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Robert Steele

 
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  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    I respect your experience but heating pipelines with natural gas to reduce viscosity is an industry standard technique around the world. The links I cited make that clear. The effect takes ~1-2 seconds to charge a given volume of oil depending on API/viscosity. The papers on the ZERO web site have many test results that show this. The effect lasts long enough to send the oil a considerable distance downstream. This will be my last response.
    Sep 28, 2012. 12:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    The length of the section shown in the prototype was designed specifically for the flow rates used in the test. The Chairman of the Physics Department at Temple University developed a formula for determining the length and number of subsections needed for given flow rates. This formula was confirmed by the engineering team at a large pipeline equipment manufacturer and used in the design of the prototype. A given volume of oil needs to be exposed to a certain volume of electric field for a certain amount of time to charge the oil to deliver the desired effect. The amounts of time and the volumes needed to drop viscosities in a meaningful way can be accomplished in lengths that are practical to be installed on existing pipelines. As the charge dissipates, the viscosity reduction returns to normal after a period of time, but this period of time is long enough that the devices can be spaced out along the pipeline in an economically viable manner. The technology scales to faster flow rates which would require longer sections. Cathodic protection is preserved because field implementations contain "loops" or bypass pipes with valves before and after the unit that are isolated from the active electrical components of the AOT but preserve the current flowing through the pipeline for cathodic protection.
    Sep 27, 2012. 01:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    Unlike "Infitalis" who is anonymous, I have chosen to publicly describe reasons based on actual experience and expertise why ZERO technology and execution are headed in the right direction.
    Sep 26, 2012. 05:56 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    I respect your questions, but they are beyond the scope of my current information. I have been contributing my knowledge of the company between 2008 and 2011.
    Sep 26, 2012. 05:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    @debauche Yes I can because heating oil to lower viscosity is an industry standard practice. This brand new pipeline in India is heated for 600+ km with natural gas. http://bit.ly/S8G86Q. Many pipelines here in California heated for hundreds of miles with natural gas. http://bit.ly/S8GMBj

    I am an engineer. I am not a financial professional. I am long in the stock and do not follow it day to day. No one from ZERO contacted me prior to writing this article. I am a Seeking Alpha contributor. The timing of this article was based on me seeing the poorly written, disparaging and completely erroneous article that received so much attention a couple days ago on this site.

    I will add that the article in question also disparaged ZERO's history with the ZEFS technology. It was the Company's interest in magnetism's effects on improving combustion that led to ZERO meeting the Chairman of the Physics Department at Temple University who co-invented the AOT. If there had been no investment in ZEFS, there would not have been the development of AOT. As I stated, some pipeline operators know from experience that electromagnetism can be helpful in removing waxy build up because it reduces viscosity.
    Sep 26, 2012. 05:46 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    @Stocks N Sectors. I am not currently with ZERO and my analysis is from 2010 and is not based on the most current data from the company. Many popular issues that have made investors billions would have and did fail the auditor's going concern test. Many tech companies that made game changing products lost money for years prior to steadily growing through quarterly earnings. The investors who backed most tech companies took the risk that the company had to continue raising financing to get to profitability. That willingness to continue to invest in companies that auditors said were not a going concern built many of today's Fortune 500 companies and the investors that were in early did well.
    Sep 26, 2012. 02:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO Has Strong Technology And An Achieveable Business Plan [View article]
    @tworomeo. I am not currently with ZERO and my analysis is from 2010 and is not based on the most current data from the company. In 2010, I assisted in preparing an ROI analysis used by a multi-billion dollar international manufacturer that did the fabrication at their expense for the first RMOTC trials. We found that a 175 mile pipeline would have an ROI of eight months from installing the AOT technology. Specifically that the cost savings in reduced pump load and heating costs would pay for the cost of the AOT and installation in eight months. This study included in the costs the pipeline downtime, construction and installation along a 175 mile pipeline. I also did an ROI analysis for a 1,200 kilometer pipeline where the AOT would reduce the need for Drag Reducing Agent. The ROI was 8 months in that case as well. This was a thorough analysis done in coordination with an experienced pipeline equipment manufacturer. The assumed revenues to ZERO in both cases were quite substantial even with the fast ROI. The reason for this fast ROI is that the AOT does not require new technologies, fabs or materials that do not currently exist in the marketplace, and the underlying phenomenon uses 100 times less energy that heating. In the DRA cases, DRA is expensive, it takes a lot of it to have an effect and it has to be re-injected after every pump on the line.
    Sep 26, 2012. 02:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ZERO's Current Scheme Is Nearly Identical To The Program That Led To An SEC Halt And Fraud Charges In 2001 [View article]
    I'll have an article coming out in Seeking Alpha shortly. The author of this article is misinformed. I am an engineer who has worked closely with the team at Temple University and seen the technology work many times in the presence of dozens of engineers with decades of pipeline experience. The company only had access to the facilities at RMOTC after having passed the scrutiny of many highly skilled pipeline engineers from major pipeline companies and one major pipeline pump manufacturer. I was on those calls and in those meetings. STWA has real technology and a great team.
    Sep 25, 2012. 10:49 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    The major content owners are dwarfed in size and power by the ISPs and search engines. That is what laws are for, to protect minority interests from organizations of superior power. Comcast and Verizon spent more than $25 million in lobbying last year, five times the entire MPAA and RIAA lobbying budget in 2011. Google made $14 billion in PROFIT in 2011. The entire US recorded music industry made $6B in revenue in 2011. Google executives and their family members pay for "think tanks" at Harvard and Stanford to advocate for weaker copyright laws in the name of "free speech" to drive their profits and disable copyright owners use of the judicial system. Search for any major band or movie on google and routinely 80% to 90% of the first page search results are pirate pages that drive ad revenue to many of their ad networks. So far, ISPs and search engines have been able to shrewdly skirt around the laws, but the point of the article is that this behavior is now creating a "hidden" liability that there shareholders need to be aware of.
    Apr 3, 2012. 01:24 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    The "sniff test" smells just fine. US Home video sales (including streaming) have declined by 25% since the first BitTorrent search engines appeared, an annual loss of more than $7 billion a year. Did Americans suddenly stop watching movies? No. The gap is a result of tens of millions of movies now being stolen.
    Apr 3, 2012. 01:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    @danarmas every position I have taken in the article and the comments has been supported with facts and citations. If you have some facts to support the allegations you make about the motion picture industry, I look forward to reviewing them. Be that as it may, your argument is a popular one. My response to your position is that if citizens in a society that have a common belief in justice and the rule of law don't like how Ford makes cars or how the Gap makes clothes, that doesn't justify taking their products without paying for them.
    Mar 20, 2012. 12:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    I have already clearly demonstrated that your argument is factually incorrect. I will not make anymore responses to your posts. Thank you for your comments.
    Mar 20, 2012. 11:07 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    @danarmas Your claims are not accurate. ISPs outspend content industries on lobbying by a factor of more than 10x. MPAA spent $2m in lobbying in 2011. Just Comcast and Verizon spent $35m in lobbying in 2011. http://bit.ly/GASWSR http://bit.ly/GCKsHh
    Search engines, internet ad networks and ISPs who currently work together to enable and profit from media piracy make 10 times more money than the music and movie industries depending on how you size them. Annual revenues: Google $44B, Verizon $120B, WMG $2.4B. Search engines, internet ad networks make billions from selling ads to point people to pirate links without compensating content owners. Go to demonoid dot me, search for any copyrighted content to illegally download and see the ads from Fortune 500 companies including targeted ads from ISPs. US citizens have been trained by search engines that downloading content without paying for it is the "new normal" - even though it is currently illegal. Type "Adele discography" into Google and see it autopopulate the word "tpb" - the pirate bay. An ethical industry would at least post a warning that the site may violate copyright rather than auto populate guidance to assist in illegal downloading. They do that for sites that may have viruses or have expired certs. ISPs make billions distributing this content illegally. Creators have the legal right in America to decide how to distribute and copy their work. Copyrights benefit society by promoting the arts. You can claim that copyright is outdated all you want. That is an irrelevant position. Today it is the law in the US. That is why it is in the US Constitution Article 1, Section 8. Lack of copyright benefits search engines, ISPs and internet ad networks. That is why Google founders and family members invest millions in organizations that promote weaker copyright law - because it drives their business model. http://amzn.to/FRLPlO. The point of this article is that ISPs have liability for their role in profiting from mass copyright infringement.
    Mar 20, 2012. 08:18 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    The point of the article is that copyright owners have been sending notices to those abuse addresses for years and infringement continues to grow by data volume by more than 20% a year and composes 18.8% of all North American internet traffic. My premise is that It grows because ISPs are not terminating repeat infringers, this indicates to me that by deduction, they do not have safe harbor. If they had been receiving the notices of infringement and terminating subscribers who repeatedly received notices of infringement, 18.8% of North American internet traffic would not be infringing peer-to-peer traffic and the DMCA would be working.
    Mar 20, 2012. 12:20 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In U.S. Telcoms: Piracy Liability [View article]
    That is simply incorrect. Piracy does not drive sales. Here are the facts and the citations. The US Home Video Market (DVD, Blu-Ray, PayTV, VOD and Streaming) has declined 26% from $25B in 2006 to $18.5B in 2011. The first BitTorrent search engines debuted in summer of 2004.

    http://bit.ly/GzVbGW
    http://bit.ly/GAfoaC
    http://bit.ly/GzVbH0
    Mar 20, 2012. 12:03 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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