CRM, CROX, CRUS, CRZO, CSCO, CSIQ, CTAS, CTIX, CTL, CTXS, CVLT, CVM, CVX, CWCO, CXW, CYB, CYCC, CYNK, DAKT, DANG, DB, DBA, DBC, DBLE, DD, DE, DECK, DELL, DENN, DENT, DF, DG, DGL, DGP, DGZ, DHR, DHX, DIA, DIS, DKS, DLTR, DMND, DNDN, DNKN, DRYS, DSS, DTLK, DVN, DWA, DXD, DXJ, DXLG, DZZ, E, EA, EADSY, EAT, EBAY, EBIX, EDAC, EFA, EGB, EGF, EGHT, EGOV, EIGI, EMIS, EOG, EPZM, EQIX, ERO, ETFC, EUFN, EWG, EWJ, EWP, EWQ, EWS, EWT, EWU, EWW, EWY, EXAR, EXC, EXK, EXL, EZCH, EZPW, F, FB, FBIZ, FBP, FCAU, FCEL, FCX, FDN, FDO, FDX, FFIV, FFNT, FMCC, FNMA, FPI, FPX, FRFHF, FSLR, FULL, FXB, FXE, FXI, FXY, GA, GAGA, GALE, GASS, GCF, GDX, GE, GEOS, GERN, GES, GEX, GG, GLD, GLL, GLMFF, GLRE, GLW, GM, GMCR, GME, GMED, GMO, GNC, GNRC, GNTX, GOOG, GOOGL, GPL, GPS, GRMN, GRPN, GS, GSFVF, GSK, GTATQ, GUYFF, GZPFY, HAIN, HAL, HBM, HD, HIG, HIMX, HLF, HNHPF, HOGS, HOLX, HPQ, HRB, HRBN, HSBC, HTA, HUM, HYFXY, HYGS, IAU, IBIO, IBM, ICE, IEF, IHF, IMUC, INCY, INFU, INFY, INTC, INTX, IOC, IR, IRDM, IRL, ISRG, ITB, ITLT, ITLY, ITYBY, IVV, IWM, IYF, IYH, IYJ, IYK, IYR, IYT, IYW, IYZ, JBHT, JBL, JCP, JJC, JKS, JMBA, JNJ, JNK, JNPR, JPM, JWN, K, KB, KBE, KBH, KCG, KERX, KIE, KIRK, KKD, KLAC, KLIC, KME, KMP, KNPRF, KO, KODK, KORS, LAYN, LDHL, LECO, LEH, LEHMQ, LEHNQ, LGF, LGZ, LINE, LIWA, LL, LMNX, LMT, LNG, LNKD, LNVGY, LOCK, LOGI, LOW, LPDX, LQD, LULU, LVLT, MA, MAS, MCD, MCF, MCO, MCP, MDT, MEOH, MFGLQ, MIL, MKL, MKSI, MMM, MNK, MNKD, MNST, MOGLF, MON, MORL, MOS, MOV, MRO, MRVL, MS, MSFT, MSLP, MT, MTGE, MTL, MU, MUB, MUSA, MZG, NAMG, NBG, NBR, NBS, NEM, NEON, NEPT, NEWN, NFLX, NKE, NLR, NLY, NOK, NRP, NSPH, NTOIF, NUAN, NUE, NUS, NUVA, NVAX, NVDA, NXPI, NYT, NYX, OAS, OGZPY, OIH, OIL, OLN, ONNN, ONTY, OPTT, ORAN, ORCL, ORLY, OSK, OUBS, OVTI, P, PAAS, PALM, PAY, PAYX, PBI, PBPB, PEIX, PEP, PFE, PG, PHMD, PHYS, PIP, PKB, PKT, PLCM, PLUG, PLX, PM, PNRA, POAHF, POT, PPLT, PRKR, PRLB, PRXI, PSLV, PSQ, PUDA, QCOM, QLGC, QQQ, QUAL, RAD, RAIL, RAX, RBS, REE, REGI, REGN, REMX, RENN, REZ, RGR, RHHBY, RIO, RIOM, RL, RMBS, RNF, RPTP, RSH, RST, RSX, RT, RTH, RTN, RWO, S, SAND, SAP, SAY, SBMRY, SBUX, SCHW, SCRT, SCTY, SDRL, SDS, SE, SEA, SEAC, SGI, SGLRF, SGOL, SGSVF, SH, SHLD, SHLO, SIEGY, SINA, SJM, SJW, SKUL, SKX, SKYY, SLM, SLV, SLW, SMA, SMH, SNDK, SNE, SOCL, SODA, SPA, SPDL, SPF, SPLK, SPLS, SPPI, SPXS, SPXU, SPY, SQNM, SSNLF, SSTK, SSYS, STLEF, STMP, STP, STX, STXS, SU, SUNE, SUSQ, SVVC, SWC, SWHC, SWK, SWY, SYK, SYMC, SYX, SYY, SZYM, T, TAOIF, TAP, TBF, TBT, TDC, TEVA, TGT, TIF, TIP, TJX, TLB, TLO, TLT, TM, TNH, TOL, TOT, TOYS, TPCS, TREE, TRLG, TRW, TSCDF, TSCO, TSLA, TSM, TSRA, TST, TUMI, TWC, TWTR, TWX, TXN, TZA, UAE, UAN, UBG, UDN, UDOW, UEC, UGA, UGL, UNF, UNG, UNH, UNIS, UNXL, UPS, URA, USG, USO, UTX, UUP, UVV, UVXY, V, VALE, VARI, VCVOF, VHC, VIA, VICL, VIFL, VLO, VMW, VNM, VRNG, VRTX, VSH, VSR, VVUS, VXX, VZ, WATT, WBSN, WDC, WFC, WFM, WHR, WIT, WM, WMB, WMT, WPRT, WPSHF, WWWW, WZGRF, X, XHB, XIDEQ, XIN, XLF, XLI, XLK, XLNX, XLP, XOM, XPO, XRT, XRX, YGE, YHOO, YNDX, YOKU, YUM, Z, ZIOP, ZLTQ, ZNGA, ZQK, ZROZ, ZSTN
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Rhetoric and Reality in Ecuador's Default [View article]
    You are right that this often gets tied up with moralization. The interesting thing to note is that businesses refuse to pay debt for many reasons. The biggest reasons is that those they owe debt to have little or no ability to collect. If you are a business in financial trouble you will notice quickly that no one wants to pay you in hopes you go bankrupt and they can settle the debt at pennies on the dollar.

    This is not only legal but a normal business practice. Likewise, businesses declare bankruptcy protection if it serves them even though they almost always have the ability to keep paying for at least a few more months. It just doesn't serve them right to keep paying when there is no long term viability to do so.

    To think that the state would not have the legal ability or the wisdom to do what any small business can and does do in economic crisis is quite silly. Think twice before you decide high interest rate foreign bonds on states with massive debt to GDP are a good buy.

    As for the US, the only reason the US keeps paying is because their rates are low and they want to keep borrowing more and more. If the US finds itself paying very high rates on funds it can't afford and no one will finance their interest in even more borrowing, even the US will not be immune to realizing that it is better off walking away from those it owes.
    Jan 4, 2010. 01:15 PM | 12 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mortgage Modification Failure [View article]
    There are 3 issues here.

    1) Geithner and Bernanke say that stronger regulation is needed but continue to support programs that water down the threshold for obtaining a loan, exempt Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from any sense of reality, or force taxpayers to shoulder banks losses while allowing them accounting tricks to hide their losses year after year as they erode even further. Talk about real regulation is a joke. They don't want it. In fact they are preventing it. The Federal Reserve's buying Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages and backstopping them for unlimited losses is a great example of the hide your head in the sand type mentality they really hold.

    2) Asking people to stay and keep paying mortgages on ARM loans when they are underwater drains the pathetically little assets and income they usually have and makes it impossible for them to ever get their finances in order. To advise them to continue to do so only serves the banks interest who don't want to admit their loans are bad. Yet that is what they are advising millions of homeowners to do in hopes for a government sponsored bailout of some sort. How many years do they have to remain in limbo before they realize this is just a mortgage financer's game in which the government is complicit in?

    3) The $700 billion TARP, plus the Federal Reserve's $2 trillion (estimated, it could be more but since the Fed isn't audited who knows) mortgage backstop schemes, plus the $100 billion Federal Reserve Mae and Mac mortgage buyouts, is a ridiculous sum to throw at this problem. They could have used it to reduce the mortgages of every American in default or cut everyone's taxes by 1/3 for a year. Anyone who couldn't recover after such a windfall probably wouldn't. Rather instead we have thrown it all away and spent it in such a way that we are encouraging banks to not lend rather than lend only exacerbating the problem.

    There is plenty to blame for this mess but most of it goes back to Washington and the Federal Reserve. Thankthe government again for making this situation, wasting our money, prolonging this recession, and now making it worse by decieving millions of Americans in a bad situation to get in a worse one by paying mortgages on bad loans whith no equity. They are making the bankers rich at the cost of the poorest people in America. Not like they care.
    Jan 4, 2010. 01:01 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Manufacturing Data Bodes Well for 2010 [View article]
    The manufacturing industry that is surviving is growing off the carcasses of those that have died or are dying. I don't see any new flowering in this sector. Aty least those that live through the downturn will do well in whatever economy that follows.

    As for low inventories, I don't see that changing much. Businesses have become much more efficient at keeping inventory down or making sure that they can force manufactures to hold inventory until they want, need, or already sold the goods. It then becomes just another added burden on an industry that is already under a lot of economic pressure.
    Jan 4, 2010. 12:40 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Where Is Potash Headed in 2010? [View article]
    I think the potash bubble was popped a long time ago and don't see any return to a lack of supply for a long time. Like all mining, once a bubble forms the amount of new production that turns on takes years to work its way through the system.

    Likewise, the turn all your ariable land into over-fertilized ethanol corn plantations have also dissapeared. That is fortunate because we still need land on which to grow food to eat.

    The "don't believe the analysts" comment is very appropos regarding POT. Like always, they were bullish at the top.
    Jan 4, 2010. 12:29 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Copper: The New Precious Metal? [View article]
    Davewmart you hit it on the head regarding rare earth metals. The environmental impact and devastation in mining these rare elements is the biggest issue to America and everywhere that actually cares about their land. Let them keep turning their land into a lunar landscape and making their rivers run with heavy metal deposits if they so choose. America has an abundance of these metals too, they just aren't willing to dump a ton of tailings down a mountain river in order to get an ounce of REEs.

    REEs are not like oil and gold. They are not concentrated in only a few places on earth. They can be obtained troughout the world if you are willing to pay the price.

    As for copper which is the issue of this article. China is betting heavily on eirth an economic recovery or the hopes the US will make a pure copper penny again.
    Jan 4, 2010. 12:02 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Conspiracy Theories: Great for Entertainment, Not a Source of Investment Advice [View article]
    Providing endless supplies of free money to favored banks and financial institutions (note that I don't say worthy) is not a conspiracy since it is obvious. The results are also obvious. The smooth trajectory of stocks and commodities are mirrored by the smooth decline in the dollar's value.

    There is no mystery at all here...
    Jan 3, 2010. 07:52 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Beware the Subtleties of Central Bank 'Speak' [View article]
    Central banks tend to all do the same thing, deny what they know they are going to have to do until the last moment. Then implement what they were going to do and say they had no clue that they were going to do it but the market events forced their hand.

    Don't be fooled, such delaying tactics make someone in the know tons and cost those that get fooled into thinking they are being honest.

    Good article...
    Jan 3, 2010. 07:48 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Economic Double-Dip? Try a Triple [View article]
    No other country taxes as much and provides so little. That is why employers end up bearing the brunt and then naturally come to the conclusion that labor in America is too expensive. If the government wishes to keep taxing us at this level it should figure out how to cut every other expense and provide Americans with some level of health care and infrastructure services rather than dumping it all on employers and the States.

    As far as I can tell, the Federal government provides virtually nothing to the citizens besides highway subsidies, a military that has outpriced itself so badly it can't even afford to pay for its troops to stay in action overseas and provide them a decent level of equipment and medical services, and a few very poorly managed wealth redistribution schemes that don't even pay for themselves. We don't need more government spending. We need government spending that actually provides something to us.

    Overlay growth in government with this graph and you can clearly see the correlation between government spending and economic decline. It is the cause not the effect.
    Jan 3, 2010. 07:40 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 2010 Market Could Be Greatest Bull of Modern Age [View article]
    "the knowledge gained in the '00s could prove especially beneficial over the next decades", Why am I even bothering to read this? If the way we handled this downturn is mirrored 100 fold down the ages we might as well prepare to barter because our money will be worthless and our economy will never advance.
    Jan 2, 2010. 11:10 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • After TARP: Part 1 [View article]
    It's great that people are finally waking up to the fact government taxpayer sponsored programs are encouraging banks not to lend and loaning cheap money to banks to invest in higher rate loans to the government. Or anotherwards, the government is borrowing to loan to banks so they can loan to government backed entities at higher rates so the banks can book a profit and the public gets shafted at both ends. Absolutely ridiculous...
    Jan 2, 2010. 11:06 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Lumber Prices Forecast Housing Stability [View article]
    The higher prices over the year may be reflected of the minor rebound in the US already, nothing more. Does anyone have statistics showing lumber prices bweing a leading indicator as the author is inferring? Personally I would doubt it. Housing starts might be more forward looking then materials going into homebuilding. And even then, a lot of starts get scrapped these days, thus that statistic is more and more a sentiment indicator than a reflection of reality.
    Jan 2, 2010. 03:07 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • U.S. Debt Scheme: Is It All Just a Ponzi Scheme? [View article]
    The Bloomber article is closer to what is going on. What the federal government is eating in commitments ansd shouldering on taxpayers without your notice makes American's renewed commitment to savings absolutely worthless. Worse yet, it is going to the worst businesses and most immoral in society.
    Jan 2, 2010. 01:33 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Extended Unemployment and the True Jobless Figure [View article]
    Everyone in America loses in this downturn save the TBTF banks AIG, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and all those who's capital base or percentage of marketshare actually grew on taxpayer money and government support. Rather than moving this to class warfare we shhould all agree and work together to stop those companies and their lobbyists from using elected officials and ther Federal Reserve from bilking us and depriciating our currency to the point there is more currency than water.
    Jan 2, 2010. 01:28 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 2010 Economic Trends: Paths of Least Resistance [View article]
    Sorry to hear about Steve passing away.

    Oil consumption, asides from JP Morgan and others trying to gamble on it as a commodity by keeping tankers from porting, will be driven by the Chinese and emerging world economies. Fortunately, oil demand is not rising significantly in the US. Also fortunately, Americans are still saving and working off their debt even though the powers that be would rather have Americans living paycheck to paycheck with no assets or savings to speak of.

    I hope many people vowed to work off their credit card debt this New Years Eve.
    Jan 2, 2010. 11:40 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 2010: Time to Arrest the Oil Extortionists? [View article]
    Given that banks don't wish to lend to the public it makes great sense that they decide to speculate on oil. This is but just one commodity. They are speculating on many and good old Goldman, MS, etc. are speculating on stocks and tradable equities as well.

    This leads to commodity and equities bubbles as we all know. But the real culprit for the bubble action is the Federal Reserve who is pumping free money into banks to let them hoard as many assets as they can without any requirement for them to lend it to the public. The Federal Reserve is 100% responsible for commodity's hoarding and the new asset bubbles just as they were responsible for the housing bubble.

    Of course they will never admit it until after the fact. And even then, their solution will always be the same: blow another one. When will the US stop this travesty?
    Jan 1, 2010. 01:20 PM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
11,564 Comments
36,746 Likes