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  • The Dividend-Growth-Devoid Income Portfolio [View article]
    Yes, makes sense. I was just wondering how to manage the extra risk.
    Aug 20 08:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend-Growth-Devoid Income Portfolio [View article]
    Bob,

    Are there any BDCs on the CCC list? How do you pick your BDCs? What criteria do you use? I think it's time I start learning more about BDCs. Any suggestions on the best source to educate myself?

    Thanks
    Aug 20 08:44 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend-Growth-Devoid Income Portfolio [View article]
    Surf,

    Can you explain how you use leverage to increase income? And how do you protect yourself from the added risk incurred when using leverage?

    Thanks
    Aug 20 08:38 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • A Way To Reinvest Your Dividends Based On Yield [View article]
    Thank you very much Hardog
    Aug 8 08:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Way To Reinvest Your Dividends Based On Yield [View article]
    I just copy and paste the data from yahoo.com and put it in a spreadsheet. It takes some time to set it up but once it is set up updating it is pretty easy.
    Aug 8 08:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • It's Never Too Early To Invest For Retirement [View instapost]
    Tulip,

    Sounds like you got your daughter on the right track. Unfortunately my daughter as not taken ANY of my suggestions. She often has to ask us for gas money just to drive back to her apartment. But I will keep trying to teach her. Someday maybe the lessons will stick.
    Aug 5 04:22 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Way To Reinvest Your Dividends Based On Yield [View article]
    pepe,

    Thanks for the question. I use yahoo.com to get historical quotes, calculate the yield for each of the past 52 weeks using the closing weekly price, and then average these yields.

    Concerning the 3 or 5 year average yield, I have not been able to articulate a logical reason for using the 1 year average, rather than a longer term average. All I can say is that it feels right to me.
    Aug 5 04:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why It Can Be Self-Destructive To Compare Yourself To The S&P 500 [View article]
    David,

    I'm not sure I agree with you. The reason to compare to the S&P 500, or any other index, is because that is something else you could do with your money. You could put it all in an index fund, clean and simple. So it's not just whether the benchmark you are comparing to is the appropriate one for your style of investing. It's also whether or not you could be doing something better with your money.
    Jul 31 09:07 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why It Can Be Self-Destructive To Compare Yourself To The S&P 500 [View article]
    Chowder,

    I get the impression that beating the market IS one of his goals, and he has chosen some speculative plays to try to do that. That he is failing to beat that benchmark is telling him that he is not meeting his goal and must do something different.
    Jul 31 10:23 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Way To Reinvest Your Dividends Based On Yield [View article]
    Chowder,

    You, of course make an excellent point. As always. But in my case (although I don't own it) I would be willing to trim some of an over priced CL to buy more of an equally safe, but undervalued stock such as TGT (which I do own). Or to buy new positions. I recently sold some of my positions in BA, BPL, and WAG (which I believed were overpriced) and used that money to buy positions in TUP, SO and NHI. I think got better value with the new positions while maintaining my yield and the safety of my dividends.
    Jul 31 10:15 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why It Can Be Self-Destructive To Compare Yourself To The S&P 500 [View article]
    I just feel the need to point out that I don't think most investors talk about beating the market with any one particular stock. It's always their whole portfolio that they want to beat the benchmark.
    Jul 31 10:07 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why It Can Be Self-Destructive To Compare Yourself To The S&P 500 [View article]
    Scuba,

    Excellent examples and summary of why one might choose to track a benchmark. If you are not keeping up with the benchmark that you are trying to match then you obviously are doing something wrong. And it gives you the opportunity to evaluate what you have been doing, identify the problem, and fix it. If you don't track a benchmark you will have no idea if you are succeeding in your goals.

    But let me also say that I understand that this does not apply to those whose goal is dividend income, irregardless of total return. The income will speak for itself and no outside benchmark is required.
    Jul 31 10:00 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Yield Or Dividend Growth: My Experience With Both [View article]
    DGI,

    Good article and good example. But I still think it needs to be pointed out the the decision to go with yield or growth (if one must decide between the two. You could fill your portfolio with both) very much depends on your time horizon. My calculations have shown me that it takes about 20 years for the income from low yield high growth stocks to catch up and pass the income from high yield low growth stocks. So if one has 20 years or more left to invest before they must start harvesting their portfolio I think it is best to go with low yield high growth.

    Of course this does not take into account capital gains. That is much harder to predict, but most likely the higher growth stocks would do better.
    Jul 30 05:16 PM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why It Can Be Self-Destructive To Compare Yourself To The S&P 500 [View article]
    oh, by the way Tim, where can I get your book???
    Jul 30 12:21 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What Happens When Berkshire Hathaway Pays A Dividend A Decade From Now? [View article]
    The dividend from a company that has paid and increased its dividend for the past 10, 20 or 50 years is much more of a sure thing than the possibility that a company that has never paid a dividend will start doing so in the next 5-15 years.
    Jul 30 12:20 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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