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  • Will Starbucks' Investors Flip When Coffee Prices Go Up Again? [View article]
    Thank you for reading! Hope you may come visit.

    Kind regards,

    Brian
    Feb 4 05:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Look At Qualcomm's Intrinsic Value [View article]
    experienced,

    Thank you for your question. Assessing value is being able to take those qualitative factors you speak of and quantifying them in forward-looking projections to arrive at an intrinsic value estimate.

    Thanks for reading!

    Brian
    Feb 4 05:29 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Oracle's Shares Are Worth North Of $40 Each [View article]
    With all due respect, 90% of the article is based on the firm's intrinsic value calculation. Many financial advisors like to have a broad view of the software industry and it is undeniable that the firms you mention are peers within this broader industry.
    Thanks again for letting us know that EVERY company is going to have different fundaments and cannot be compared directly. This should not be surprising, and you should not get lost by this. It should be common sense.
    Thanks for reading!
    Brian
    Jan 30 12:47 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Oracle's Shares Are Worth North Of $40 Each [View article]
    Thank you all for reading! We appreciate your comments!

    Kind regards,

    Brian
    Jan 30 12:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 3D Systems May Have Further Room To Fall [View article]
    Hi all,

    Thank you for reading. We appreciate your comments.

    Kind regards,

    The Valuentum Team
    Jan 28 07:12 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Johnson & Johnson Is A Dividend Growth Giant [View article]
    goldenbear65,
    I would strongly encourage you to not only use one source in your investing framework. What we mean by dividend growth giant is that the firm is poised to significantly grow its dividend on the basis of its Valuentum Dividend Cushion score. What we mean by fairly valued is that it is trading in-line with our fair value range. We're not aware of anything fast, but there is a risk that whatever it is, it may have been hastily done. In any case, thanks for your thoughts. We like J&J because it is a solid firm and has strong dividend growth prospects. In a market where dividend growth is become more expensive to buy, we like J&J as a potential idea for dividend growth investors. We like to stick with corporate fundamentals when assessing the attractiveness of an idea.

    Kind regards,
    Brian
    Jan 27 07:24 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Seadrill's Financials Speak Of A Very Risky Enterprise [View article]
    Yes, we provide investors with the opportunity to take a free trial. If you've been following our thoughts, you may want to take a read of our website. You don't have to sign up but you'll learn more there than anywhere else. SDRL = risky.

    Brian
    Jan 27 02:29 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    Decoy0527,

    Existing goodwill is almost completely irrelevant in the valuation equation. It only matters if going forward the company continues to overpay for acquisitions. The market has already assess the possibility of value-destruction of future acquisitions in an EVA context. A write-down of goodwill will impact accounting numbers, but this is irrelevant. Unless your focused on EPS, but this has a large number of pitfalls in itself. A focus on EVA and cash-flow dynamics is paramount over any reported accounting numbers. We see this more and more in the boards of companies: executive pay being tied to ROIC not accounting measures like operating EPS.

    Thanks for reading.

    Brian
    Jan 27 02:25 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    jarco,
    Please read this: http://bit.ly/17jOILK
    If you can't access it, please contact me at brian@valuentum.com. I don't want you to continue this line of thinking that you have. Let me show you why.
    Brian
    Jan 27 02:21 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    Hi Illuminati Investments,

    Yes, to arrive at any measure of free cash flow, you adjust for depreciation and other items.

    Brian
    Jan 27 02:19 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    Hi ReligiousWacko,

    Here is a great read on how free cash flow and valuation in general.

    http://bit.ly/17jOILK

    We think free cash flow numbers in any given quarter aren't as useful as assessing free cash flow generating capacity 5, 10 years down the road. Although the future is inherently difficult to predict, it doesn't mean it is the only thing that matters in investing. Also, I think you're getting lost in the weeds and not focusing on the conclusion of the analysis. Analysts make economic adjustments from accounting numbers to better reflect economic reality. Finance and accounting are related, but they are distinctly different in that finance interprets and accounting reports. We think our consider buying price below $34 is very reasonable. We also would update our analysis if the company's fundamentals deteriorate or improve. So stay tuned.

    Thanks for reading.
    Jan 27 02:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    Christian,

    Just to reiterate, I would strongly encourage you to learn the concept of a margin of safety and a fair value range. Value is not a precise, exact fair value estimate, but a range of probable fair value outcomes. Here is what you might have missed:

    "In the graph below, we show this probable range of fair values for Salesforce.com. We think the firm is attractive below $34 per share (the green line), but quite expensive above $64 per share (the red line). The prices that fall along the yellow line, which includes our fair value estimate, represent a reasonable valuation for the firm, in our opinion."

    Thank you,

    Brian
    Jan 27 12:47 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    Christian,

    We view valuation as a range of probably fair values. We wouldn't become interested in the firm's equity until it fell below $34 per share:

    "We think the firm is attractive below $34 per share (the green line), but quite expensive above $64 per share (the red line). The prices that fall along the yellow line, which includes our fair value estimate, represent a reasonable valuation for the firm, in our opinion."

    Perhaps it is that you believe that valuation is a precise, exact point estimate and not a range. This is something that I would encourage you to learn and embrace, the concept of a margin of safety. Thanks for reading.

    Brian
    Jan 27 12:41 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    Frankly, I have no idea how these commenters are arriving at their conclusions. We've written 1,800 articles on Seeking Alpha about our process. It's about time that the community attempts to learn it. I do believe that these comments tarnish the experience for others that understand the concept of a fair value range and the Valuentum Buying Index.

    Brian
    Jan 27 12:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Salesforce.com Shares Not Cheap [View article]
    highwaytoserfdom,

    First of all, our process is value-based, not price target based. Our fair value range for Salesforce.com is $34 to $64 per share, which is based on the company's rather large range of probably fair value outcomes. We'd only grow interested in considering the firm as an addition to our actively-managed portfolios under $34 per share and on improving technical.

    Thanks for reading.

    Brian
    Jan 27 12:24 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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