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Robert Allan Schwartz  

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Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Maximizing Our Social Security Benefits: A Cautionary Tale For DGI Portfolios [View article]
    Giorgio, I'm sure you're right, I'm not there yet, so I don't know.
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "Of course as DGI suggest it's easy with a large starting point."

    Actually, we say the opposite. You can start with a small amount of money at age 25, invest in dividend GROWTH stocks, reinvest the dividends, and enjoy the benefits of compounding for 40 years until you retire at 65.

    "For those of us building forward you cannot discount the strategy of growth stocks to be transferred later into dividend stocks."

    I don't "discount" anything. But I wonder how easy it would be for someone who has never had any experience or practice choosing dividend growth companies, to suddenly, on their 65th birthday, sell their entire portfolio of total return companies and switch to dividend growth companies, at whatever prices Mr. Market is offering that day.
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:36 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "except that underwritten by bank of geekette for the sole benefit of geekette."

    I'm self-employed, so I am in the same situation.
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Maximizing Our Social Security Benefits: A Cautionary Tale For DGI Portfolios [View article]
    "Maybe there would be less grumbling if SS gave out free drinks?"

    The government gives out free drugs:

    http://tinyurl.com/pcn...
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:13 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    SA doesn't seem to offer a way to find out the previous monikers of a new moniker, so we have to guess who a new moniker used to be known as.

    :-(
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:10 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "But in and of itself, an ounce of gold has no intrinsic value."

    I agree, but that's because I do not believe in the concept of "intrinsic value". A thing has "value" only because someone else is willing to exchange something for it.
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "And PBGC is in place in case of employer bankruptcy or other issues in fulfilling pension obligations. Multi-employer plans are deeply troubled these days and PBGC is very concerned."

    PBGC is almost out of money itself:

    http://tinyurl.com/o4t...
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "Everybody who paid $1 in will get at least $1 out."

    Ted, that can't be true.
    The first recipient contributed nothing, but received something.
    It's already been pointed out that SS will reduce to 70% benefits in only a few more years.
    Those who paid $1 in will get 70 cents out.
    Jul 30, 2015. 07:06 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "One might believe that, but how would he explain the spot price changes for gold, every day, changing the value of that ounce?
    Ignore the spot price changes?
    An ounce can be "worth" a thousand dollars today and eight hundred dollars tomorrow."

    Ted is correct - an ounce of gold is always exactly an ounce of gold.
    But a dollar is not always exactly a dollar.
    Sometimes a dollar is "worth" more. Sometimes less.
    Remember when gold was "officially" priced at $35/ounce?
    Dollars have lost a huge amount of value since then.
    Jul 30, 2015. 05:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "It's on the SS website, so I'd say it's as reliable as any other statement coming from the government...."

    <cough, cough, splutter, gasp>

    ROTFLMAO!
    Jul 30, 2015. 05:10 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "Hopefully the decision process will be sound and fair to all involved."

    Ted, it can't be "sound and fair to all involved".
    As long as those who pay $1 in, don't get $1 out, it's not "fair" to them.
    Jul 30, 2015. 05:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • You're Missing The REIT Point: Investor Sentiment Is On Our Side [View article]
    "it's been recognized since about a century ago that the market values a dividend payer higher than a non-dividend payer all things being equal. No economic reason for this"

    The dividends in my pocket are my personal "economic reason for this".
    Jul 30, 2015. 05:07 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Market Timing Is Not Appropriate For Retired Investors [View article]
    "There's a lot of being willfully blind to risks -- like the one commenter who said that an unrealized loss is not a real loss, that as long as you don't sell you don't have a loss."

    I'm sure I'm not the only commenter who has said that, but I have said that.

    "I am astonished that in this age of Google and freely available information that someone who appears to be a serious investor claims this with a straight face. And then supports his position by playing word-games and saying that UNREALized means unREAL."

    rayvt, it's obvious that we disagree to the point where there is no benefit to be gained by further interaction.

    I will point out that I have never said anything about you personally, whereas you have said about me that I am "someone who appears to be a serious investor", and that I "play[ing] word-games".

    My high-school debate coach always said, "When they begin the ad-hominem attacks, the debate is over, and they have lost."
    Jul 30, 2015. 05:06 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "Right now, a worker paying can expect to get just 70 cents back..."

    So the trick is to stop paying in as soon as possible.
    Which means stop receiving "earned income" as soon as possible.
    Which means retire as soon as possible.
    I'm working on it, as fast as I can.

    Robert
    Jul 30, 2015. 04:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Never Run Out Of Money In Retirement [View article]
    "SS will not run out of money. After all, everyone is still paying into it."

    That's not the problem.
    The problem is that it pays out more than it takes in.
    It has done this since the day it was invented.
    SS is a Ponzi scheme.
    Jul 30, 2015. 04:52 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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