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  • RLJ Lodging Distancing Itself From The Competition: Watch For Strong Dividend Hikes [View article]
    Better to be lucky than good.
    Mar 16, 2015. 09:23 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • For Some Baby Boomers, Retirement Might Mean A Part-Time Job [View article]
    Agreed. I know someone right now having a tough time finding work even though they end up being a pretty cheap employee when you consider the employer doesn't even have to pay healthcare costs. (already covered by medicare). But I see it in my office building, at McDonalds, etc. It used to be that MCD had a bunch of 16-20 year olds working there. But now, its 60 year olds.
    Feb 21, 2015. 11:42 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • For Some Baby Boomers, Retirement Might Mean A Part-Time Job [View article]
    Mike, its great that you can sock away for retirement and that you do so. Not all retirees were had such great foresight.
    Feb 21, 2015. 11:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • For Some Baby Boomers, Retirement Might Mean A Part-Time Job [View article]
    I hate annuities too, but the research and the findings were sound. I'm sorry it had to be MetLife that produced it.
    Feb 21, 2015. 11:08 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • For Some Baby Boomers, Retirement Might Mean A Part-Time Job [View article]
    Hi Gary, you might laugh because you are not one of the baby boomers that is struggling to make ends meet. For whatever reason...no savings...no planning...traumatic financial event...many people NEED a part-time job to retire comfortably. Congratulations on your retirement, but please don't laugh at the stories that unfortunately, some people are living. Thanks for reading and enjoy retirement.
    Feb 21, 2015. 11:06 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • For Some Baby Boomers, Retirement Might Mean A Part-Time Job [View article]
    That may be true varan. People will take second jobs to have a sense of meaning, but apparently we don't know the same baby-boomers, because most, if not all of the ones I know, need close to or more than 100% of their retirement income AND they have taken second jobs because they NEED the money. And there will continue to be the same challenges in the future for many retirees. Some just don't plan that far ahead...some can't plan that far ahead. I, for one, am not trying to get someone to turn over their hard earned IRA to some third party. I'm talking about the people who DON"T have IRAs. Those are the ones I worry about. Thanks for reading.
    Feb 21, 2015. 11:02 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • For Some Baby Boomers, Retirement Might Mean A Part-Time Job [View article]
    Buyandhold, I completely agree. My grandparents struggled in their later years for the reasons you describe. I hope future generations learn from that. Thanks for reading.
    Feb 20, 2015. 06:35 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Sleep Well At Night REIT For All Seasons [View article]
    Hi renanulrich, I see no reason why you can't invest in REITs as a foreigner, just like you can invest in US Equities. However, your dividends will be withheld at 30% or so depending on where you reside. For broad REIT exposure, you can look at the Neuberger Berman US Real Estate Securities Fund. NO taxes withheld. Remind me next week and I will get you the ISIN number.
    Feb 19, 2015. 10:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Healthcare REITs May Continue At The Rhythm Of The M&A Beat [View article]
    thanks Dog
    Feb 19, 2015. 08:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Funds Cut By New Congressional Budget: Generation Y Take Note [View article]
    http://nyl.co/1vTLRYA

    http://1.usa.gov/10CdXCY

    http://bit.ly/1vTLPzV

    http://cnnmon.ie/1vTLPzX

    http://nyti.ms/1vTLSf9
    Feb 17, 2015. 05:15 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired And Looking For Income From Your Bond Allocation? Pump Up Your Yield With A Barbell Approach [View article]
    a bond ladder works better the steeper the yield curve is. As the yield curve flattens, you should move towards shorter duration bonds. The suggestion of this article's barbell approach is to protect from interest rate risk by having a greater percentage in short-term (than the laddered approach), while keeping some positions long-term to generate a higher yield. While the bond ladder will work in most circumstances, there isn't a lot of value in the 'belly' of the curve right now. Better to target a duration of 5-10 with a barbell approach than with a direct exposure to the 5-10 year part of the curve. Just look at the difference between the 5 and 10 year rate. Not much, so why invest there. Split the bond ladder into both shorter and longer maturities and you will end up with a more optimal portfolio. IMHO
    Feb 12, 2015. 09:27 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Protect Your Nest Egg: Use Low Volatility Strategies In Your Retirement Portfolio [View article]
    Great returns Hardog. Congrats. Not sure what your previous advisors were doing but the early 1970's were not good for equity markets so not to defend them, just adding additional context. I do know that many 'advisor' churn portfolios and its sad that so many retail clients are victims of that. Unfortunately, many of those same clients don't like paying a fixed advisory fee based on AUM because the SEE the fee. They don't see the commissions being charged on brokerage accounts. In any case, you did a great job of investing through the years. All I'm saying is that be cautious with having too large an allocation to equities if you're drawing from your retirement account. It could be hard to recover from another 2008 scenario if you're also withdrawing funds.
    Feb 11, 2015. 11:48 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Protect Your Nest Egg: Use Low Volatility Strategies In Your Retirement Portfolio [View article]
    Hi Zach, thanks for reading. I know that LGLV has less than a year of track record so it will be interesting to see how it does. I understand that the weightings for each of the securities is based on a 'factor' or set of factors that together may lead to a low vol portfolio. What I like about SPLV is that you and I can easily replicate the portfolio because of its simplicity. It invests in 100 stocks in inverse proportion to the volatility of each such that a stock with a volatility of 3% will have twice the weight as a stock with a volatility of 6%. I'm simplifying of course, but the formula is available on some of the funds documentation.
    Feb 9, 2015. 09:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Protect Your Nest Egg: Use Low Volatility Strategies In Your Retirement Portfolio [View article]
    greenspan, congratulations, that's great news that your portfolio has done so well, but there is no reason why you can't continue to invest through an IRA or a regular investment account. My point in the article, however, was specific to those nearing retirement and how much they should have in equities. For you, or anyone else with a long time horizon, 2008 was a great buying opportunity. But for someone in retirement, 2008 was a not a good time to be withdrawing funds (as a retiree would have been doing. Thanks for reading and commenting.
    Feb 9, 2015. 09:31 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Caterpillar's Pullback May Be A Good Opportunity For Retirees To Add Exposure To This Bellwether Stock [View article]
    Villi, I agree, we don't see that type of analysis and its too bad. You may be right comparing the next 5 years compared to the last 5 years, but the upside surprise may come from infrastructure spending, keystone pipeline (if it happens), a recovery in EM that could be a year or two out. There are certainly catalysts that COULD drive the stock higher but even if it merely remains steady, it's a Dow 30 stock and it should be a fine hold in any retirement portfolio. Thanks for the dialog.
    Feb 4, 2015. 08:45 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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