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Rob Ward

 
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  • Boeing Is A Buy After Recent Dividend And Buyback Increases [View article]
    this is generally true for industrial stocks as a whole.
    Dec 18, 2014. 07:45 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Few Financial Concerns About Philip Morris International [View article]
    i always pay cash. initially getting an account from a vendor usually involves at least some financial documents. the amount and detail of the financials all depends on how much you are buying from the vendor. the same goes for a mortgage. as you can probably tell, i am not a fan of debt. i have no mortgage and pay cash to vendors. the cash price is always cheaper than credit/borrowing price (a factor seldom factored in).
    Dec 15, 2014. 04:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Few Financial Concerns About Philip Morris International [View article]
    using the limited resources i have for the model you suggest i come up with the following from 2010-present: total dividends paid 26.582B. debt stands at 28.84B currently, up from 17.45B in 2010. that is why i say they have borrowed to pay a portion of the dividend. in about 5 years the debt can be gone without a dividend. is that good or bad, i do not know the answer on that one. share count went from 1.814B in 2010 down to 1.554B in 2014. i do not know how many shares management wants to buy, but to go under 1 billion shares will be a lot of debt.

    i do not have a good answer on why i look at book value. i guess it is the small business person in me coming out. i understand book value means more to my little business than it does PM. PM has value not included in book value as well (brand loyalty, etc.). to me, book value is a measure of risk. for example, in real estate 100% of foreclosures are on houses with a mortgage (debt).

    I have enjoyed the discussion Matthew
    Dec 13, 2014. 01:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Few Financial Concerns About Philip Morris International [View article]
    my point was that dividends are not free. the money does not grow on a tree and you just pick it off. do you agree that when PM pays $4 in dividends this year the company is worth $4 less than it would be had it not paid the dividend? not trying to get into a dividends are dumb debate, i really do like dividends btw.
    Dec 13, 2014. 01:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Few Financial Concerns About Philip Morris International [View article]
    if i am correct PM is borrowing money at say 3%, to avoid paying a 4.6% dividend. my whole point is why pay the dividend in the first place? it would make more sense to me to buy back the stock with "dividend money" and use less borrowing if management wants to reduce share count. wouldn't this save about $6 billion a year in debt/dividend payments given the current share count?
    Dec 12, 2014. 04:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Few Financial Concerns About Philip Morris International [View article]
    i do not know how you can say they are not borrowing to pay a dividend. PM buys back stock and pays a dividend, and they are borrowing to do it, hence the ever decreasing book value.

    paying interest on debt or paying out dividends is money that is gone forever. why not keep the dividend and either buy back more stock if it is so smart or just have less debt? to me, dividends are for surplus money of which PM has none.
    Dec 12, 2014. 01:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • A Few Financial Concerns About Philip Morris International [View article]
    wouldn't stopping the dividend make PM's financials a whole lot better? borrowing money to pay shareholders dividends does not make sense to me.
    Dec 12, 2014. 10:30 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Reflections On Coca-Cola: Lessons Learned From The Seeking Alpha Dividend Community [View article]
    I agree with the plan. I crossed the same road with MCD and got out at 100. Not the top, but a lot better than where it is now.
    Dec 10, 2014. 09:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Going Off CCC List To Find Total Return For Dividend Growth Investors. [View article]
    Great article with a lot of meat to it. I never realized just how different VDIGX and VIG (the etf version) are. VIG has almost no international exposure and 3 times the number of holdings of VDIGX. I have found it hard to beat a combination of VTI and VEU over the long run, even though I hate to admit it.
    Dec 4, 2014. 08:07 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Another Reason To Own The Gabelli Global Gold CEF [View article]
    The Gabelli CEFs use mostly return of capital for the dividend payments, your just getting a portion of your initial investment back at the expense of an ever shrinking NAV.

    Would you rather have 5 shares worth $20 each or 10 shares worth $10 each. More shares does not mean more value all the time.
    Nov 17, 2014. 09:07 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Does Share Price Recover After Dividends Paid Out On The Ex-Date? Part 2: A Case Study With Exxon Mobil [View article]
    Money does not grow on trees. Once paid, the money is gone.

    Companies pay dividends because they have nothing better to do with the money. This is why mainly they are established "cash cow" stocks.
    Aug 2, 2014. 06:50 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Chase Yield In Retirement, Part II: Take Dividend Growth Profits Now [View article]
    I was confused when you said you have $1 million in retirement, but have a car payment?
    Jul 15, 2014. 04:02 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investing: Creating Your Own Dividend By Selling Shares (Part 1) [View article]
    First, I am still in the accumulation phase (20 more years) so I do not sell currently. I add the most to the worst asset class each year when I re-balance. I also do not own any individual stocks. I own VTI, VEU, and individual bonds. Every year I re-balance to 60% VTI, 10% VEU, and 30% individual bonds. I am content with this diversified mix, so I will hang onto the worst asset class each year. It may be the best one next year, who knows.

    My logic is one should re-balance the portfolio in the withdraw phase as well. That means you sell a portion of your best performers to get everything back in balance. We are talking about 4% so you are not selling that much in any one year.


    May 21, 2014. 08:09 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investing: Creating Your Own Dividend By Selling Shares (Part 1) [View article]
    If your going to sell 4% each year it should be from your best performing asset class that year. So, when stocks get hammered your selling from your bond allocation most likely. Sell high and buy low is the idea. When stocks soar, sell your 4% from stocks and let the bonds ride.

    I believe dividends are just like selling stock because the company is worth less by the amount they withdraw to pay the dividend. I realize most in this part of SA do not agree. And that is OK, there are many ways to get to the finish line.
    May 19, 2014. 10:29 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Vanguard ETFs Can Become Number 1 [View article]
    i believe they track a different yet very similar index of foreign stocks
    May 13, 2014. 04:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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145 Comments
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