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Tim McAleenan Jr.

 
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  • 55 Dividend Contenders With Yields 50% Higher Than 10-Year Treasuries [View article]
    That's interesting, Robert. Foreign taxes are something I'm woefully ignorant on, and need to start learning. So if I buy shares of a British or Canadian firm and put it in a Roth IRA, then it's in effect the same as an American firm tax-wise?
    Mar 29 02:29 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • When Dividend Investors Get Rich Too Late In Life [View article]
    Conair! I meant to respond to your earlier comment. That's awesome.

    I'm still in awe of his recent performance in Tampa Bay (I only watched on YouTube, haven't made this tour yet):

    http://bit.ly/H3RQtj

    You know, Conair, someone could brag about having a two million dollar portfolio to me on SA, and I wouldn't feel the slightest pang of jealousy. You, however, mention that you've already witnessed the Wrecking Ball Tour...
    Mar 29 01:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 55 Dividend Contenders With Yields 50% Higher Than 10-Year Treasuries [View article]
    Hey David, I had a quick question. What's your general attitude towards ADRs? I'm assuming that if you're considering an investment between an American firm and a foreign one, you'd pick the American if all else were equal. And I know it's highly subjective, but how much "better" does an ADR have to be than an American option for you to go for it? Or I could be putting words in your mouth, and you might not even make a distinction between the two...
    Mar 29 01:18 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • When Dividend Investors Get Rich Too Late In Life [View article]
    Or maybe it's just because the D&I section houses all the party animals? ;)
    Mar 29 12:53 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • When Dividend Investors Get Rich Too Late In Life [View article]
    I noticed that too, David. I think that it's because most of the D&I crowd focus on the satisfaction of goals (as opposed to the 'quick double'), and that leads to articles being more story-like as opposed to, say, a TI-93 calculator turned into prose, and that leads to the formation of an actual personal relationship, which leads to ongoing dialogue, and then there you have it.
    Mar 29 12:46 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Liberals Should Invest Like Conservatives [View article]
    Rocco, excellent article. I never "got" socially responsible funds, mostly because I think it would be difficult to find a fund manager with the same moral compass as mine. There's probably some companies that I would have no moral qualms owning that the socially responsible fund manager would never touch, simply out of a desire to cover the bases by only owning companies that "no one" would ever object to.

    Plus morality isn't a static thing. I would have objected to owning Altria (then Philip Morris) in 1970 on the grounds that many of the people addicted to the product may have had no idea of its unhealthy impact when they began smoking, even though the tobacco companies knew. Preying on this information asymmetry strikes me as morally suspect. Now, if you buy a cigarette, I consider it a much more morally neutral transaction, since you should have known at the time you had your first cigarette what you were getting yourself into.

    Likewise, Bank of America seemed like a "morally neutral" bank back in the day, yet from the mid-1990s onward, slowly but surely started engaging in practices that seemed morally suspect (for instance, reordering a customer's checks when his account is overdrawn to maximize fee revenue).

    I think your article is right on. The problem is that all companies do something bad, at some time, in some way (i.e. drink Coke all day and you'll get diabetes, buy Lockheed Martin which sells equipment that has led to the death of innocents, and if you buy Pepsi, you have your hand on the pulse of the obesity epidemic). The list goes on.

    Fantastic article, Rocco.
    Mar 29 10:05 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Immediate Gratification Of Dividend Stocks [View article]
    A lot of people do, but I don't. I think there is a fundamental difference between the earnings quality of Coke and Pepsi versus say Microsoft and IBM. For companies like Coke and Pepsi to be doing well twenty years from now, they need to make sure they don't do a lot wrong. For Microsoft and Intel to be successful twenty years from now, they have to do things right. There's a difference there. Coke has to avoid any big blunders, but if any Big Tech went on "autopilot" or became run by a "ham sandwich", it's much more dangerous than if, say, the CEO of Procter & Gamble is that way. With that being said, I think that tech companies will be a major source of double digit dividend growth in the coming decade or two, so my strategy will be to have about 15% of my portfolio in tech--enough to enjoy the gains, but not so much as to overly rely on the sector.
    Mar 28 10:13 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Immediate Gratification Of Dividend Stocks [View article]
    I wish! Currently in classes. We get a week off in February affectionately called "Feb Break" , and then we get a week off during the third week of April when the semester ends. (We're on a trimester schedule that goes 12 weeks - 12 weeks - 4 weeks).
    Mar 28 02:13 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • My Substitute For Tobacco Stocks [View article]
    That's my big question that has kept me from drinking the Kool-Aid. I feel like the estimation of Apple's long-term (say, 10-15 years) earnings quality by the general public is greater than the reality. What if earnings decline for a year or two? What if they experience RIMM-like obsolescence on some fronts 10 years from now? That may sound extreme, but even IBM has had periods of abysmal growth (early '90s), and in many ways, their rapid growth made them the Apple of the '80s. I'm not an Apple hater, just an Apple agnostic.
    Mar 27 12:22 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Substitute For Tobacco Stocks [View article]
    deedubs, I think that you just described my thoughts exactly. My hunch is that the share buyback will end up moderately decreasing shares. That way, when investors see a bit of share count reduction, yet another reason to bump the price up. If they didn't coat the buyback program with warnings, then the reaction would be, "Two thirds of it went to executives! What gives?" I'm guessing the old underpromise and overdeliver action is at play here, although I haven't read that anywhere, and like I said, that's my hunch.
    Mar 27 11:54 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • When Dividend Investors Get Rich Too Late In Life [View article]
    Only people from Chicago talk like that!
    Mar 27 11:38 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Substitute For Tobacco Stocks [View article]
    Hey Robert. What's your reaction to the Apple dividend? I've been curious for a while to get both your and the Davids' take on it.
    Mar 27 10:35 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Investing: Resisting The Urge To Get Rich Quick [View article]
    22!
    Mar 27 09:42 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • When Dividend Investors Get Rich Too Late In Life [View article]
    In which case, remind me how the St. Louis Blues are doing this year? ;)
    Mar 27 09:24 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • When Dividend Investors Get Rich Too Late In Life [View article]
    Do I have to remind y'all who the defending World champions are??

    http://bit.ly/H9ko4W
    Mar 27 09:16 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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