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  • Generic Competition: The $100 Billion Biologics Arena [View article]
    Jon,

    Sandoz has a nice looking biosimilar pipeline. Thanks for bringing that to our attention.
    Mar 7 11:52 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Biotech Companies With Big Pipelines [View article]
    Good point. I agree that companies with promising science/technology are unable to realize their full potential when they get bought out. Thanks for sharing.
    Feb 24 10:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Biotech Companies With Big Pipelines [View article]
    I agree, Astex does look promising.
    Feb 23 11:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Biotech Companies With Big Pipelines [View article]
    Cinryze is approved in the intraveneous form. Here, in phase 2, HALO is studying it in the subcutaneous form.
    Feb 23 11:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Theravance: A $1.5 Billion Company With An $8 Billion Product [View article]
    I hope nobody holds their breath for generic Advair. Sure, it will happen, but not for awhile. Companies are having a hard time replicating the dry powder inhaler system with Advair. Thanks for your comment.
    Feb 23 12:12 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Theravance: A $1.5 Billion Company With An $8 Billion Product [View article]
    Yes, there is a high probability for approval for the listed indications, but asthma in the U.S. is a developing story.
    Feb 22 09:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Sun May Not Rise At Horizon Pharma For Duexis [View article]
    Thanks for the reading.
    Feb 15 12:08 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Replacing Coumadin: A $10 Billion Opportunity [View article]
    Jon, thanks for another article about one of the "hot" areas in pharmacy and enjoy following your topics. I, too, believe that Apixaban will be a hit. It is an oral factor Xa inhibitor that is more effective and causes less bleeding than warfarin.

    Currently, the newer anticoags don't have any antidotes and the only treatment is stopping the drug and providing supportive care. They also cost more. Warfarin costs about 80 dollars per month with once monthly INR monitoring and Pradaxa and Xarelto cost about $240-$260 per month. However, no INR monitoring is required for the new ones. Because of this, reps are selling Pradaxa with the impression that facilities can get rid of their Coumadin clinics. Pradaxa is slightly more effective than Xarelto AND warfarin as it prevents 5 more strokes per 1000 patients per year versus warfarin. Xarelto does not demonstrate that it works better than warfarin.

    BTW, how did you come up with the $10 billion dollar figure?
    Feb 13 09:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Selling Drugs: Small Biotech Stocks With Strong Sales Growth [View article]
    Thanks for reading, but please divert your ill-informed comments elsewhere. I never stated patent expiration was an issue. I discussed the patent challenge. Additionally, if you are going to look at my profile, research my credentials first before making a statement like that. I am not a physician and you are once again, misguided.
    Feb 13 03:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Big, Robust Pipelines At Small Biotech Companies [View article]
    There are a number of companies working on insulin. What do you mean by "improved" insulin? If I am understanding you correctly, the company that comes to mind that has a large upside is Mannkind (MNKD). Tremendous upside if they are able to workout their inhaler data with the FDA, but one can also make an argument against MNKD.
    Feb 7 11:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Pharma With Big Compounds: Final Dance With The FDA [View article]
    I bring up that phentermine is a controlled substance because there is potential for abuse. Qnexa, if approved, will most likely end up being a "lifestyle" medication that is ripe for abuse and less of one for the purported health benefits. True, teratogenicity is not very common, but nobody wants to be that "one." I believe these are the same concerns that the FDA had in 2010 when Qnexa was rejected. Drugs are not the answer to obesity. This is one of the reasons why there are currently no effective therapies on the market when one weighs the benefit/risk profile. For most, and I agree with you, that it comes down to eating well, eating less, and being active.

    I really enjoyed and appreciated this well-informed dialogue. Hope you do well with your investments.
    Feb 7 03:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Pharma With Big Compounds: Final Dance With The FDA [View article]
    I am not casting aspersion on the Qnexa, but simply stating the documented risks involved. As a physician, you should understand that pharmacotherapy with substantial side effects and potential fetal harm is not the answer to weight loss. You stated that you would recommend Qnexa to your family members, but would you recommend Qnexa to a female family member that is of child-bearing age? This is the problem with Qnexa and why the FDA rejected Qnexa the first time. FYI: Phentermine, one of the two components in Qnexa, is a schedule IV controlled substance.
    Feb 6 11:37 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Pharma With Big Compounds: Final Dance With The FDA [View article]
    You present some valid points. I agree, and it is well known, that obesity can lead to a number of health problems. The question, then, is whether Qnexa is the right tool to address this problem. I listed the side effects of Qnexa for a number of reasons. First, a large proportion of users will be female of childbearing age and there is an agreement that topiramate is teratogenic. Second, because of phentermine, Qnexa is not a long term solution and is for short term use only.

    You stated that you are not in clinical practice, but if Qnexa is approved with a REMS, then clinically, it limits the usage and prescribing of Qnexa.

    By the way, we don't have to live on different planets to disagree. We can agree to disagree on Qnexa on this planet. Futhermore, I am not "minimizing" VVUS as I stated in the article that they have a promising compound in avanafil. Thanks for reading.
    Feb 6 08:58 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Pharma With Big Compounds: Final Dance With The FDA [View article]
    Not short here, please read the article again as I said avanafil from Vivus is promising.
    Feb 6 08:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Small Biotech Companies With Big, Promising Pipelines [View article]
    AIS will receive more attention from pharma and partnerships since their technology is applicable to many more treatments/medications out there.
    Feb 1 11:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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