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Lars Christensen
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Lars Christensen (born 1971) is Chief Analyst, Head of Emerging Markets Research and Cross Asset Allocation at Danske Bank. Earlier (until January 2001) Lars Christensen worked as an economic policy analyst at Danish Ministry of Economic Affairs. Lars Christensen has a master degree in Economics... More
My blog:
Market Monetarist
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Milton Friedman – A Pragmatic Revolutionary
  • There Is No 'bond Bubble' 0 comments
    Jun 20, 2013 3:53 AM

    Among 'internet Austrians' there is an idea that there is gigantic bubble in the global bond markets and when this bubble bursts then the world will come to an end (again…).

    But 'internet Austrians' is a fringe group so why worry about their views?

    And why blog about it? Well, because it is not only internet Austrians who have these ideas. Unfortunately many central bankers seem to have the same kind of views.

    Just have a look at this from the the Guardian:

    A key Bank of England policymaker has warned of the risks to global financial stability when "the biggest bond bubble in history" bursts.

    In a wide-ranging testimony to MPs, Andy Haldane, Bank of England director of financial stability, admitted the central bank's new financial policy committee is taking too long to force banks to hold more capital and appeared to criticize the bank's culture under outgoing governor Sir Mervyn King.Haldane told the Treasury select committee that the bursting of the bond bubble - created by central banks forcing down bond yields by pumping electronic money into the economy - was a risk "I feel acutely right now".

    He also said banks have now put the threat of cyber attacks on the top of their the worry-list, replacing the long-running eurozone crisis.

    "You can see why the financial sector would be a particularly good target for someone wanting to wreak havoc through the cyber route," Haldane said.

    But he described bond markets as the main risk to financial stability. "If I were to single out what for me would be biggest risk to global financial stability right now it would be a disorderly reversion in the yields of government bonds globally." he said. There had been "shades of that" in recent weeks as government bond yields have edged higher amid talk that central banks, particularly the US Federal Reserve, will start to reduce its stimulus.

    "Let's be clear. We've intentionally blown the biggest government bond bubble in history," Haldane said. "We need to be vigilant to the consequences of that bubble deflating more quickly than [we] might otherwise have wanted."

    I must admit that I am somewhat shocked by Haldane's comments as it seems like Haldane actually thinks that monetary easing is the cause that global bond yields are low. The Bank of England later said it was not the view of the BoE, but Haldane's "personal" views.

    If Haldane ever studied Milton Friedman it did not have an lasting impact on his thinking. Milton Friedman of course told us that lowbond yields is not an result of easy monetary policy, but rather a result of excessively TIGHT monetary policy. Hence, if monetary conditions are tight then inflation and growth expectations are low and as a consequence bond yields will also be low.

    Hence, Milton Friedman would not be surprised that Japanese and USbond yields have risen recently on the back of monetary easing being implemented in the US and Japan.

    In fact the development in global fixed income markets over the past five years is a very strong illustration that Friedman was right - and why Haldane's fears are misguided. Just take a look at the graph below - it is 10-year US Treasury bond yields.

    (click to enlarge)

    (If you think you saw this graph before then you are right - you saw it here).

    If Haldane is right then we should have seen bond yields decrease following the announcement of monetary easing. However, the graph shows that the opposite have happened.

    Hence, the announcement of TAP and the dollar swaps lines in early 2009 was followed by an significant INCREASE in US (and global) bond yields. Similarly the pre-announcement of 'QE2′ in August 2010 also led to an increase in bond yields.

    And finally the latest sell-off in the global fixed income markets have coincided with monetary easing from the fed (the Evans rule) and the Bank of Japan ('Abenomics')

    If you think there is a bond bubble

    then blame the ECB's rate hikes in 2011

    Looking at US 10-year yields over the past five years we have had three major "down-legs". The first down-leg followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers in October 2008. The second down-leg played out in the first half of 2010 following the hike in Federal Reserve's discount rate in February 2010 and the People Bank of China's increase in the reserve requirement in January 2010.

    However, the biggest down-leg in US 10-year bond yields followed the ECB's two rate hikes of 2011 (April and July). Believe it or not, but the ECB was "able" to reduce US 10-bond yields more than the collapse of Lehman Brothers did.

    Hence, if there is a 'bubble' in the global fixed income markets it has not been caused by monetary easing. No if anything it is a result of excessively tight monetary conditions.

    In fact it is completely absurd to think that global bond yields are low as a result of central bank 'manipulation'. Global bond yields are low because investors and households fear for the future - fears of low growth and deflationary tendencies. Global bond yields are low because monetary policy have been excessive tight.

    Rejoice! Yields are rising

    Unlike Andy Haldane I do not fear that day the bond 'bubble' (it is not a bubble!) will burst. In fact I look forward to the day US bond yields (and UK bond yields for that matter) once again are back to 5%. Because that would mean that investors and households again would believe that we are not heading for deflation and would once again believe that we could have 'normal' GDP growth.

    And unlike Haldane I don't believe that higher bond yields would lead to financial armageddon and I don't believe that Japan will default if Japanese bond yield where to rise to 3 or 4%. Banks and countries do not go belly up when growth takes off. In fact the day US bond yields once again is back around 5% we can safely conclude that the Great Recession has come to an end.

    Concluding, there is no 'bond bubble' and Andy Haldane should not have sleepless nights over it. The Bank of England did not cause UK yields to drop - or rather maybe it did, but only because monetary policy has been too tight rather than too easy.

    Disclosure: I have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it. I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

    Themes: bonds
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