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  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    Vroom vroom!
    6 Oct 2012, 10:43 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    Just topping off your CarboCap battery?
    6 Oct 2012, 10:52 AM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (353) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin, would you be referring to the Axion "CarboCap" carbon-metal capacitive storage (CMCS) cell?

     

    Sorry, couldn't resist.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:53 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    For those who are finding John Petersen's newest article later in the day. I would suggest you make yourself some popcorn before you start to read the comments.

     

    Electric Vehicles: Front Loading The Filth
    http://bit.ly/SI1k9r
    8 Oct 2012, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Did you notice that most of the usual suspects have been conspicuously absent? I guess they don't get out of class till later in the day.
    8 Oct 2012, 02:50 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    The comment section was painful. How can JP stand it.
    8 Oct 2012, 03:30 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Masochism ... and the reality that some of my best friends today were some of my most virulent detractors in the past.
    8 Oct 2012, 03:33 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    This one is a walk in the park compared to the usual for John's articles if Tesla is mentioned.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 03:34 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Jon, Thanks for the heads up. I needed the laugh so I went and read John's article early.

     

    It's amazing how you can put data in front of people and they will ignore it while walking to their podium to quote "The Real Facts".
    8 Oct 2012, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    "Did you notice that most of the usual suspects have been conspicuously absent?"

     

    Did you forget you've succeeded in getting some of us banned from commenting? That was just your typical twisting of a terribly flawed study, nothing new really. Luckily the comments from Dan F, Renim, geo-eng, Nick Butcher, and others, have pointed out some of the weaknesses, which you of course ignore since they don't fit with your biases.
    10 Oct 2012, 09:29 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >jrp3 ... So where are the peer reviewed studies, data & articles supporting your view?
    10 Oct 2012, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    In over four years I have only asked SA to ban ONE user from commenting on my articles. After carefully reviewing the entire history, they agreed that my request was justified.
    10 Oct 2012, 09:46 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    DRich, if you read the commenters I mentioned you'll see they provided references to back up their points.
    11 Oct 2012, 09:17 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Happy Weekend!

     

    In honor of one of our favorite contributors (and perhaps the stock at various times)

     

    http://bit.ly/Q3KIVN
    6 Oct 2012, 11:31 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    Wtb: thanks for the find. It had me at the very first line "I'm insensitive". That's absolutely me when I need to be.

     

    As to contributing stock, I can't recall the last time I sold some. All my trading blocks still sitting on the launch pad.

     

    I've got two recent very small blocks from $0.277 that will be the first to go off. My best estimate is sometime after the first of the year. If I get a double before then combined with a chance of a short-term pull back I'll probably donate them so I can add more on the pull back though.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Oct 2012, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    I suppose we'll be easier to love once AXPW hits $10 :-)
    6 Oct 2012, 12:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    Wtb: No way! Those that don't win hate the winners!

     

    "The winners laugh and tell jokes and the losers say shut up and deal"!

     

    We'll be reviled for our success, prescience and patience, and accused of "pumping" for our own benefit!

     

    This will get worse when the late-comers take the hit as normal waves up and down start when we achieve "normal" behavior status in the stock.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 03:21 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    Did you commision Lee Brice to write and sing YOUR song??

     

    357
    6 Oct 2012, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    RBrun: LoL! I'm too cheap and not vain enough to ever *pay* for something like that.

     

    Speaking of which http://bit.ly/QSDRgb

     

    One of my all-time favorites.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Oct 2012, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    HTL

     

    Ha, that was perfect! Vanity, a great value to have!

     

    357
    8 Oct 2012, 03:13 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (282) | Send Message
     
    Springs - Did you get a sense if we saw a move up to .35 we might see some of our shadow lurkers emerge from the weeds?

     

    Basically did you feel it would take news to get them to emerge or would a nice run in price suffice?
    6 Oct 2012, 11:40 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    I think once we surpass .42 (the 20% gain point for the February placement participants), there's a steady stream of folks with various price points at which they'll feel encouraged to buy more, and that the stock is more securely off its bottom. As another example, .50 will be a double off the lows which some have mentioned recently as a buy indicator.

     

    Other folks are looking for specific news items, as opposed to share price, as their reason to buy.

     

    I think - solely in my crooked tin foil hat opinion - that once we're back firmly into the .40s, there are many potential accelerants on share price, not least of which is how many non-trading shares Axionistas have accumulated and will not relinquish until prices are much higher. Of course, we are also closer to better news each day.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:03 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    After almost a year of talking about a likely supply and demand inflection, I've put together an Instablog that ties the FINRA short data to the blocks that we've known (or suspected) were moving into the market at various times over the last three years.

     

    http://bit.ly/R5OAEA

     

    I'll be fascinated to see if any of our more technically astute brethren can find a flaw in my thought process. In any event, now you'll have my numbers instead of just having my conclusions.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (661) | Send Message
     
    I first came across a couple articles by JP at the beginning of last year about Axion. I found these concentrators last November. I started with concentrator 21. The pps was around 40 cents. I never dreamed nearly a year later we would still be waiting for the company to take off with all of the possibilities in the wings at that time. I did not anticipate having to read 140 concentrators and be at 30 cents.

     

    Yet hope springs eternal. We are a year closer to the BMW contract as well as a possible US auto maker and an Asian car company. Just one of these would make Axion a wildly successful venture. Rosewater has introduced the residential hub with sales expected as soon as UL certification is received. Norfolk Southern has ordered batteries for the yard locomotive with a grant now in hand to hopefully allow the project to go forward. The regulations for the power cube grid payments seem to be on the horizon. The zero energy Navy building is currently being tested. Other projects unknown to us are also under way.

     

    The next twelve months could get very interesting!!

     

    John and the whole gang who constantly adds to the overall knowledge, thanks for making this unique opportunity available to us.
    6 Oct 2012, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Yet you forgot to mention that PJM now has regulatory authority to pay PowerCube owners to help them with frequency regulation and load leveling. This will allow Viridity to showcase the Axion PowerCube results that have been accumulating for awhile.

     

    Funny how all these items take time, yet, they seem to all need that gestation period. Hopefully it won't be a full 9 month term to fruition.
    6 Oct 2012, 09:24 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >Futurist ... I really hate to upset you but the elephant's gestation period is 22 months, the longest of any land animal.
    6 Oct 2012, 09:40 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    hmmm. 22 months. Well, we don't know how long Axion Power and Viridity Energy negotiated with PJM Interconnection to work out agreement for a PowerCube tie-in to the grid for frequency regulation. The official tie-in occurred November 22 last year. If the lead time before tie-in was anything like the lead time for adoption of new FERC compensation regs, that calf could be due any time now.
    6 Oct 2012, 10:08 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    And here I thought we were trying to eat the elephant not raise more. Well, so much for trying to get psyched up to force down that last zip lock bag full hidden behind the juice in the fridge.
    6 Oct 2012, 10:11 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Hunting is OK for food & fun, but you need a herd to thin out with the hunt. Shoot the last one and you'll go hungry sooner than you want.
    6 Oct 2012, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I can see season 1, the beginning of the new show "Carbon Alchemy" on the boob tube between Swamp Loggers and Gold Rush. First episode introduced by Maya "Swiss Whisper to Swiss Bank" How a diverse group tracked a mouse to a fortune. Probably enough material in these blogs and for those that might want to contribute a few tidbits of their own lives for a couple seasons. Gotta be better than "Honey Boo Boo". (Sorry for those not familiar with the trash on American TV (Or is it, Sorry for those that are familiar?). Don't waste your time looking it up.)

     

    Hey, It's not country song material so I'm not even looking. Alas, maybe someday. I'll settle for a decent return over 10 year treasuries (Isn't that the expectation from pennies?)

     

    Second choice for the title "Carbon Capture". But we might get sued by Al Gore for trademark infringement.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (841) | Send Message
     
    The solution to paying taxes is to increase your income to the level where you don't feel the pain.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    Albert...

     

    Try that theory out in France...

     

    Perhaps, best to have enough money that you don't need income ;-)
    6 Oct 2012, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Albert, Careful.
    Another saying is " The one thing worse than paying taxes is not having to." Or did I make that up? Anyway, I'm sure you understand the painful humor.
    6 Oct 2012, 02:48 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I had a fascinating chat with HTL a little earlier where we talked about Enders Dickenson's comment that the Concentrators were a great resource for him because Axionistas seemed very adept at finding bits and pieces of information that he didn't know about.

     

    It occurred to me that what we may have here is the first "crowd-sourced due diligence forum" where a hundred inquiring minds conducting their own investigations are able to dig up more useful information than a staff of full time researchers.

     

    I've known the Concentrators were unique for a very long time, but think the real strength may be the talent of the crowd.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:38 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3167) | Send Message
     
    I've posted about the tremendous value of our approach/process. It has the potential to go way beyond just AXPW.

     

    For example, imagine this: our 20 million shares becomes worth $50 million. Reinvesting just 1/5 of that means we can muscle into a favorable deal with another extremely promising microcap. Which I'm convinced Axionistas will find, eventually. Then live off some of the remainder, while waiting for the company to flourish.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:38 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6168) | Send Message
     
    Yes, and because it has the potential of a major source of useful information, we need to be diligent about culling out deliberate attempts of inserting disinformation into the proceedings.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:55 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >All ... Amazing what a little moderating will do for a topic on the I-Net pipes.
    6 Oct 2012, 02:01 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Ah, the new 20% RULE. True Axionistas will hold back 20% of their profits to consider putting into another microcap venture. I'm sure we all have learned that not doing this on the open market is best. Maybe we can be one of those wonderful "offering" investors.

     

    At first glance I would say impossible. With this group, I'm thinking I'm in.
    6 Oct 2012, 09:29 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    PowerCube like storage market heats up (as we knew it would):

     

    Altairnano Selected for Puerto Rico 26 MW San Fermin Solar Project

     

    Published: OCT 3, 2012 - 10:00 ET

     

    http://bit.ly/R1mhdE

     

    "provides twice as much power in a container almost 25 percent smaller, and can achieve peak power of 3.6 MW. The batteries are housed in a standard forty (40) foot container that also includes fire safety, heating and cooling, and computer systems necessary to safely and economically operate the system."

     

    Mentions of reduced costs, but of course, not actual costs.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:42 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/Wzqd5O

     

    ALTI-ESS Product Brochure: http://bit.ly/OJVgfN
    6 Oct 2012, 12:51 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    WT,
    I just scanned through the info. I hope they don't have the same problems with fires like in Hawaii and China. That is a lot of lithium in one spot.
    6 Oct 2012, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (353) | Send Message
     
    Has anyone heard any more about the Hawaii fire and the Xtreme batteries? I couldn't find anything in a Google search.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:01 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (353) | Send Message
     
    This is the most recent article I could find (22 Aug) that says Xtreme is planning to rebuild and that the cause of the fire is still under investigation.

     

    John, was there any discussion at the ELBC about this?
    6 Oct 2012, 01:05 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I didn't hear anything new at ELBC, although there were rumors floating around about 80,000 tons of molten lead clean up.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:12 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (353) | Send Message
     
    At least it can be recycled.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3440) | Send Message
     
    Wouldn't that much lead make the island tip over?
    6 Oct 2012, 01:36 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >481086 ... Probably on the opposite side of the island from the erupting volcano.
    6 Oct 2012, 01:38 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    Wtb: I wonder if we should accept the challenge.

     

    "Only Altairnano achieves a 4C rate at the extended cycle life required for grid regulation".

     

    HardToLove
    6 Oct 2012, 02:33 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1782) | Send Message
     
    Stilldazed,
    From my years of investing in ALTI, before I sold and invested in Axion, I believe they will not have the same problems. One of the things that drew me to ALTI's chemistry initially was its stability. Their batteries aren't as sensitive to cold or heat as most Li-ion batteries are and they can take fast charging with little damage. The only problem, of course, was that for that stability they took a hit on the total amount of energy that the batteries could hold (very similar to PbC vs AGM). So the batteries work well for big vehicles like buses, and for large storage facilities but aren't great for BEVs.
    6 Oct 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I always get a kick out of companies boasting on their C rates. It can be useful if you want to make a preliminary calculation of the size of the battery pack needed to absorb a given current, but I have a pretty clear sense that it's not good for much else.
    7 Oct 2012, 01:34 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    LabTech,
    Thanks for the info. Don't know anything about the company other than the link I scanned from WT. After all the temp sensitive stories and battery explosions and battery storage fire stories in the last few years it was the first thing that came to mind. My second thought was a fire company showing up to a lithium storage battery fire with a water hose. (not a good thought)
    7 Oct 2012, 03:17 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    It's a good indication of charge and discharge rates, exactly what it's meant to be, and an important metric to consider in many battery applications. What else should it be good for?
    7 Oct 2012, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    It's an indication that's useful when searching through catalogs to try and figure out which products might satisfy your needs. It's irrelevant as soon as you get your first test samples and begin the laborious work of finding the best battery for your particular needs.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    I do hope Axionistas study that brochure closely. Every time someone talks about how the PbC is the only solution I bring up Altairnano and Toshiba SCIB. The titanate chemistry also has the advantage of no self discharge, unlike the PbC. The question remains if the titanate chemistry can compete on cost but it is a potential threat to PbC.
    In full disclosure, as I've mentioned previously, at this point I'm long both AXPW and ALTI.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:44 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Ultimately that's what horse races are all about.

     

    Everything I've read about titanate chemistries says they'd work just swell in micro-hybrids. The competition will all boil down to system costs (including power electronics, BMS and thermal management) and the relative scalability of the two technologies.

     

    I think you'll find that the OEM segment of the auto industry could absorb ten to twenty times the combined global production capacity of all lithium-titanate manufacturers combined. That capacity will not scale quickly, cheaply or easily. A competitive threat that can't attain RELEVANT SCALE in the near-term is no threat at all.
    7 Oct 2012, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6168) | Send Message
     
    Here is an interesting article comparing environmental impacts over the life cycle of conventional and electric vehicles. Here are a few of the conclusions:

     

    EVs appear to cause a higher potential for human toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity, freshwater eutrophication, and metal depletion impacts.

     

    EVs zero tailpipe emissions contributes to reducing urban air pollution which has led to the general perception of EVs as an environmentally benign technology. The reality is more complex, requiring a more complete account of impacts throughout the vehicle's life cycle.

     

    EVs are a means of moving emissions away from the road rather than reducing them globally.

     

    Only limited benefits are achieved by EVs using electricity from natural gas.
    (If I was writing an article on this subject, I would gather some more references on this point before going with it.)

     

    In the absence of foreseeable improvements to electricity mixes, a more significant reduction in global warming potential could potentially be achieved by increasing fuel efficiency or shifting from gasoline to diesel ICEVs (internal combustion engine vehicles).
    http://tinyurl.com/8kj...

     

    -----
    The weakness in the article is it does not mention hybrids. Hybrids use much smaller batteries than an EV, and they can result in fuel and pollution reductions in the vicinity of 20 to 25%. If the hybrid happens to be powered by a PbC, the battery is completely recyclable. A key point John has been hammering on for some time. There is a nice list of references in the article too...
    6 Oct 2012, 01:49 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I'm looking forward to studying the article in detail.
    6 Oct 2012, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6168) | Send Message
     
    I was thinking of you as I read it John.
    6 Oct 2012, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    One of the more interesting aspects of the study was the conclusion that battery production represents 35% to 41% the production phase GWP of an EV and even with generous assumptions EVs were only one-quarter better than ICEs. So if you go to a car like the Tesla Model S that uses a big honkin battery to combat range anxiety, the negative up-front impacts of battery production more than offset the long-term benefits of using electricity instead of gasoline.
    7 Oct 2012, 03:32 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I'm interested in how the government regulators are going to handle their various efficiency ratings for vehicles like the new Tesla. Each of the vehicles, depending on battery size, needs a different rating because of the battery mass. And the efficiency gets worse as you satisfy your urge to temper your range anxiety because you're hauling around all that mass and rarely using it if you believe to average commute numbers the EV/government stats guys are feeding us (no reason not to believe them).

     

    It's kind of damning because an ICE vehicle sheds mass as you drive so you can kind of figure an average mass, rough numbers, somewhere between 25-75% of a tank. And the energy density is very high. With the BEV your mass never varies regardless of how full your tank is and the energy density is very low. It's very damning to choose the wrong size tank and once you choose, you got it for life. Even if your commute changes. A life sentence! ;)
    7 Oct 2012, 09:04 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    "I'm interested in how the government regulators are going to handle their various efficiency ratings for vehicles like the new Tesla. Each of the vehicles, depending on battery size, needs a different rating because of the battery mass."

     

    You mean the way ICE's offered with different engines have different mpg ratings? I figure they'll handle it the same way, by testing them and coming up with a rating.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I spent some time going through the article and the supporting detail this morning. The conclusions were absolutely amazing. The most intriguing part of the summary said:

     

    "We find that EVs powered by the present European electricity mix offer a 10% to 24% decrease in global warming potential (GWP) relative to conventional diesel or gasoline vehicles assuming lifetimes of 150,000 km. However, EVs exhibit the potential for significant increases in human toxicity, freshwater eco-toxicity, freshwater eutrophication, and metal depletion impacts, largely emanating from the vehicle supply chain."

     

    If you dig back into the data tables, you find that the "significant increases" mentioned in passing are as follows:

     

    human toxicity – 356%, primarily in manufacturing
    freshwater eco-toxicity – 271%, primarily in manufacturing
    freshwater eutrophication – 369%, primarily in manufacturing
    metal depletion – 294%, primarily in manufacturing

     

    While EVs have ±23% lower total life cycle CO2 emissions, emissions from EV manufacturing are over twice the emissions for ICE manufacturing.

     

    They're basically front-end loading the filth and calling it clean.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    "It's very damning to choose the wrong size tank and once you choose, you got it for life. Even if your commute changes. A life sentence! ;) "

     

    :-) Maybe not. If one starts with a small tank and adds trailers (aerodynamically efficient designs of course) loaded with more tanks.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Now there's an idea! A battery manufacturer could partner with Thule to make a line of roof mounted auxiliary battery packs for the active EV owner.

     

    http://bit.ly/SLN9tW
    7 Oct 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >D-inv ... Are your trailers self propelled? I just can't shake the picture in my mind of a Mitsubishi MiEV dragging around a PowerCube.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    D-inv. I'm a fan of that model for EV's. But alas it's a band-aid for a tech. that's not ready for prime time in my opinion. It all comes down to cost.

     

    BTW, I feel the same way about buying ICE vehicles that make no sense. You know, the large monster SUV or truck with the single driver coming out of the super market with a few bags of groceries and that's the closest it comes to peak utilization.

     

    I tried to justify in my mind during the late 80's buying a new stripped down full sized work truck for about 10,800 USD. It was close to the peak time in my life I could have used one for it's intended design purpose. I couldn't justify it. The main reason ended up being future family needs but even as a pick-up for hauling things I struggled. It was mostly for base single person transport.
    7 Oct 2012, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    "D-inv. I'm a fan of that model for EV's. But alas it's a band-aid for a tech. that's not ready for prime time in my opinion. It all comes down to cost."

     

    :-) And parking space!
    7 Oct 2012, 12:23 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    It is a neat idea, JP.

     

    Thule builds a standardized battery pack and mount and builds battery rental stations across the nation. You drive through and have the empty battery replaced with a fully charged unit robotically in two minutes.

     

    Add an extra battery pack for long trips, just like having an extra external battery for the iPhone when you go on a trip.

     

    You are not sitting on the lithium bomb and can eject it from the roof with an emergency release lever if it bursts into flames.

     

    It would be a major infrastructure project that is years away from current reality, but a neat idea, nonetheless.
    7 Oct 2012, 01:57 PM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (252) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin: "It is a neat idea, JP."

     

    Need to be careful putting much mass high on the vehicle ....
    Causes rollovers on turns ...
    7 Oct 2012, 09:25 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (353) | Send Message
     
    What about outriggers?
    7 Oct 2012, 09:40 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >Renzo ... I like it. The "Catacaran"
    7 Oct 2012, 09:43 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1782) | Send Message
     
    Not to mention that you are going to have to have some way to wire the battery pack back to the engine. Just what I want, a couple of exposed, electric lines running down the side of my car as I'm driving down the highway during a thunderstorm.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:06 PM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    "They're basically front-end loading the filth and calling it clean."

     

    No, they are showing them to be cleaner over all, how much being dependent on the grid. Of course as the grid gets cleaner so too does much of the manufacturing processes.

     

    From the study conclusion:
    "The production phase of EVs proved substantially more environmentally intensive. Nonetheless, substantial overall improvements in regard to GWP, TAP, and other impacts may be achieved by EVs powered with appropriate energy sources relative to comparable ICEVs."
    8 Oct 2012, 08:46 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    That's simply not true, and within an hour or all SA Users will find out why in all the grisly and unpleasant detail.

     

    The only place EVs have any advantage is CO2 emissions, and that modest advantage rapidly disappears when you increase battery pack size beyond 24 kWh.
    8 Oct 2012, 08:57 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    Here it is

     

    Electric Vehicles: Front Loading The Filth
    http://bit.ly/SI1k9r
    8 Oct 2012, 09:02 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I plan to blame it all on FPA. If he hadn't provided an intriguing link and they hadn't provided reams of supporting data I wouldn't have written another Tesla article until they filed their September financial statements, which will show a working capital deficit in the $60 million range and a stockholders equity deficit in the $30 million range.

     

    The Devil Made Me Do It.
    8 Oct 2012, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    I suspect the facts made you do it.

     

    There's far too few people in favor of environmental solutions who truly consider the whole picture of how environmental propositions are; and far too many who subscribe to superficially good looking ideas without considering all the environmental impacts.

     

    Thanks for being the former. We need more.
    8 Oct 2012, 09:22 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    The really crazy part is the way the study's authors down-played the toxicity increases. I think they knew their conclusions on global warming would be controversial enough and didn't want to emphasize the other horrific environmental consequences we're heaping on the planet today in order to obtain a fuzzy CO2 benefit years from now.

     

    In a couple hours, heads will be exploding throughout the Golden State.
    8 Oct 2012, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6168) | Send Message
     
    Mainstream press has picked up on that article... Here is the BBC's report: Electric cars 'pose environmental threat'. http://tinyurl.com/9ez...
    8 Oct 2012, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I think this is one of the most important studies I've seen. The detail in the Supporting Information is extraordinary. I just hope that some of the MSM types will start acting like journalists and analyzing the facts instead of writing fluff pieces based on abstracts and press kits.

     

    Let me thank you once again for providing the link to the report.
    8 Oct 2012, 12:08 PM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    The study makes huge assumptions that are simply not correct. It's not a good study at all. Which of course will not stop you from waiving it about as if it were the gospel truth.
    10 Oct 2012, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (516) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » JRP3: "Which of course will not stop you from waiving it about as if it were the gospel truth".

     

    Disagreement is OK. Statements likely to turn the concentrator into a personal battleground aren't.

     

    Please avoid them as a consideration to all participants.

     

    APH
    10 Oct 2012, 10:35 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    You're far more tolerant than I would be APH, but I guess that's why you're the APH.
    10 Oct 2012, 11:17 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    A little press for the Hub ...

     

    http://bit.ly/VJR7Zi
    6 Oct 2012, 03:43 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1920) | Send Message
     
    Hi Stefan: One certainly gets the sense we are the "early adopters" to a new investment paradigm shift after reading that "inaugural" issue.
    6 Oct 2012, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    A123 offers a blog note on PJM starting "pay for performance" on 10/1

     

    "Everybody Hertz: PJM Implements Compensation Model for Fast-Response Frequency Regulation
    Posted by Eric Hsieh on Fri, Oct 05, 2012"

     

    http://bit.ly/UsE6W9
    6 Oct 2012, 05:12 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Great article. Easy to respond to Blog. I like that guy Battery Geek. He's everywhere. Hope Killacycle is there to greet him.
    6 Oct 2012, 09:44 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    :-) Battery Geek! Who could that fellow be?
    6 Oct 2012, 10:15 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Speaking of A123, I thought their Grid Storage Youtube video was well done:

     

    http://bit.ly/QIslWq

     

    referenced from their Gird Storage Solution page:

     

    http://bit.ly/OfSJbz

     

    I think JP mentioned word that AXPW was working on a new web presence. They would do well to look at A123's pages as something that's pretty effective.

     

    One of A123's customers is AES. Their list of energy storage projects is getting pretty long:

     

    http://bit.ly/QIsmcJ
    7 Oct 2012, 01:21 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I've heard nothing about Axion making plans for a new web presence, although some Axionistas think it could use one. While I've had a web presence for almost 20 years, I think their value and utility varies from business to business.
    7 Oct 2012, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Quite right. Some searching reveals it was Vani via Rick K:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    "Brief note from Vani:

     

    Rick,

     

    Appreciate the comments. We are working on a new web site. Should be out shortly. Abstract for the SAE paper is available on the SAE web site already. We will post the full paper on our web site after 10/2.

     

    Regards,

     

    Vani Dantam
    "

     

    I knew there was an insider involved somewhere :-)

     

    ... was thinking it was Enders D. in Paris.
    7 Oct 2012, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    JP, Seeking Alpha sent me an email on Oct 9 alleging I had incorrectly reported your "... plans for a new web presence" post as abusive. As with the similar email regarding an HTL post, 'twaren't me what dun 't. Nothing in your post was offensive in any regard.

     

    I've asked SA support for assistance/recommendat... on identifying the cause and/or means of the "Abuse" reports that are getting attributed to me. Hopefully, resolution of the problem reports can be achieved before another is generated.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:21 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    I've done it two or three times since I have been on here by accident.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:34 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    It's surprisingly easy for folks to inadvertently click the "report abuse" links, particularly if they've got a trackpad mouse with a tap to click feature. I think SA is accustomed to dealing with those kinds of problems and the moderation team seems to do a pretty good job. They occasionally get it wrong, but that's true of any system operated by humans.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Me once as well. It's kind of stinks but people understand.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:42 PM Reply Like
  • Lafferty
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    D-inv: I've noticed that it is especially easy to accidentally hit the report abuse button on a mobile, touch-screen device, if you perhaps use one of those. SA ought to make you *confirm* your desire to report abuse; and it would save them work as well. You might suggest it to them since you are already dialoguing with them on the problem.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:04 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for that suggestion, L. I have yet to use a touch screen device, but the laptop i was using last week has a pretty quirky touch pad. The cursor simply leaps to a new location from time to time when one is typing on the key pad and on occasion the screen will scroll up or down a page view or two for no apparent reason.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:47 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the kind words, JP. I do use a trackpad mouse and have noticed recently that my "taps" are sometimes "doubles" instead of singles. Generating an inadvertent single tap from time to time is a possibility. (Not sure I want to think about that possibly very much since my maternal grandfather and all of his children who survived 70 or more years died of Parkinsons. Two of his grandchildren now have it (one younger and one older than me.))
    9 Oct 2012, 12:19 AM Reply Like
  • rgholbrook
    , contributor
    Comments (116) | Send Message
     
    Hmmm, Elon Musk, closet Petersen reader?

     

    Petersen: "...kill the electric car, drive a stake through its heart..."
    09/25/11
    Mr. Musk on Space Solar Power : "Stab that bloody thing in the heart"
    10/04/2012
    6 Oct 2012, 08:49 PM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    Or maybe Bram Stoker? It's not exactly a "Petersen original".
    7 Oct 2012, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    New Sandia Report.

     

    "Protocol for Measuring and Expressing Performance for Energy Storage Systems"

     

    http://1.usa.gov/RIYC0Z
    6 Oct 2012, 10:59 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Well it's a start. Tons of work to do yet.

     

    Of interest. LAB industry supported by ALABC. So no JCI and Exide. But we have East Penn represented by their Deka brand and Axion?
    7 Oct 2012, 12:48 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    It's encouraging when government and industry recognize that system level standards will be a key driver of potential growth. For years I've been driven nuts by readers that quote capabilities and costs at different levels (e.g. cell, module, pack), and frequently with different levels of power conversion, control and management electronics. I'm a simple creature and like the idea that the Residential HUB provides an identifiable series of benefits and has a specific price. While SKUs will be a challenge for storage systems, the industry really needs to go in that direction.
    7 Oct 2012, 01:56 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    It's always good when an industry finally recognizes they need to get together and select the right tools for testing and deliver the right parameters to the end user so they can select the correct solution for their needs. You'll not hear that statement at the annual snake oil sales convention.
    7 Oct 2012, 09:13 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Way OT.

     

    Since we're typically critical of Mr. Musk.

     

    Kudos for St. Elon where it's warranted. Wish he and his team well.

     

    Private SpaceX Cargo Ship Launching 'New Era' for Space Station Today

     

    http://yhoo.it/ULGaTO
    7 Oct 2012, 09:20 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    The fascinating thing will be watching Tesla's stock price gyrations based on the success or failure of the SpaceX mission, even though the only thing the two companies have in common is the Iron Man. If the Dragon performs well, you can look for a boost in Tesla's price. If something bad happens, Tesla's price will probably suffer. Steve Jobs developed a cult following after his return to Apple. Tesla has elevated CEO worship to an entirely different level.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (8921) | Send Message
     
    "Since we're typically critical of Mr. Musk."

     

    Indeed, and oddly so, considering his many past and continued successes.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Yes, He's had some great successes. That doesn't mean that I have to blindly follow him into his subsequent ventures. I think he's done great things at Space X. I also think he's done great things at Tesla. That doesn't mean I think the latter will be a success.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    The world is littered with the wreckage of immense personal fortunes that were earned in the IT world and then squandered in unrelated industries that the IT genius did not understand.

     

    Mr. Musk may be a renaissance man who can effortlessly flit from information technology competence to industrial competence. On the other hand, he may not be as universally talented as acolytes believe.
    7 Oct 2012, 12:38 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1782) | Send Message
     
    John,
    It makes sense if you look at it from the perspective of Elon's ability to always be a white knight to save Tesla using money he makes from SpaceX. Look at their latest public offering. If I read correctly, Musk purchased around 1/4th of the stock offering. It was probably a lot easier to get favorable terms when Musk puts up that much of his own money to buy the stock. However, if SpaceX has a couple rockets malfunction, well then there may not be a sugar daddy available to bailout Tesla if they continue to have problems ramping up Model S production.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:16 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Musk bought a big chunk of the June 2011 offering, but only about $1 million of the latest round. – http://1.usa.gov/R8MX98
    7 Oct 2012, 11:47 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1782) | Send Message
     
    Ah, my mistake. I thought I read he purchased 1 million shares, not $1 million worth of shares. I've got to stop reading things at 3 am when my daughter wakes me up because she's had a bad dream.
    8 Oct 2012, 05:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Some add'l vehicle electrification efforts of interest.

     

    Valeo makes your car engine hybrid (Hybrid4All)

     

    http://bit.ly/SLKqAO

     

    Heat pump uses ambient energy for interior heating in e-cars

     

    http://bit.ly/ThtF6p

     

    Aisin Seki Co pioneers economic electric water cooling pump.

     

    http://bit.ly/SLKqR2

     

    Obviously the automobile is going to be electrified at a number of different levels EV or not. And they all require better batteries because the overall loads are going up and they need to do thinks like peak shaving and load shifting to make it happen. It is really just a micro grid.
    7 Oct 2012, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    Valeo's little contraption is interesting, am trying to recall seeing something similar.

     

    Just as a comparison:
    Toyota Prius:
    60 kW motor
    213 volt battery

     

    Valeo Hybrid4All
    15 kW motor generator
    48 volt battery:

     

    Wonder if the Valeo system would be a good fit for the PbC or would better suit and energy battery? Would like to see Axion, if they get further EPA grant money, develop a vehicle with 48 volt architecture - if automakers are indeed headed that direction.
    7 Oct 2012, 05:39 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Metro, Big difference in safety concerns when you talk 48VDC vs 213 VDC systems. If I recall correctly the auto industry decided up to 60 VDC was a limit before you start having to consider significant added layers of protection for safety reasons.

     

    I think until you start getting into utilizing the battery as a gas tank (JP's expression unless he borrowed it elsewhere) charge acceptance and power is more important than energy density. You want to be able to fill and empty the energy reservoir quickly and efficiently. Yes both need a level of both but you'd optimize the hybrid more for power and the PHEV/EV more for energy density.

     

    48 VDC has been a dream in the auto industry for quite some time. I think they will get more serious but perhaps still keep it a split voltage system for various reasons. Note the timing Valeo claims it will take for the first application to get to market. And they have probably already been testing it for some time. Axion doesn't have the time or the money to worry about 48VDC most probably for some time.

     

    PS I read a recent article on the Prius and they claimed significant savings bumping up the voltage to a higher level on the new generation vs the older models (some models perhaps?). Since Power = V x I you can reduce the wire sizes and the electromechanical device sizes if you bump up the voltage. This is not to say it's easy as there are many challenges when you do it.
    7 Oct 2012, 06:19 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Running a test vehicle with a 48VDC system would be no big deal and only require four 16-volt PbC's in series (to account for reduced voltage at PSOC). As I recall Axion's already done that with GM, or at least the grant application from last year said they were going to (had).
    7 Oct 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Understood John, It isn't a big deal. No harder to test than any of the other testing Axion is doing. I'm just looking at the timing and I think some of the other stuff is much further along. I'd loved to be called wrong with a news release.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    iindelco - thank goodness Axion does not have to worry about waiting for 48vdc ... otherwise, it would probably go bankrupt a couple times over waiting or have some crazy number of shares outstanding. In everything I have read, it seems the only viable stepped up voltage is some type of split system as you describe.

     

    On another note, gas prices are getting to their highest ever b/c of a couple refineries going down ... Not a bad thing for Axion if gas prices are high.

     

    http://nyti.ms/R8CAlR
    7 Oct 2012, 09:57 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Stephan,
    " Not a bad thing for Axion if gas prices are high."

     

    It might be good for Axion ( although immediate revenue does not seem to happen for this company no matter what) but it certainly will not be good for the economy. I think Axion needs a stagnant to slow growth economy to sustain and grow. A fast growing economy might pass Axion by, for soon to reach into the future (Lithium) answers. A recessive economy helps no one.

     

    I get your point but I do think Axion is really sensitive to the Macro economic environment.
    7 Oct 2012, 10:36 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3440) | Send Message
     
    Note also that one of the refineries went down due to a power outage...
    8 Oct 2012, 12:51 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    86,
    Maybe they should buy some PCs.
    8 Oct 2012, 01:34 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, Wife is on a mini trip to see the youngest in Virginia about 1 hr from DC. Gas price NY 4.05 USD. In PA (Maya country) $1.91 (lower state taxes). In VA near DC 3.64 USD. Why do you think that is? I have a conspiracy theory.

     

    CA, Well, Sometimes you get what it is you're working for.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Does it follow the same theory going around about the BLS stats?
    8 Oct 2012, 06:07 PM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    Paid $4.89 yesterday for Premium to fill my bike(SF bay area).
    8 Oct 2012, 06:39 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, Not exactly but they do both have to do with influence. The end justifies the means. The US is becoming a nation where being a conniver is OK.

     

    As an example;

     

    One Algorithm Made Up 4% of Quote Traffic Last Week

     

    http://yhoo.it/SZkUJ5

     

    Is this really what the capital markets are intended for? Silly me. I thought they were intended to match up capital with people that needed money to create goods and services.
    8 Oct 2012, 07:02 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... What a quaint idea you hold.
    8 Oct 2012, 07:30 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Found this table on state taxes so it explains some of the difference. Falls outside of my quaint idea.

     

    http://bit.ly/QPWVyP
    8 Oct 2012, 09:15 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I think your list is interesting, particularly the lowest. I haven't looked of this in a long time. We really do get a break on price & use a lot here in the USA.

     

    http://nyti.ms/OPr2YH
    8 Oct 2012, 09:58 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I've been paying European gas prices for the last 15 years and am always amazed when I get back to the States and have to fill the tank on a rental. The one good thing I can say about $8 gas is that it really makes me think twice before driving 100 miles to Geneva or Zurich because the shopping or entertainment options are better.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:03 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Thanks, I've seen some of those numbers before so I'm not shocked.

     

    And as you suggest, behold, there is some correlation between cost and usage.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:23 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I've oft wondered if the USA used an increase in gas taxes for the same purpose some other counties use it. England finances a big chunk of their health system with transit taxes.

     

    Here in Texas we nearly had lynch mobs storming the Capital over a rise of just $0.06 to maintain the roads and keep from having to build toll roads. In 2008 & 2010, resistance was incredibly intense from here in Dallas & Houston. Now they have these privately owned roads (in exchange for just $3B on a 50 year license) people are complaining about an average $110/month commuting bill here in N. Dallas. I here it is much worse in Houston because you can't there from here any other way. Thank God & Rick Perry that my state avoided bond debt.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:36 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (872) | Send Message
     
    how expensive is it to take the train?
    8 Oct 2012, 10:37 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Both of the gas tax links are very interesting ... I knew that was the case, but had never seen the breakdown in amount of taxes by state before.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:38 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    DRich, I had a line in my last post about the complexity of how these funds are deployed in other countries but ended up deleting it. So I'm just smiling because you brought it up. It was mentioned in a article I read awhile ago that Japan was the best at taking the moneys raised by their petrol taxes and deploying them toward their road infrastructure.

     

    In NY we have one primary toll road and it was supposed to end when the road was paid for years ago. Well, Once governments get a funding source they rarely live up to their promise. Now the funds are being used for things that have nothing to do with roads and they don't even maintain the road very well any more.

     

    PS Some people that don't use those roads probably think God and Rick Perry did a fine job. Who knows? Everything has at least two sides.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:00 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... As a matter of principle (which rather baffles my kids), I will not use a toll road. Dallas isn't too bad (we have frontage roads for business) but Houston is a challenge.

     

    I remember 9 & 9D from Po-town to Fishkill quite well. I believe I lost more than one shock & a ball joint on them. I believe that stretch of road redefined my understanding of "pothole" ... and then I found the Cross Bronx and lost an A-frame.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:14 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Sounds like you may be paying a pretty good sum for your principle in this area. Sometimes it's worth it.

     

    My way of looking at it is one way or another you're paying a toll for every road. Just different payment methods. I'll take the most efficient path and just complain!
    8 Oct 2012, 11:34 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I just don't believe roads should be privately owned. A Pogo sayin'; "We all duz wha we hav ta duz"
    8 Oct 2012, 11:44 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3440) | Send Message
     
    I'm with you on this one DR. Toll roads don't sit well with me either. Keep American roads free and open, from sea to shining sea. And I pay gas tax gladly.
    9 Oct 2012, 01:41 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1218) | Send Message
     
    Since I moved to just one block away from my workplace, I always get sly smile when I hear folks complaining about their horrendous commutes and high gas prices. Living in downtown San Antonio where we can walk or ride a bike most places has been a great lifestyle decision for my wife and me. A tank of gas lasts me almost two months.
    9 Oct 2012, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    San Antonio is a great location for a sensible lifestyle radius. When you can arrange your life to work, shop and play in a small area, it gets simpler and more pleasant, and it pays huge recurring dividends in perpetuity.
    9 Oct 2012, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    The toll roads are some of the worst maintained roads. If all the taxes collected were actually spent on the roads we would have the best highway system on the planet. This is a very depressing subject for me...
    9 Oct 2012, 10:24 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Tim, I'm sure you've seen some pretty ugly things. Of coarse when you have a bad tool in your hand all the time you can appreciate the deficiencies more than someone who uses one far less and adapts.

     

    In Mexico, don't know if you've been much, they don't enforce speed limits that much. What they do is put speed bumps randomly all over the place. Even on major roads. You can easily adapt if you're a local but if you're all over the place like in your current occupation, Ughh. I had a sore neck for a week one time when one of the engineers I worked with got to yappin and forgot about one of the bigger speed bumps. Drove both of our heads into the roof. I, being of a little taller stature, fared far worse. Not that uncommon at all to see rigs in the ditch near these speed limiting bumps.
    9 Oct 2012, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, I have experienced a couple Mexcian taxi rides over speed bumps and around them into the ditch and back. I have even experienced a high speed bus trip in the middle of the night where I was certain we went up on two (5) wheels. The driver in all cases seemed very calm unlike the gringo passengers who left imprints in the door handles...

     

    PS I also have first hand experience with local government "creatively" using transportation funds for other things...
    9 Oct 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Tim, Well then you know.

     

    Thank God for Newtons laws and gravity!
    9 Oct 2012, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    Amen to that!
    9 Oct 2012, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (10774) | Send Message
     
    Tim: Juz wait until you ride in from San Pedro Sula to Copan. The Hondurans are really creative, in that there are all kinds and types of speed bumps. Some are signed, some come without notice. Some are huge, some are tiny. There's rumple strips, big steel round things, little steel round things, sometimes the steel half-orb thingys would only be on one side of the road, then there's some cement speed bumps that would leave a Corvette teetering....

     

    You'd be jake braking at night just out of fear.

     

    Of course, then at night, you would be sleeping in your cab with a couple hundred other trucks at the border. Closed every night.

     

    Also love how at check points, the police or military throw tug boat ropes across the road. Like 15 stout guys in military garb toting automatic weapons won't make you stop.

     

    Last time arriving in Copan, about five miles out of town, a mudslide had taken about a million cubic tons of mud, stone and boulder, and deposited it on the road. The road there widened to about 150 yards, underwhich somewhere before was a narrow two lane pothole strewn road. There was the high road. There was the low road, both serpentine amongst boulders that would have rolled right through your 18 wheeler.

     

    Never got fixed during my three month long stay. And still wasn't fixed when I came back about two months later for another month.

     

    Of course, more speed bumps had been installed in towns along the way.

     

    In just two months and four days, you'll be making that journey!
    9 Oct 2012, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    And I can say, with much enthusiasm, that I am very much looking forward to the adventure! Thank you for adding some color to my travel arrangements <grin>...
    9 Oct 2012, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • Deamiter
    , contributor
    Comments (164) | Send Message
     
    Even worse -- the vast majority (75-90% depending on the road) of tolls go into the infrastructure for collecting tolls, not into the roads.

     

    We're paying a HUGE premium for a usage-based user fee vs. a simple gas tax that rises with inflation!
    10 Oct 2012, 07:23 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    10/5/2012: AXPW EOD stuff partially copied from instablog (up later).
    # Trds: 68, MinTrSz: 160, MaxTrSz: 82950, Vol 387473, AvTrSz: 5698
    Min. Pr: 0.2965, Max Pr: 0.3079, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.3000
    # Buys, Shares: 61 277213, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.2999
    # Sells, Shares: 7 110260, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.3002
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 2.51:1 (71.5% “buys”), DlyShts 233663 (0.603%)

     

    We had a strange occurrence today of a single identifiable trade that exactly matched the “short exempt” quantity in today's FINRA-reported short sales data. This is a rare event. Moreover, someone suggested the quantity is quite close to the estimated remaining shares held by Quercus. Adding to the intrigue is the fact that ~10% of daily volume is ~35,224 shares so if this was Quercus-related it is a big exception to past behavior of limiting transaction to 10% of the day's volume. What's the magic number? 82,950 shares were reported as “short exempt” and a trade went at 15:52:22 at $0.30 for that quantity. Adding to today's exceptionalism is the fact that 49 trades, or ~72.1% were at $0.30, accounting for 330.8K shares, 77.6% of the day's volume.

     

    More to come, but I took the weekend off ... more or less.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    an interesting start to the day's trading session.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I always hate it when you rich guys with real time Level II access say something is interesting but don't say what IT is. Now I have to wait 15 minutes to see what's interesting.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    John,
    Also am only commenting based on 15 minute lag. Real time may be totally different. Maybe we could get a group rate on Level II access. Can only see that zero shares have been traded after 30 minutes. Also see best bid is .30 and best ask is .305 on otcmarkets.com

     

    And while I'm still editing, see that 10,000 shares just traded, albeit 15 minutes ago.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (287) | Send Message
     
    TDAmeritrade ThinkOrSwim platform provides free Level II quotes.... just open an account, no deposit required.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:18 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    Thanks dastar,
    Being overseas, no online brokerages will allow me to open an account as I don't have a U.S. driving license. Sounds bizarre, I know, but went through about four online brokerages. Last resort was opening brokerage account through my bank, and they charge me considerably more than $9.95 a transaction - let's just say it doesn't encourage trading.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:22 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    >Metro, I suspect our cheap trading US brethren would be appalled by the fees and stamp taxes European banks extract from customers who buy or sell small-cap stocks.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (287) | Send Message
     
    I'm afraid to ask but not at all surprised.....
    8 Oct 2012, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I suppose you guys are talented enough to figure out a way around it if you so desired. I can see the little satellite dish at the US embassy now. Horn glowing in the middle from all the expat activity! Euro HUB-US fees on US soil!

     

    Anyway, just kidding. Other ways I'm sure.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    John,
    What's interesting, to me, is whether or not it's acting as expected. In this case it is so far. Narrow spread, ATDF jumping to the head on both sides, our bigger players doing their usual "Holding down the fort" sor far by not moving, ...

     

    Consolidation continuing thus far.

     

    After yesterday's oddball action, I suspect today will be very low volume with little price movement yet.

     

    Speaking of yesterday, I've been mulling whether all of yesterdays $0.30 stuff and narrow spread was a MM-induced move to satisfy that 82K+ order. The behavior is so unusual, without some kind of catalyst, that it makes me quite suspicious.

     

    But I guess *that's* not unusual at all.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 11:00 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Friday almost looked like a big seller camped out at NITE and did a slew of cross-trades within the NITE book that only showed up as a single count transaction. Anything else wouldn't allow the FINRA short interest to go over 50%, which it did by a very wide margin.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • snowbirdac11
    , contributor
    Comments (32) | Send Message
     
    I have tdameritrade free level 2.

     

    At 11:06, I saw .305 ask 9810 shares by ATDF , next ask of .31 - 5,000 shares by EGRO and .317 - 10,000 shares by UBSS.

     

    Since I had some dry power, I placed 10k order at .305 at 11;06. and took out the .305.

     

    Then, I was able to take out the .31 with 5k order at 11;08:45.

     

    However, I was not able to take out the .317 10k UBSS with my 11;10:56 10k purchase at .317.

     

    It appears there is no big seller with unlimited supply of .30 this morning. May be JP inflection is happening.
    .
    8 Oct 2012, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    We won't know for sure until we see it in the rearview mirror, but things are acting odd out there.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    That's certainly a possibility. But the big short exempt going at $0.30 put's me in a conspiracy-theory mode, based on the description from the alleged former market-maker's description of how MMs take special care of their larger customers so they don't lose the business.

     

    BTW, the close yesterday was above the 50-day SMA - that's sort of a big deal for this stock as it has come back below in a few days recently, even though the 50-day was declining.

     

    This time feels different to me and I'm expecting consolidation in the $0.30-$0.33 (the unexpected, by me, resistance we saw recently).

     

    What might happen after that is something I don't think about yet. We do have a falling resistance from our descending channel around $0.322 ATM and I don't know if that's really going to come into play. If it does, that might be the resistance in our short-term consolidation process.

     

    I just hope we don't move to medium and long-term consolidation. I'm tired of consolidation and down, ...

     

    Right now we do have a 4-day trend (including today so far) of up with three of those days having higher highs and higher lows - a positive. It's been enough to cause more of the traditional TA oscillators to become decidedly more positive.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • snowbirdac11
    , contributor
    Comments (32) | Send Message
     
    Update
    11:29:35, NITE had an ask of .31 - 10k
    I placed another order of 10k @.31, again I was able to take it out.

     

    It is looking more and more like small retail seller at .31.

     

    As to the .317 10k UBSS ask, it was still there.

     

    I will pass the baton to other Axionistas.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:37 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    When the inflection arrives I don't see the $.33 resistance level as strong because I don't think we've drawn the attention of the MoMo crowd just yet. Frankly I feel the same way about the $.42 level, but less strongly.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:39 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    Congrats on the new shares snowbirdac11 and thank you for sharing the details.

     

    Interest seems to be percolating. I'd imagine some of the sellers at these prices are disciplined traders/investors booking profits from purchases in the last two weeks.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (841) | Send Message
     
    Metro,
    I live in Bermuda and am British. Rarely visit the USA.
    Several years ago I managed to open a TDAmeritrade account on my own with no problem. No requirement for a US drivers license.
    Maybe the rules have changed?
    My only obligation is to file a W8-BEN form once a year.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    I'm with you on the strength of the $0.33 because it was only once that I'd seen it. But since it did do the number on us, we can't dismiss out-of-hand until we see what it looks like when we get there.

     

    I expect at least a short pause there because of 1) it's recency and 2) folks that might be profit-oriented that bought <=$0.30 will be tempted to take some off the table.

     

    Large buying pressure could obliterate the resistance in short order, but we don't have indications, yet, that such will materialize.

     

    Those concerns are my biggest risk at the price level I think. We had 18 straight days of VWAP price < $0.30 with appx. volume of 6.31MM shares traded. If, say, 1/3rd are short-term profit takers, and *all* the shares traded 10/2 through Friday were sold for profit, we still have around 1.53MM shares to eat through before we might move on. I don't believe *all* those shares were sold for profit.

     

    The obvious flaw in all this is that not all the shares during that 18-day period were bought so what I've posted is nothing more than a ballpark worst-case scenario.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    It's all guess work at this point which is why I keep saying it will be a great education for me. This time around I'm paying close attention.
    8 Oct 2012, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    thanks albert,
    I am going to research it.
    8 Oct 2012, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    DOE/EPRI Electricity Storage Handbook - in Collaboration with NRECA -

     

    Another report from Sandia. Interestingly, it appears Axion maybe chose not to participate in the cost database?? Slide 10 & 12

     

    http://1.usa.gov/PP33DF
    8 Oct 2012, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, Did Axion ever have more than about 20% of their power cube available on line? I don't remember them ever indicating an increase beyond what was required to participate and flex the hardware/software.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    Axion is still at an awfully early stage to be going on the record with cost data. With one working electrode line it doesn't have any of the purchasing, staffing or learning curve efficiencies that people commonly lump into the term "economies of scale." It's basically one step removed from a custom job shop.

     

    That will all change over time and I expect the cost of PbC batteries to drop significantly as Axion grows, but I'm delighted that Axion is charging a fair price today and avoiding the temptation to make promises about when production costs might fall or what they might fall to.

     

    My back of the napkin materials cost calculations indicate that the PbC could have a material cost comparable to an AGM battery if it can find a cheaper way to protect the current collector. There's just no telling at this point what the real pricing might be.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (328) | Send Message
     
    This appears to be a comprehensive report. I would think Axion would want to be represented in this type of industry analysis by a respected third party like Sandia. Puzzling that Axion is not included. Any ideas why they would opt out?
    8 Oct 2012, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    iindelco - Not that I know of.

     

    John - I agree completely with your assessment.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3167) | Send Message
     
    We haven't talked much about cost improvements, at least in awhile, as we had been focused on present-day challenges.

     

    However, what do you guys think? "Axion's future goal, ...is to become the leading supplier of carbon electrode assemblies..." I would expect that cost will be a big item to address at some point---does the company partner with someone who can help them lower the cost of the assembly, not only thru economies of scale but thru design, or not? Could be an enticing alliance/partnership with someone who has better R&D know-how or $. Lower the cost far and fast enough and even huger (hey, I live in ChiTown---we can make words up and end phrases in prepositions and stuff) mkts await. Lithium smishium.

     

    Back to the present day---31 cent bid now.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:40 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Rick - my basic view is that the manufacturers of the different ESS systems want to provide numbers on the front end that make them more attractive; however, then they struggle to meet those numbers on the back end.

     

    B/c of JP's reasoning and OEMs going to New Castle, I don't think its necessary for Axion to provide numbers at this point. However, Axion was listed the other day in another DOE presentation. As a result, I think Axion simply declined to participate.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    >MrInvestor, I'm not sure that a partner would help much in the economies of scale department because there's nobody who makes a similar component.

     

    One of the big challenges we faced in 2008 was finding ways to mass produce the electrode assemblies. We ultimately had to design the production process from the ground up and have equipment to do the work designed for us. While there places in the R&D effort where partnering might prove beneficial, I have no idea whether real opportunities exist, or for that matter whether Axion is interested. We worked very hard to keep other companies from getting their claws into the PbC technology. I don't expect that dynamic to change.

     

    On the commercialization side it won't surprise me a bit to see Axion enter into several different kinds of joint agreements with battery manufacturers who want to see an electrode facility in close proximity to their battery plant.
    8 Oct 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4807) | Send Message
     
    >Ricknplano ... My guess for Axion not wanting to be included in anything like the cost analysis from Sandia is that Axion doesn't want to be a battery manufacturer. At least not for very long. The object is to get its product into many on that list and let them compete among themselves. Remember it's all about the Personal Computer, "Intel Inside", marketing model in the long run.
    8 Oct 2012, 12:05 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3167) | Send Message
     
    JP---I was thinking the econ of scale would come mostly from large orders, so I was trying to seperate out the design partnership function, such as a cheaper way to protect the current collector. Maybe Axion already has an improvement in mind, but not yet the time or $ to pursue it. Or maybe someone else does or could better then the company, in which case Axion could maybe outright buy it once they have the $.

     

    Fun to speculate, as we all know the competition isn't standing still, either, and as we know that for some functions and prospective customers (e.g., Ford) the PbC cost is currently too high. Would be great to knock it down and grab even more orders, or at least lower the price risk.
    8 Oct 2012, 12:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, The big manufacturers will look at the numbers Axion provides for where they are today and where they think they can get to with scale. They they will deep dive the process and understand where Axion can get to. The large manufacturing companies have the tools to better understand where Axion can take this than Axion does. Not at the fringes based on the physics but via tools to assess how a global supply chain would optimize the entire process.

     

    Their global purchasing will know the market cost of the materials, their manufacturing experts will look at their line (even minus the proprietary stuff covered up and come pretty close to where they should be if the process were optimized. And they will ask Axion what they are working on for cost reductions and impart that in the numbers. It's what they do and they have a war chest full of tools to do it well.
    8 Oct 2012, 12:52 PM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (328) | Send Message
     
    That sounds logical. Thanks
    9 Oct 2012, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    http://1.usa.gov/PPbNJO

     

    Interesting line in this presentation - Secondary Goal – To support FOA 36 sect 2.5_Innovative technologies through their “Second Valley of Death.”
    8 Oct 2012, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    For those that are interested - here is a link to the last Electricity Storage Handbook published in 2003.

     

    Beware its 513 pages.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/TlTi5T

     

    For ZBB people - update on IIT

     

    http://1.usa.gov/PPdRlh
    8 Oct 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • steeleydock
    , contributor
    Comments (33) | Send Message
     
    Gregorian calendars, elephant gestational periods, shooting the last of the herd...I just love this group. I hope Axion is half as enjoyable.
    S
    8 Oct 2012, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    You need to watch this crowd very carefully S, they're both funny and smart.
    8 Oct 2012, 12:11 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    You forgot addicted - a significant factor.

     

    :-))

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    I thought this group was supposed to be anonymous where we're each free to discuss our own addiction but expected to refrain from discussing the addictions of others?
    8 Oct 2012, 01:19 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    Lol John!

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 01:28 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I don't know if this was posted. Rosewater doing some social networking. I like their presence in Canada. Gives access to a wonderful market and my feelings are they know how to break open markets at a level Axion is unaccustomed to.

     

    http://on.fb.me/SNQybI

     

    http://bit.ly/PjJXLc
    8 Oct 2012, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (287) | Send Message
     
    I friended Rosewater on FB via your link. Have a up close pic of the Axion vehicle charger and a couple of pics of inside the Axion plant.
    8 Oct 2012, 01:55 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    You know, there was a time when I think we all thought Rosewater was the dark horse in the race to make Axion certainly viable. I suspect they aren't "dark" any more, but truly may win the race to provide some volume to Axion.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    HTL, I don't know if Rosewater will take Axion to the top of the mountain we all hope for but I suspect they will give rhem some legs when they need it the most. And if not it will not be for lack of trying. It's good for us to see some of the energy going on from a sales perspective. Can't see it on the industrial side as much because it's so hush hush.
    8 Oct 2012, 02:07 PM Reply Like
  • timzinski
    , contributor
    Comments (93) | Send Message
     
    Canadian Solar is headquartered in Ontario. I am hoping Rosewater Energy will provide Residential Energy Hubs and/or Power Cubes for Canadian Solar installations. That way my long positions in CSIQ and AXPW will both appreciate. Win-Win for me!

     

    TimZ
    8 Oct 2012, 02:35 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3167) | Send Message
     
    Some pushing and shoving going on on the buy side. Bids moving up---31.9 cents at the moment.
    8 Oct 2012, 02:29 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1920) | Send Message
     
    up, up, and away boys and girls!
    8 Oct 2012, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    "Easy there big fella"!

     

    Normal late-day weakness should appear ... and has just now.

     

    If I'm right and get my wish, it'll be a steady "grind up", not a SpaceX phenomenon ... for now.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 03:26 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1920) | Send Message
     
    ok.... I'm down with a slow grind up...
    9 Oct 2012, 12:55 AM Reply Like
  • mds5375
    , contributor
    Comments (165) | Send Message
     
    This article may explain our BDC guest at the last shareholder conference:

     

    http://nyti.ms/PM8zYJ

     

    "Henry R. Kravis of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts. Private equity firms like Kohlberg have amassed large reserves of cash.
    It is a $1 trillion game: Use It or Lose It.
    The private equity world is sitting on that 13-figure sum. It’s what the industry calls dry powder. If they don’t spend their cash pile snapping up acquisitions soon, they may have to return it to their investors."

     

    (If link doesn't work, Search on "More Money Than They Know What to Do With Andrew Ross Sorkin")
    8 Oct 2012, 03:33 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    Really bouncing around on trades of less than 1,000 between the bid and ask...
    8 Oct 2012, 03:48 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    With ATDF at the top on both sides, the MM can see the book and likely just trying to generate a little business by taking little nibbles to paint the tape a bit.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    HTL,
    Agree, it appeared that the MM was trying to generate a little volume by bouncing around price, but then returns to circa .3190.
    8 Oct 2012, 03:57 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    Closed near the highs. One more up day strings 3 up days in a row... and we're up 4 out of 5... nice change of pace at least.

     

    8 Oct 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    So where's MoMo?
    8 Oct 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4084) | Send Message
     
    MoMo is eating dumplings http://bit.ly/Rrq6WS waiting for 3 up days in a row on his/her point and figure chart.
    8 Oct 2012, 06:12 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    10/8/2012: APXW EOD stuff partially copied from next instq update (when?).
    # Trds: 42, MinTrSz: 325, MaxTrSz: 14990, Vol 222663, AvTrSz: 5302
    Min. Pr: 0.3000, Max Pr: 0.3190, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.3106
    # Buys, Shares: 19 112325, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.3144
    # Sells, Shares: 23 110338, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.3069
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1.02:1 (50.4% “buys”), DlyShts 31000 (13.9%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 28.10%

     

    I thought I'd get this in here. I'll try to get a little un-lazy before the A.M. and provide a little context. I do have time to get the chart in my insta updated before dinner, so I'll get that updated in the next 20 minutes or so.

     

    HardToLove
    8 Oct 2012, 06:35 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30639) | Send Message
     
    As of Friday afternoon my Quercus Balance Estimate, or QBE, sat at 46,312 shares left. Assuming my estimate is good, Quercus should have been responsible for about 22,000 shares of today's 31,000 shares in reported FINRA short volume. It will be fascinating to see what happens to the short volume when QBE=O by Wednesday or Thursday of this week.
    8 Oct 2012, 09:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I must admit that I'll be happy to leave the conversation of the Q.T. fund in past concentrators. It's been an important but long winded conversation. I love Oak trees but I'll gladly throw this one in the fire pit.

     

    But hey, I thought the same thing about .Special Sits and they're back. That left a bitter taste in my mouth.

     

    This is not to suggest I think this might happen with Quercus.
    8 Oct 2012, 10:31 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Not sure how much momentum money comes out on sub $1 stocks. But one never knows what Mr. Market has in store tomorrow.
    8 Oct 2012, 07:07 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (2076) | Send Message