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  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    One moment please: I'll be the first?
    Carlos.
    16 Oct 2012, 07:55 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Way to go Carlos!
    16 Oct 2012, 08:03 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    Thanks.

     

    A123 says it will be in default on debt payments; 30-day grace period; bankruptcy an option

     

    http://bit.ly/R7Y0AI

     

    Good Day!!!
    16 Oct 2012, 08:10 AM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (869) | Send Message
     
    Not for A123.
    16 Oct 2012, 08:12 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Let's just say not before the election.

     

    In addition to the Form 8-K filing from A123, the Wanxaing Group filed an Amended Schedule 13D yesterday that disclosed A123 had 314 million shares outstanding on October 1st (excluding shares issuable to Wanxaing) which is more than double the 147 million shares outstanding on June 30th.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/WgHcfy

     

    They truly have been printing stock faster than Uncle Ben prints money.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:02 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    AONE:

     

    It seems that definitely goes bankrupt.
    From Bloomberg: Electric Car Battery Maker A123 Systems Files Bankruptcy

     

    http://bloom.bg/SY0lR0
    16 Oct 2012, 09:07 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I guessed wrong!

     

    Based on the report last night I would have bet almost anything that the Chapter 11 filing would be delayed until after the election because the last thing the Administration needs is another black-eye.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:12 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    Bankruptcy!!!! is Bankruptcy.

     

    A123 Files For Bankruptcy:
    http://onforb.es/TYs8T7

     

    ...A123 makes rechargeable lithium-ion batteries for electric cars. The company has been hurt by the slow development of the electric car market.

     

    Incredible but true: "The company has been hurt by the slow development of the electric car market".
    Sorry, I should not say: Very bad for AONE, but very good for AXPW.
    Carlos.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:23 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Weirder by the minute.

     

    A123 just announced that JCI will buy its automotive assets for $125 million. The stockholders are toast but it will be fascinating to see how things develop.

     

    http://yhoo.it/WhFn1U

     

    My guess is the Chinese got a NO on the tax credit and grant issues.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    Another important news:
    A123 Systems Reaches Agreement To Sell Automotive Business Assets To Johnson Controls.

     

    http://yhoo.it/WhFn1U
    16 Oct 2012, 09:36 AM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    Ya beat me too it, Carlos!

     

    Edit: and JP
    16 Oct 2012, 09:43 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    This has been a hell of a year for Chapter 11 bankruptcies.

     

    January 26, 2012 – Ener1
    July 12, 2012 – Valence Technology
    October 16, 2012 – A123 Systems

     

    And let's not forget the sale of a majority interest in Altair to the Chinese in July of last year.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:51 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    Mr John:
    Finally, Litium Ion will not be a contender in Start-Stop. As You says: "Baby Steps".
    Carlos.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:57 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    Carlos: Didn't JCI have a Li-ion one they were developing?

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    After Bankruptcy and assets sells: I think we will have to re-read several articles:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    Many things change, but finally AXION POWER (PbC Tech.) emerges as winner. Is My opinion.
    Carlos.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    JCI-Saft was the headline DOE ARRA Grant recipient in 2009 with a whopping $299.2 million award.

     

    When it became clear that automotive was not ramping as expected, JCI and Saft had a parting of the ways in September of last year when JCI bought Saft's interest for $145 million. – http://bit.ly/V4kQsO At the time they spoke of refocusing their marketing on stationary and other applications.

     

    The big curiosity question in my mind is whether JCI will be given access to the $125 million or so in DOE grant money that A123 hasn't spent yet.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    Here is an article from JCI and my hometown paper.
    http://bit.ly/TtKMwz

     

    I never realized that A123 supplied batteries to BMW.

     

    The only bad news I see about this is with all of these small battery makers going under the legal, finance and supply chains folks are going to be more reluctant to deal with these 'Upstart battery companies'.
    16 Oct 2012, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    A123 was supplying batteries for BMW's ActiveHybrid vehicles.

     

    http://aol.it/wmKB5R

     

    It was probably a few hundred cars a year.

     

    http://bit.ly/Qqd1hc
    16 Oct 2012, 03:56 PM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    I have the feeling that it is an offer that did not come to a successful end. Many things can be happening under the table on a day like today and The devil is always in the fine print.
    Carlos.
    16 Oct 2012, 04:36 PM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    A123 Bankruptcy Gives Romney New Example of Green ‘Loser’

     

    http://bloom.bg/V7dhHn

     

    ...Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney called the bankruptcy filing by battery maker A123 Systems Inc. (AONE), which received a $249.1 million U.S. grant, an example of President Barack Obama’s failed green-energy policy.

     

    Good night to all. Carlos
    16 Oct 2012, 07:01 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Volume is non-existent so far for XIDE (13k /avg 232k), JCI (341k /avg 5.1M), ZBB, ACPW (4k), ENS (4.5k /avg 427k) and AXPW (14k).

     

    Some jitters in the energy storage world to be sure.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:48 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    It will be interesting to see if JCI can make that part of the business profitable, or if they have just purchased an albatross. Perhaps the first step where Maya's dream comes true in which Axion purchases JCI.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    I think it is a great move by JCI. $125M for manufacturing facilities in Michigan, Romulus and Livonia as well as some stuff in China is a steal beyond measure. They recently spent that much on building just a single AGM manufacturing plant in Ohio.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    There's also a pretty good chance that the $120 million in DOE grant money A123 hasn't spent yet will be available to JCI where it might not have been available to the Chinese.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Metro: My dream was for JCI to choose Axion as a stop/start partner. At the July SC, I asked TG if Axion was in any discussions or interactions with JCI. TG answered that there were no discussions at present. This is despite the fact that several years ago JCI hired Axion to test JCI's AGM battery versus the PbC. TG's tenor indicated to me that JCI was not a future perspective partner for/with Axion. Now we know why...and the only question that remains to me is how in the heck did JCI pull this off with such alacrity?

     

    As a long time, generational owner of JCI, and from all I have learned here in the Axion Power Concentrators, I have mixed feelings about JCI buying AONE. From an assets, and potential government money standpoint. I like it. But IIRC, AONE never sold a single battery for a profit...so how will then JCI?

     

    My conclusion/speculation is that JCI will be targeting AONE's product heavily toward utility stationary storage and mass transportation, like SEPTA, as soon as possible. (I believe there are still billions the DOE has available for subsidies and grants) Then maybe down the road someday, if JCI can somehow make lithium economically viable for stop/start applications, they will target stop/start in more than dribs and drabs.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The Wanxaing transaction just begged for a domestic white knight to come in at the 11th hour and take the deal away. Politicians were in an uproar over the possible loss of A123's incredible technology to China and when you get right down to it JCI's a logical buyer. It's also big enough that A123's assets, liabilities and operating loss (if any) will simply be buried in JCI's power solutions group where it can either succeed wildly or fail quietly without anyone knowing the difference.

     

    Since A123 will theoretically be keeping it's stationary, commercial and government business units (which incidentally have no property, plant or equipment) I suspect JCI will to focus its efforts on automotive and let A123 be a principal customer for the other markets.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    John, Agreed with your thoughts that the AONE BK would most likely be stalled until after the election. The JCI transaction makes this whole mess far less offensive for the Obama administration than even the thought of the Chinese walking away with cheap assets and perhaps advanced tech. Even for me.

     

    JCI's getting a great deal and they are already in the space so they can rationalize it far more effectively. Also, Having stronger backing helps them market the tech more effectively. Some of the auto companies have to be breathing a sigh of relieve as well.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:26 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1697) | Send Message
     
    Agree that its a great move for JCI. EVs and hybrids are the future--and part of the present for that matter.

     

    EV/hybrids already make good sense for fleets and fixed routes and A123 has (had) real customers in that niche, including BAE systems, Volvo, and Navistar (eStar van). I bet JCI knows what it is doing.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It may be a very good acquisition for JCI. Unfortunately we'll probably never know because A123 is little more than a rounding error in JCI's battery business.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Agreed. JCI's market cap is presently $17.68B. Buying AONE and their IP rights, plus keeping those rights here on domestic soil (also to please the DC politicos) for $120M is chump change.

     

    Yes, also agree that AONE's technology could easily fail quietly within JCI's gargantuan market cap. Further, it could be a really slick move if JCI can latch onto the $125M DOE available grant money, and actually make a $5M profit right from the get go with this catch a falling star, AONE purchase.

     

    AONE stock right now? Down 74.87% to ~ 6 measly cents! From a 2009 high of $25.77.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    To access the remaining grant money JCI will have to build out new facilities and plan on 50% DOE matching, so it's not free. But if the business goes somewhere in JCI's more experienced and prudent hands the available funding could be important.

     

    The shame in all this is that JCI's purchase price for A123's assets is roughly equivalent to the DOE's investment in those assets.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    John, In theory, wouldn't the board have to weigh the stockholders interests as part of this process. So if the Chinese offer ended up yielding the stockholder say 0.10 USD and the JCI offer yielding say 0 USD doesn't that weigh pretty heavily?

     

    Could be why the stock is still 0.06 USD as JCI might have to offer the stockholders something. But alas the bond holders usually come first.

     

    Anyway, My first point on stockholders interests are what I'm most interested in hearing your opinion on.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the clarification, JP. Still a pretty slick deal for JCI. Especially when conjoined with JCI's purchasing York a few years ago. Another potential product JCI has now to sell along with their building energy management systems.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:17 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1697) | Send Message
     
    John, your insights into JCI/AONE, the battery business, and corporate behavior in general are much appreciated. Thank you.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:20 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The stockholders are toast unless A123 can make some sort of business out of its retained rights or somebody comes into the Bankruptcy Court with a much richer offer.

     

    The proceeds of the asset sale will be $125 million, but A123's total debt is closer to $350 million.

     

    JCI gets the gold mine on the back of a pre-pack Chapter 11 and the stockholders get the shaft. It's not necessarily fair but I learned as a youth that the fair only comes around for a couple weeks in the fall.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:33 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Thanks John.

     

    "JCI gets the gold mine on the back of a pre-pack Chapter 11 and the stockholders get the shaft. It's not necessarily fair but I learned as a youth that the fair only comes around for a couple weeks in the fall."

     

    A double header! You're just loaded with em! :))
    16 Oct 2012, 02:48 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    There's always a possibility that somebody will come in and outbid JCI in the Bankruptcy Court, but I'm not going to hold my breath.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:56 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Wow! I go away for a couple of days and all hell breaks loose! So, now that we see that JCI is buying A123's auto battery division, am I the only one who is assuming that we now have an answer to what Li-ion battery JCI is planning on putting into their new dual battery case that they just filed a patent for??
    17 Oct 2012, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It's really hard to say what's going on at JCI. An analyst friend from Paris has suggested that JCI isn't getting much traction on batteries from the $600 million plant it ended up with in the JCI-Saft divorce. Adding A123's assets may not improve that position markedly. It will be interesting to watch, but I don't think many conclusions are possible at this point.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    John,
    The deal, IMHO, also points out that what some call a white knight, I call a vulture who was waiting for the victim to be too weak to prevent getting its eyes plucked out. I don't know how many times I've seen the arguement that if the PbC was really a game changing technology then a company like JCI would jump at the chance to buy them out. Really? Is it that they don't want the technology or is it that they don't want to pay for the technology? I'm sure if Axion wanted to file for chapter 11 tomorrow JCI, Exide, or some other company would be more than happy to buy its assets. Exide thought they were going to get the company in 2009 before management got the stock placement that saved Axion from BK. I'm sure that JCI and others hate this little group, since it has acted as a buffer for the company. Our continued willingness to purchase the stock, has allowed Axion to survive a fall in stock value that would have killed most companies.
    It also points out your claim that debt financing is never the way to go. We may complain about the stock price, but if Axion doesn't have debtors waiting at the door demanding payment, then they still have a way to keep the company going and continue its growth towards profitability.
    Alright, back to painting my hallway.
    17 Oct 2012, 07:27 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Well said, LabTech.... well said
    17 Oct 2012, 10:22 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The two cardinal rules of small company finance are:

     

    1. Take the money even if it hurts; and
    2. Don't promise to pay it back.

     

    Violating either rule before you have sustained predictable positive cash flow from current operations is a kiss of death. Operating credit lines, equipment leases and mortgages are an exception, but debt securities are a killer. I don't even like dividend paying preferred stock.
    17 Oct 2012, 11:12 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Does anyone know how much energy NS 999 draws from the grid to replenish 2nd Law losses and how much it costs?
    16 Oct 2012, 09:51 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It's very hard to tell how much energy the NS 999 will draw from the grid on a daily basis, but with a 500 kWh battery array it shouldn't need to recharge more than once or twice a day.

     

    The real benefit on a switcher is that the darned things burn about 100,000 gallons of diesel per year and spend about 80% of their time idling. No matter what the electricity costs it will be a rounding error compared to the fuel costs.

     

    When you factor in the pollution reductions from not burning 100,000 gallons of diesel a year in urban rail yards, it's a winner in several respects – or at least it will be if the PbC holds up as well as we hope it will.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:58 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >billa_from_sf ... The layout of the NS999 still shows the regen brake system, though not the resistor banks & fans. Leads me to believe that there will be recharge from recovered energy during operations (with blowers just expelling any excess heat or could just use a cut-out). This makes it hard to figure what operating expenses will be, thus testing and a few years down the road we will find out some more substantial data or make a guess from sales/conversions.

     

    Any way you look at it, either from costing 1/3 of a genset or less maintenance or quiet EPA lowered pollution compliance or no-idle fuel savings ... if this set of batteries work it will not matter what the charging infrastructure of electricity costs.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Any estimate on how long it takes to recharge?
    16 Oct 2012, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (502) | Send Message
     
    It was the energy recovery that killed that previous batteries. Charging from the grid is easier to control. They may have been able to reduced the charge rate, but then too much energy may have been lost to get through a work period. Even with Axion batteries, there will be operational differences between fueling with diesel vs charging that will need to be established.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Great question, WTB.

     

    However, I would bet that even the NSC engineers don't yet have an answer, since we know the limits of Dynamic Charge Acceptance for the CarboCap PbC system remain poorly defined.

     

    How long would it take to charge 500kWh of batteries at 200A, or 400A? Would NSC even have a trackside charging cabin capable of supplying 400A?

     

    How fast can you cook a "green weenie?"
    16 Oct 2012, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    WTB, Your question really has two answers.

     

    How fast can it be charged and how fast does it need to be charged. I think they will charge it based on it's duty cycle. This will vary over time. In the end there is no sense having a charger that can charge the batteries in 4 hours from 20% SOC if you're never discharging below 40% SOC and you have lots of times to opportunity charge (an example). They will map out how the 999 will be used and set-up the charger for worse case duty cycle.

     

    Chances are the real benefit of the PbC is what others have indicated. How well can it take the regenerated braking currents available?
    16 Oct 2012, 11:03 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The other thing that may be important is the 80% of the day that most switchers sit idle. With a track-side charger that may give rise to lots of opportunities for opportunity charging instead of running the batteries all the way down and then all the way back up.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Thanks to everyone for your thoughts on NS 999 grid usage.

     

    John's point that switchers idle for much of the day burning diesel fuel gave me a bench mark that is easy to visualize.

     

    Given that comparison, and PbC's regenerative charge acceptance, it is hard to imagine that NS 999 will burn anywhere near the conventional energy a diesel switcher would to do the same amount of work.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    This reminds me of what happened with the electric tugs and belt loaders that we had at the airlines. The ramp rats working never charged the batteries even though they were idle most of the time so when guys would try to use them they weren't ready. I'd estimate utilization similar to these switchers.

     

    What I don't know about a rail yard is are the switchers basically parking in a few spots per day. Could one add a vertical line above those certain stations that are like how street cars are electrified on European streets but instead the electrification is there to provide power to recharge the battery. No plugging in which while more difficult upfront gets rid of the human problem assuming parking/idle areas are consistent. Less efficient and a greater captial cost but still should make it economically worthwhile?
    16 Oct 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >mrholty ... Been there done that back in the 1930's for yard work in Chicago. Third rail system was also tried and quickly failed. Was determined to be too costly, maintenance intensive and subject to too many failures. True, is was to run all electric locos but think about the expense to just provide opportunistic charging for 5-15%. NS999 has a designated charging station just like the diesels have fuel racks. It got to be a lot cheaper (with very little direction) to get engineers to mind the batteries.
    16 Oct 2012, 05:35 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >wtblanchard ... Can only guess because I know nothing about the service or the system. NS999 carries 1000 hp worth of batteries. If you use a standard 3-phase AC grid connection and the batteries are limited to 200 amps, from total discharge it could take 5 hrs (realistically 8 hrs). But from there you're on your own to guess because it is doubtful it would ever go flat and we know the batteries can take up to 400 amp (more?). So many ways to skin this cat it is not really worth trying to guess.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    If only Red Bull owned the switcher ...

     

    we would have real time video and state of charge displays online :-)

     

    and most of us would be watching it sometime during the day :-)
    16 Oct 2012, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Whatever Red Bull spent on the space jump was made up in spades on the advertising gains. Everyone advertising is looking to capture "mind space". Red Bull got tons of it from Felix's jump and will garner even more as the documentaries roll out on TV shows.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    Much better than watching paint dry!
    16 Oct 2012, 04:16 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Here's an interesting thought, given JP's concerns about resource constraints:

     

    Has Apple's iPad Success Made The Cobalt Price Soar?

     

    http://onforb.es/V4rbEp (Says no.)

     

    How many iPads can be made with the Co in one Tesla Model S?

     

    Which product will the world markets clamor for the most when Co prices start to rise?
    16 Oct 2012, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin, Tesla is not using cobalt chemistry in the model S. Most don't as it's considered a less stable chemistry even though it has great energy density. They did use it on the prior model.

     

    Why Tesla Went with Panasonic

     

    http://bit.ly/Ttt6Ba
    16 Oct 2012, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    I believe the Tesla S still uses Cobalt in its LiNiCoAlO2 cathodes, according to Wikipedia and Nick Butcher:

     

    "The lithium-ion battery consists of more than 7,000 battery cells for the 85 kW·h pack.[31] The battery pack uses Panasonic cells with nickel-cobalt-aluminum cathodes.[1]" http://bit.ly/M5Sadm

     

    "The next constraint comes with LiNiCoAlO2 (as Tesla uses in the Model S)..."
    http://bit.ly/Wiqn3P

     

    But who am I to quibble over a toy I would never own?
    16 Oct 2012, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin: umpteen millions vs. planned 5K production? No question who wins that particular battle is there?

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 11:28 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Our little flood of risk-averse folks did 6 trades in less than one minute of 131.5K shares taking pps from $0.32 to $0.305.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    I sense a shift. We're seeing gamers now having far more impact than the large distressed sellers.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:44 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    When something big happens for Axion all this .305 to .32 crap will go out the window anyway!
    16 Oct 2012, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Soon hopefully Bang soon. But until then we can at least enjoy the change in the trading pattern which gives some level of assurance that the old weak guard is now weak or gone.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:54 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: Short-term only. Guess where those shares went when "fear" gripped the sellers. Did the buyers have "fear"?

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    HTL, Certainly stronger hands but buyers don't buy without some level of caution (you can sense it in the atmosphere here at times). Generally a far healthier balance for sure. One, I would hope where rational decisions take precedence over fear as a far higher percentage of the new owners.
    16 Oct 2012, 12:28 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    We need a spy at the yard in Altoona to report on 999 usage. Maybe we can raise some "dark program" funds! Unfortunately it is not just up to the batteries. It is also up to the locomotive subsystems NS designed and how they operate it. The test program makes me feel like I am watching one of those early space launches where everyone was worried the rocket would explode. Only this time it would be my money exploding! Go PbC Go!
    16 Oct 2012, 11:40 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Bang, It was my theory that some of the extra moneys awarded in the Axion NS999 contract was for services from Axion to assure proper integration and to make sure that the testing of the NS999 had some level of Axion support. That's what I'd do if I had the amount of money NSC has in this program and I failed as miserably as I did with the Odyssey batteries. It would be money well spent.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): through 11:46 ...
    # Trds: 54, MinTrSz: 300, MaxTrSz: 56500, Vol 254008, AvTrSz: 7471
    Min. Pr: 0.3000, Max Pr: 0.3299, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.3104
    # Buys, Shares: 23 103208, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.3174
    # Sells, Shares: 11 150800, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.3056
    # Unkn, Shares: 20 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:1.46 (40.6% "buys").

     

    Note VWAP still above the 50-day ($0.3026), buy:sell recovered nicely from the earlier 10:49 1:2.46.

     

    I wouldn't be surprised, since fearful folks exited earlier, to see us try and move higher again if any additional volume comes back.

     

    ISTM the news of another DOE heavily-subsidized Li-ion battery maker that is Axion competition (from the myopic DOE et al POV) going belly up increases the chances for Axion success.

     

    Why sell in that case? Seems somewhat irrational if you're a stock picker, logical if you just play sectors I guess.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 12:15 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... So much buy/sell these days is basket trading. Welcome to the land of the ETF.
    16 Oct 2012, 12:36 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I don't think there are many baskets that include OTCBB stocks. Most funds are pretty finicky when it comes to sub-$5 stocks that aren't exchange or Nasdaq listed.
    16 Oct 2012, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    This looks like one trade to me where someone sold 138,000 shares:
    $0.3050 56,500 OTO 10:49:03
    $0.3050 19,000 OTO 10:48:54
    $0.3050 7,000 OTO 10:48:42
    $0.3050 19,000 OTO 10:48:39
    $0.3100 20,000 OTO 10:48:21
    $0.3100 10,000 OTO 10:48:11
    $0.3200 5,000 OTO 10:48:05
    $0.3200 1,500 OTO 10:44:16

     

    The divide by two thing is still questionable to me since every time I bought shares it appeared in the level 2 chart in exactly the quantity I bought. If they were sold by someone who bought them at recent low prices and made a average of a nickel a share that would be around a 7K profit less commissions,
    16 Oct 2012, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Patterns are easy to spot when you have a couple big uglies like we've had in Axion for the last two and a half years. Once those guys are out of stock, speculating over whether a series of trades is one retail investor or a several retail investors adds nothing worthwhile to the knowledge base.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    JP, I find it funny that my comment is adding nothing worthwhile, but I agree since I missed HTL's comment and speculation above about the same trade with 5 replies:

     

    "(AXPW): Our little flood of risk-averse folks did 6 trades in less than one minute of 131.5K shares taking pps from $0.32 to $0.305."

     

    I was considering it possible that Indelco was correct when he commented "I sense a shift. We're seeing gamers now having far more impact than the large distressed sellers." I wanted to compute what a gamer could gain. Oh well, I'll shut up now.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I apologize if that came across wrong because I meant no offense.

     

    The point I was trying to make is that sellers are absolutely essential to the normal function of the market and they do so for a world of reasons ranging from investment success or failure to the desire to take the GF to the Bahamas for a weekend.

     

    If the earlier trade was a single seller, the odds are pretty good that he made himself irrelevant with the transaction. Since there's no way to know what his motives were and it's unlikely that he'll have any future impact I don't see how we learn much from focusing on it.

     

    When we had a raft of big uglies I was intensely interested in their selling because their future behavior was likely to affect our future. Now that they're gone, or almost gone, the only thing that interests me is the question "who's buying?" because the future behavior of today's buyers might impact our future if they're buying in big enough blocks.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:03 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    "The point I was trying to make is that sellers are absolutely essential to the normal function of the market " I agree. We need liquidity to glide up smoothly. I appreciate the apology. I felt like I had been swatted with a fly swatter for a while, but I'm am overly sensitive anyway. No worries JP.
    16 Oct 2012, 04:53 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I didn't mean to make you feel slapped, which was the reason for the prompt apology. The important point is that sellers are normal events and motivated by an incredible variety of reasons, so trying to figure them out is almost impossible. Buyers, on the other hand, are only motivated by one reason.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:41 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    I bought 5,000 AXPW @0.30 at 9:31 am today.

     

    I can't help thinking that the only people buying out there are we on this board.
    16 Oct 2012, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    Billa: are you sure? First $0.30 trade today was 2K @ 9:43. No trades went at 9:31 at all.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 02:15 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    EXECUTIONS FOR THIS TRADE
    Date .................Time .............Price ..... Quantity .........Total
    10/16/2012 ... 09:51:01 AM .... $0.30 .... 5,000.000 ..... $1,500.00 NET TOTAL ... 5,000.000 .... $1,500.00

     

    My bad. 9:51:01 am.

     

    I still think we are the only ones buying this.
    16 Oct 2012, 03:59 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    Billa: I *suspect* it's unlikely that active Axionistas are the only buyers. For one thing, we've been buying a long time at higher and lower prices and many (most?) of us should be near full-up unless we are also trading to "compound" our holdings.

     

    Moreover, we are *notorious* bottom-feeders and on any major weakness we let price come to us. Since price has been rising recently, there's *likely* fewer of us doing the feeding here. Many(?) who are not full up have expressed the desire to await a confirmed "break out" before adding and I think they have the discipline to do so.

     

    I add in that noted by others how many "likes" wtb's post about NS-999 got. That says there's likely lots more silent folks that follow and buy and trade than we are aware of.

     

    That's a good thing, IMO, as we need some volume and price movement to make a "good" market.

     

    I can't speak for others, but my last buy was $0.277 for two *small* trading blocks that now sit ensconced on the launching pad awaiting my target price with signs of a pullback so I can compound a little more.

     

    All supposition by me, but that's my feelings.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1286) | Send Message
     
    33 cents. people thinking "we" are doing the selling... maybe that's why the price is grinding up? also, who's doing the buying? if it is us, the price will still grind up 'cause a three cent flip makes less sense the longer you hold.
    16 Oct 2012, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3220) | Send Message
     
    Based on Level II action, the biggest buyers recently have been thru NITE. Poul posted that he bought 100k, and we noticed it was thru them. After him, it gets real muddy. A bunch of other MMs on the bid today, especially in the morning, for example.

     

    The only change I saw on Level II today was that NITE was sometimes on the ask, too. That had almost always been way above it for several days at least.
    16 Oct 2012, 06:47 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    HT:

     

    I added 25k @0.29-0.30 in the last couple of weeks to the 40k @~0.50 I have been holding for about a year.

     

    I want to add another 35k and will buy them on a breakout at >0.37 on massive volume or on a secondary, whichever comes first.

     

    If Axion gets a piece of the SS market or if another one of its target ventures takes off, we will be laughing. But none of this is a sure thing. Only time will tell.
    16 Oct 2012, 06:59 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Billa_from_sf:

     

    Congrats on gettin' some more down under .30c to lower your C.B.!! That means you accumulated some of your shares *below* the level of the Private Placement earlier this year. ;-) And good to see more shares in strong hands. That seems to be the trend since the inflexion point... i.e., shares going to strong hands...

     

    I suspect you will not have to wait too long to get your >0.37 wish... but that's just my opinion...
    16 Oct 2012, 10:23 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    New Axion video...

     

    http://bit.ly/S1Le86
    16 Oct 2012, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    I like the way it spins.

     

    Like Crash Bandicoot.

     

    http://bit.ly/R32cTQ
    16 Oct 2012, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Tim: Nice.

     

    Question: Isn't there a trend developing when Axion makes one of these videos, and then follows up with some sort of announcement?

     

    Drinking the hopium Kool Aide today ;-)
    16 Oct 2012, 02:19 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Tim, was that on their website?
    16 Oct 2012, 02:37 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Tres slick. (That's Franglish for those who were wondering)
    16 Oct 2012, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    OR, no, I am subscribed to the YouTube AxionPowerInt broadcasts...
    16 Oct 2012, 02:41 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    This is when SA's bugs "bug" me! If the other guys hadn't commented I would never have seen it!

     

    Thanks Tim!

     

    And youse udders too for talkin' it up!

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 03:06 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    That's a professionally made video and voice-over. Looks like Axion is upping its PR game. That's super!
    16 Oct 2012, 04:57 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    Vani making moves? Glad to see his tool-belt has another item in it.
    17 Oct 2012, 01:45 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    " http://bit.ly/S1Le86 "

     

    :-) Kind of comes across as merchandising material for a product .
    17 Oct 2012, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • Deamiter
    , contributor
    Comments (165) | Send Message
     
    Only 8 "likes"? Come on guys, I know more than 7 other people have watched this video!
    18 Oct 2012, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Deamiter, You can't like it if you don't have an account.
    18 Oct 2012, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3114) | Send Message
     
    Perhaps not many "likes" because it is boring and is like millions (maybe billions) of other content-light drama-free promotional videos. <yawn>
    18 Oct 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Tim, Thanks. You're just a DD hound of late! ;)

     

    I wish they added just a little on where the tech offers advantage. Which apps. But hey, It's still good.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:18 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    Now if NS would just publish their 2012 sustainability report I will be done for the year and leave the rest to the more talented among us...
    16 Oct 2012, 02:28 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    You'll never be done Tim because us Google addicts are all the same. There's always one more cool search to try.
    16 Oct 2012, 02:40 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    JP, True but the talent here is quite deep so my moments in the sun are few and far between...
    16 Oct 2012, 02:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Here Tim, Since you've been so nice to the board today via your efforts I'll share this video which you can appreciate probably more than anyone here. You'll have sympathy pains for sure. 8-I

     

    http://bit.ly/S1QV6c
    16 Oct 2012, 02:59 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Everybody's moments are momentous because it's the collective effort of dozens of creative minds conducting "just one more search" that gets the extraordinary results we see here.

     

    Lots has been made lately of crowd-sourced information and data gathering. The Concentrators have been practicing Crowd Sourced Due Diligence since 21 July 2011 and it's a wonder to behold.
    16 Oct 2012, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    Amazing indeed! gives me shutters just thinking about it...
    16 Oct 2012, 04:23 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    How can anyone interested in AXPW not know about the APC?
    16 Oct 2012, 04:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    There's a difference between knowing the APC exists and investing enough time to follow it. We've averaged over a hundred comments a day since late September and I don't see any signs of a let-up. That's a lot of reading for somebody who isn't pretty deeply committed.
    16 Oct 2012, 04:30 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    JP, another good point. You better get back to writing articles. Its been a couple days (slacker!) <sarcastic smile>...
    16 Oct 2012, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    I should have known! JP's new article...

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    16 Oct 2012, 05:01 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Can you imagine what this place and the traffic will be like when Axion gets a couple contracts under its belt ...
    16 Oct 2012, 05:19 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (3577) | Send Message
     
    JP,
    That's a lot of reading for someone that is committed (or, maybe I should be committed). ;-)
    16 Oct 2012, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    JP has a good point. When I am usually too busy to spend time obsessively sifting through the APCs I generally tend to read some of my favorite users comment pages (JP, HTL, Maya, INNDeclo, Bang, etc). In a pinch I just read JP's comments and only click through to the comment when I was to see what he is answering (or retorting too).
    16 Oct 2012, 05:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Schism in lead market: U.S. producers eye break from LME

     

    http://bit.ly/TtF5ie
    16 Oct 2012, 02:38 PM Reply Like
  • rgholbrook
    , contributor
    Comments (116) | Send Message
     
    Check out China production and consumption estimates from USGS. Assuming that all stockpiles are already spoken for, they will run out of mined lead in about 8 years. Recycling being the wild card. The good news: global production looks to have a 20-year supply at current rates. However, the graph Indelco was kind enough to share shows the consumption rate escalating. JCI and XIDE could have significant price and supply chain advantages over other battery makers due to their recycling businesses, especially if they have buy-back agreements with their resellers.
    FWIW - The USGS site is full of interesting articles.
    http://bit.ly/TtOrKK
    P.S. - USGS is not the US Geological Service
    16 Oct 2012, 04:50 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    rgholbrook, In about 15-20 years the US will be mining its old landfills. For two reasons. To recycles the metal content and to try to fix the water table problems that will come as a result of bad decisions. Of coarse doing the right thing years later is far more expensive.

     

    Thanks for the link!
    16 Oct 2012, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Every year the USGS puts out a two page report on global production and consumption of minerals. Their lead report is here.

     

    http://on.doi.gov/x6Am9R

     

    One of the more interesting paragraphs in the lead report, which I've never seen in reports for other metals, says:

     

    "World Resources: In recent years, significant lead resources have been demonstrated in association with zinc and/or silver or copper deposits in Australia, China, Ireland, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Russia, and the United States (Alaska). Identified lead resources of the world total more than 1.5 billion tons."

     

    That 1.5 billion tons of known resources equals about 20x current "reserves," so there's no real risk that we're going to run out of lead anytime soon. It is, after all, a single use commodity.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:49 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Sure wish someone made a lead based battery with less lead in it.

     

    Try a 10 year chart at the LME.

     

    http://bit.ly/TtIEEZ
    16 Oct 2012, 03:29 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Applying Elliot Wave Theory to that chart says it is on the first leg up of a long journey, I think.
    16 Oct 2012, 06:00 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    I think there is some obscure company in New Castle that makes something like that, but I can't remember the name....
    16 Oct 2012, 06:11 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Interesting chart. Thanks, iindelco.
    16 Oct 2012, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, When you tie in the message being made in the prior article I posted, which also ties in well with what John and Jack Lifton have been telling us for some time, well it's just another data point in support of a technology that from a resource utilization point of view makes sense. Yes it costs more because of process but from where I evolved that's called opportunity.
    16 Oct 2012, 04:53 PM Reply Like
  • Lafferty
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    IIndelco: I'm confused about this point, because of the apparent need for the two battery solution. Isn't more overall lead needed to support the Axion dual battery approach?
    16 Oct 2012, 11:16 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Good point, Lafferty. What is the combined weight of lead used in both a PbC and a cranking battery?
    16 Oct 2012, 11:46 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Lead is a funny metal because the recycling rates are so very high. The latest USGS report says that the US consumed 1,500 tons of lead last year, but fully 80% of lead supplies came from recycling.

     

    http://on.doi.gov/x6Am9R

     

    At the end of the day, people don't so much consume lead as rent it.
    16 Oct 2012, 11:53 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Lafferty, Good point.

     

    I'll be interested to see what the eventual size would be for the flooded/PbC combination.
    17 Oct 2012, 09:57 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "Isn't more overall lead needed to support the Axion dual battery approach? "

     

    Excellent point on automotive market demands. Lead conservation would still apply though to PbC applications in stationary energy storage markets. Rail locomotive applications of the PbC are apparently incremental new demand for lead.
    17 Oct 2012, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3220) | Send Message
     
    HTL and JP, the FINRA short for today was (only) 26,508 shares.
    16 Oct 2012, 05:36 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    MR I,
    Thats pretty small for the volume isn't it?
    16 Oct 2012, 06:01 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3220) | Send Message
     
    Futurist---yes.
    16 Oct 2012, 06:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    MrI: Yes, 8.56% of today's volume. recent prior days had
    31.0K, 13.9%
    41.5K, 13.1%
    30.1K, 07.6%
    43.9K, 17.7%
    34.2K, 14.3%
    70.8K, 18.9%

     

    Good to see normal up and down. Looking at my experimental charts, this seems to carry on the normal pattern after spikes in shorts. I'm wondering if the percentage will move substantially up tomorrow. Looks like that's a common occurrence after several days of low percentage.

     

    I wonder if the fact it's quite near to 1/11th of days volume, ~28,140 has any significance today.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Oct 2012, 06:19 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3220) | Send Message
     
    HTL---only if Q still has some shares, and I believe they only would if they ran into the rolling cap on how many they could sell on a given day this round (given the high total volume there has been on some days), like they prob did last round, per JP's calc's.
    16 Oct 2012, 06:36 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Where is Quercus these days?
    16 Oct 2012, 06:12 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    Presumably out of stock....
    16 Oct 2012, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Load shedding on the not so smart grid.

     

    Time for some batteries and a grid hook-up or with solar. In many areas, from what I've read, a solar/battery/lamp option makes far more economic sense. A long life battery that can better handle the temperature extremes. Hmmmmm...

     

    Traffic police groping in the dark

     

    http://bit.ly/PAFFzk
    16 Oct 2012, 06:23 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    German winter shows Achilles heel of renewables: Wynn

     

    http://reut.rs/OGaK34
    16 Oct 2012, 08:22 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco,

     

    Why is it that those who have followed the logic of energy supply, energy demand, and intermittent energy supply simply don't understand why everyone else in the world does not understand.

     

    Creating intermittent energy does not equally substitute for a necessary steady energy supply.

     

    Now ,if that energy would be stored and distributed in a steady manner, things would be different. If you could store and distribute that intermittent energy then you could help the situation. If you can accept the energy quickly and then return it quickly, if needed, then you could help smooth the grid. If a storage device could do that often, for years and years, and do it cheap enough, well then AXPW would be in hog heaven wouldn't it.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:01 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    I recall JP posted a link some time ago about the literal mountain of lead it would take to make a dent in grid storage demands posed by large scale intermittent sources.

     

    Even PbC will have to perform as a niche, localized, behind-the-meter backup source as it is being commercialized with the Hub and PowerCube.

     

    Although it will be great for us Axionistas, it's a shame to think that a less reliable grid born of magical Green thinking will be the ultimate source of our wealth.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:48 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Lux just came out with a new report on dealing with intermittency. The most shocking paragraph in the report says:

     

    "Storage sounds like a small piece of the pie, but its potential represents dramatic growth. At 30% renewables penetration, over the course of a year, only around 0.5% of electricity generation capacity will require storage. Yet in 2009, over 20,132,212 GWh of electricity was produced globally, indicating a market potential of over 100,000 GWh for storage from the 1,482 MWh currently installed if and when renewable generation around the world approaches 30%. Furthermore, when evaluated at the daily level, storage during the average day in March in Scenario 4 requires 1.9% of the electricity consumed to be stored and discharged over 5.2 hours, representing 5.2% of the generation capacity. Storage systems used for renewables integration will likely be sized to optimally take advantage of numerous value streams available in a given region, with the renewable integration representing a portion of its daily use. Nonetheless, to minimize renewables curtailment, utilities will need to size storage for the worst day predicted by supply and demand profiles to effectively mitigate intermittency. Sizing grid storage projects for this purpose will increase the potential market size by nearly a factor of four."

     

    I'm currently working my way through the report and spending a lot of time considering the implications. A hundred thousand GWh of storage at a billion dollars per GWh is absurd beyond reckoning and numbers of that magnitude will only be necessary if your primary goal is to maximize renewables on the grid and minimize renewable curtailment. At the end of the day I think the decision may well be "screw the renewables."
    17 Oct 2012, 12:08 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    And before I thought "intermittency" was only a problem suffered by old men with enlarged prostates.

     

    Now I learn it is the curse of those monuments to Gaia that dot the landscape.

     

    Screw 'em may be wishful thinking for those who suffer intermittency. They are going to need some serious CarboCap medicine.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:25 AM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    I suspect uranium miners will also benefit from the realization of the magnitude of the problems with intermittent power and the need for cheap stable supply. Europe still imports most of its gas so nuclear (and coal) are the only alternatives.

     

    Fukushima has devastated uranium prices and curtailed new E&P. The ultimate consequence will be higher U prices over the next few years with the end of the Megatons to Megawatts program to decommission Russian warheads which will end December 2013
    17 Oct 2012, 01:07 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    The more I think about "renewables penetration" the more I am reminded of this old David Allan Coe ditty.

     

    http://bit.ly/WlmfAi
    17 Oct 2012, 01:17 AM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1286) | Send Message
     
    any of you familiar with uranium miners? any rare metals streamers ?
    17 Oct 2012, 02:12 AM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    Mathieu,

     

    My favorites are Paladin (PDN on the ASX) and produce out of Africa with holdings in Australia and Canada. Prime Minister Gilard is at this moment talking uranium sales to India and PDN already has received the first $50 million of $200M from a utility for a guaranteed supply.

     

    Ur-Energy (URG in the US). URG is a very low cost almost-producer in Wyoming and has just received all approvals for in situ production with first production scheduled for mid 2013.
    17 Oct 2012, 02:28 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Mathieu: I've been in and out of Denison Mines (DNN) several times. Hold a small position on the gamer board for tracking purposes.

     

    Here's some other unranium miners. DD on any of these stocks suggested:

     

    http://bit.ly/WlA3uu
    17 Oct 2012, 02:32 AM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1286) | Send Message
     
    thank you both! something to keep me busy while the wife is out of town.
    17 Oct 2012, 02:34 AM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    My educated guess is that uranium price recovery won't occur until well after the M2M program ends. CCJ is the safest choice as it is by far the largest. Guessing when the U drought will end is clearly a crapshoot. My investments are intended to be long-term (2-5y)
    17 Oct 2012, 02:47 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (3577) | Send Message
     
    MM.
    Check with Tripleblack and Mercy Jimenez.
    17 Oct 2012, 02:49 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4073) | Send Message
     
    For utterly speculative uranium plays check

     

    European Uranium Resources (TVCFD), formerly Tournigan Uranium. http://www.tournigan.com

     

    Virginia Energy Resources (VUI in Canada, possibly renamed Anthem Resources as VAERD in the US) http://bit.ly/V6p17r

     

    Also... Michael Fillon did a 3 part series on uranium last year on Seeking Alpha... parts 1 & 2 covered bigger players and part 3 covered more speculative options... those articles plus the comments below them should give you a few more ideas
    17 Oct 2012, 06:15 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    The closest thing to a REE streamer is Dacha (DCHAF), but it is NOT a true streamer, and I don't recommend it. It squirrels away high purity metals for later sale at higher prices, but I doubt the abilities of its management...

     

    URRE is worth a look for those who like to invest in small caps with longer horizons.

     

    There is an ETF focused on REEs and strategic minerals, REMX. I prefer individual stocks myself, however. Review the list of stocks they are investing in carefully, and note the number which are middle men and brokers rather than true miners/producers. The ETF focuses only on companies with market caps of sufficient size, which in the REE space means only a small handful of companies like Lynas, MCP, etc.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:41 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    Personally, I'm looking to thorium as the future of nuclear. I'm aware of the drawbacks (the best one is that it doesn't make a weapon), but it is more abundant than Uranium. Think it would be good for the REE miners also.
    17 Oct 2012, 09:32 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Futurist, All true.

     

    But another way to look at it is via the "negawatts" view. If you treat the loads as necessary (your wording) or variable within limits you can also solve a significant level of the issue of how to handle the variable generation. Things like home heating/cooling and electric ranges don't have to be on consistently. Things like puters and other electronics do. So if you can separate these on the grid and get control over the lower priority load you can do great things. Perhaps at a far lower cost than with certain types of every storage.........within limits of coarse. Still need storage but "hog heaven" becomes easier to attain.

     

    All tools, apply the right ones at the correct time and you end up with great things. Choose wisely Grasshopper!
    17 Oct 2012, 10:18 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Here is an elegant "renewables" idea that would not suffer from intermittency. Turbines harnessing steady deep ocean currents.

     

    http://bit.ly/U3T7g0

     

    I hope they can make it work and make it cost effective without huge govt subsidy.
    17 Oct 2012, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    That is extraordinarily cool, particularly the stability aspects.
    17 Oct 2012, 10:24 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    It's in the tidal flow and bouys category.
    17 Oct 2012, 10:39 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "A hundred thousand GWh of storage at a billion dollars per GWh is absurd beyond reckoning and numbers of that magnitude will only be necessary if your primary goal is to maximize renewables on the grid and minimize renewable curtailment. At the end of the day I think the decision may well be 'screw the renewables.'"

     

    Thanks for addressing the Lux estimates, JP. The thrust and tone of your evaluation will be shared with my local politicians (Maryland) in an effort to constrain extent of ongoing economic foibles.
    17 Oct 2012, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I'll have a more detailed article on this whole issue for TheStreet in the next couple days.
    17 Oct 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Excellent news John.

     

    This whole area of renewable energy storage and the difficulties it brings to the grid is fascinating. Germany has already achieved 25% renewable energy production. They are quickly coming to grips with the "intermittent problem" as well as the tiny issue that it has caused electricity rates to go sky high for all citizens.
    17 Oct 2012, 11:57 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I think a lot of wind and solar people may hate me by this time next week.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (869) | Send Message
     
    By product of GWMGF's South Africa REE mine I believe.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Renewagelicals?
    17 Oct 2012, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    AlbertinBermuda: Correct, Great Western's Steenkampskraal is perhaps the richest deposit of rare earths and thorium on earth. They will be storing thorium in concrete blocks there as they bring the mine back into production. This is also going to be a very early (if not first mover, and I believe it may meet that goal as well) ex-China source for critical/heavy rare earths once its new processing plant is built.
    17 Oct 2012, 01:26 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    DR, I suspect you're already familiar with Lightbridge (LTBR) which was originally named Thorium Power. Thorium-uranium fuel assemblies are on their agenda, although it's not the major thrust with their all-metal (uranium) fuel design for PWR power uprates. I wrote an article about them here (http://bit.ly/Tv1qMj) for a competition (and won a silver dollar!!!).

     

    LFTR liquid reactors are a long way off but I would be optimistic a new administration might invest in the basic research needed to get the ball rolling.
    17 Oct 2012, 02:30 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    Renzo: (LTBR) is one I've been tracking for a *long* time. TG haven't jumped on it yet, but I expect to one of these days ... some distance out still I think.

     

    HardToLove
    17 Oct 2012, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, unfortunately I jumped on it long ago. But just a few more years, right. ;-)
    17 Oct 2012, 02:43 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2730) | Send Message
     
    I've been reading about this energy source for decades, off and on. It shows up every time petroleum and/or natgas prices spike.

     

    But maybe now is the time. Carbon and glass composites have finally matured and just may be the substitute for expensive, corrosion resistant metal alloys previously needed for long equipment life in salt water.

     

    In a previous ocean current generation interest cycle, someone proposed a long loop of cable with devices that looked like parachutes attached. They acted as current catchers when going with the current and folded up into long, thin bundles while on the return loop. The cable wound around a drum to transfer the linear force to rotation for driving a generator. I never heard of a prototype being constructed but it sounded like a "lower" cost approach if some obvious problems could be worked out.

     

    Geeze, these engineers will think of just ANYTHING! :-)
    May they keep at it.
    19 Oct 2012, 01:45 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Wondering if the Fisker board of directors are quivering like a broken-winged quail at gun point about what JCI will charge for X-AONE's lithium batteries.

     

    Most certainly, JCI will not be taking a loss on every battery sold to Fisker. Guessing the price of a new Karma just went up by $1000s.

     

    Also guessing Fisker is the next green investment boondoggle for the current administration.

     

    Here's a fairly comprehensive list of this administration's green investment failures pasted in from a commenter about this AONE article (I'm not so keen on all the editorializing, but this list is a pretty good one, as good as I have seen):

     

    http://nbcnews.to/R3z66O

     

    List Of Failed Green Energy Jobs & Companies – By Obama
    Update: 7/19/12:

     

    The Amonix Solar: FAIL! – manufacturing plant in North Las Vegas, subsidized by more than $20 million in federal tax credits and grants given by Obama Administration, has closed its 214,000 square foot facility a year after it opened.

     

    Solar Trust of America: FAIL! - Filed Bankruptcy in Oakland, CA, April 3, 2012

     

    Bright Source: FAIL! - Bright Source warned Obama’s Energy Department officials in March 2011 that delays in approving a $1.6 billion U.S. loan guarantee would embarrass the White House and force the solar-energy company to close. Bright Source lost billions of dollars but is getting more money to keep trying. Can you say, “This isn’t working Mr. President?”

     

    Solyndra: FAIL! - Obama gave $500,000,000 (that’s a HALF BILLION!) in taxpayer money to Solyndra who shut its doors and laid off 1100 workers in August 2011 after billions in losses due to failure to make a solar product that works! Barack Obama was not vetted before being elected President and neither was Solyndra before Mr. Obama threw that taxpayer money down the drain of unproven technology.

     

    LSP Energy: FAIL! - LSPEnergy LP filed bankruptcy protection and a sale of its assets in Feb 2012

     

    Energy Conversion Devices: FAIL! – On February 14, 2012 Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. and its subsidiaries filed for bankruptcy

     

    Abound Solar: FAIL! - Abound Solar received a $400 million loan guarantee from Barack Obama then announced in June, 2012 that it would file for bankruptcy. Many of these failed corporations, such as Abound, donated MILLIONS and continue to donate to Barack Obama’s campaign. Can you say, “Democrat Slush Fund”? Yes this is illegal. But Democrats are being protected from being prosecuted, for now.

     

    SunPower: FAIL! - SunPower stopped producing solar cells in 2011 at near bankruptcy then restructured with the help of, get this, oil giant TOTAL, Inc. who owns 60% stake in SunPower. Irony? The company is still struggling.

     

    Beacon Power: FAIL! – Beacon Power Corp filed for bankruptcy protection in October, 2011 just a year after Obama approved a $43 million Government loan guarantee. They remain barely in business, still struggling to make energy that makes sense or that works at all.

     

    Ecotality: FAIL! - ECOtality, a San Francisco green-tech company that never earned any money and remains on the verge of bankruptcy after receiving roughly $115 million in two loan guarantees from President Obama, who wants to do some more of this kind of Democrat Slush Fund Guarantees after he is elected to a 2nd term.

     

    A123 Solar: FAIL! - A123 Solar received $279 million from taxpayers thanks to President Obama’s Department of Energy loan guarantees even after the Solyndra bankruptcy and is getting another $500M from Obama after a loss of $400M.

     

    UniSolar: FAIL! - Uni-Solar filed for Ch 11 bankruptcy in June 20, 2012 after laying off hundreds of workers. UniSolar received even more Obama money after showing now progress, no profits and is still failing… yet they still remain in business with Obama’s help.

     

    Azure Dynamics: FAIL! - Azure Dynamics filed for bankruptcy in June , 2012 wasting millions in Obama “Stimulus” money and received abatement on taxes owed and and several tax credits. Azure Dynamics LLC filed for bankruptcy protection in Canada and the US. Azure laid off 120 of its 160 employees in Oak Park; Boston; Vancouver, British Columbia; and the UK.

     

    Evergreen Solar: FAIL! - Evergreen Solar received $527 Million in Taxpayer money from Obama and filed bankruptcy in late 2011. Evergreen, which closed its taxpayer-supported Devens factory in March, 2011 cut more than 1800 jobs. Evergreen’s $450 million factory, turned out to be a colossal “waste” of taxpayer money.

     

    Ener1: FAIL! Ener1 Inc. received a $118 million U.S. Energy Department grant from President Obama to make electric-car batteries but filed for bankruptcy protection January 2012 after defaulting on bond debt.
    16 Oct 2012, 09:38 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    .... so what are you getting at, Maya?
    16 Oct 2012, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • User462699
    , contributor
    Comments (120) | Send Message
     
    Any chance at all of keeping politics out of this forum?
    16 Oct 2012, 11:27 PM Reply Like
  • Lafferty
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    User462699: But do note that Maya said, "I'm not so keen on all the editorializing."
    17 Oct 2012, 12:01 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    User462699: That's why I wasn't so keen on the editorializing. But as to date, I've never before seen such a detailed "fail" list of green government subsidized technology, and near every one of that list either would have been a potential Axion user of PbC technology, or would have been creating electricity that somehow needed to be stored, or a competitor.

     

    Pretty sure whatever party comes next, batteries, all kinds and types of batteries, for all kinds and types of applications, will be part of both policy and investment.

     

    Guess I should have written above the disclaimer: "This list is obviously created by a right-winger, and I'm not sure I agree with all the editorializing by this commenter, especially because he/she blames every choice by the DOE or DOD as to what company deserves or not a grant from the Obama administration."

     

    The above list still remains as the best "accounting" list I've seen of failed government investments in green technology.

     

    I wish I could obtain an even more detailed list of failed energy related investments by the DOD and DOE, with just the details...and no political slant.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:09 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >User462699 ... Not likely. Economics is politics. Business is politics. Though you'll not hear from my side very often.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:26 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Given the wide diversity of views in this group I think we do a fine job of keeping politics out of the conversation.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:47 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    No company names but a decent macro overview of federal energy storage subsidies 2009 - 2012. http://bit.ly/U597OQ

     

    Total of $1.3 billion in direct expenditures with a further $596 million of DOE-supported direct loans. Article includes a table on storage initiatives by type of storage.
    17 Oct 2012, 03:03 PM Reply Like
  • Johhny rambo
    , contributor
    Comments (127) | Send Message
     
    Fairly depressing to see that list, and the many many millions wasted on blue sky companies.
    Clearly this is why we need 1. Financing, asap 2. Orders 3. Ramped up IR from Allen and Caron 4. Locomotive strategy unveiled, and proven

     

    I think we need all of above, lest we could also become JCI fodder 1
    17 Oct 2012, 04:19 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    JR: With no debt, it would be difficult to achieve that goal.

     

    But, you knew that already, having been so long in the stock.

     

    HardToLove
    17 Oct 2012, 04:21 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    You can't become JCI fodder without debt and that's the one thing Axion has scrupulously avoided since day one. As long as you don't owe money, you control your own destiny even when times get tight.
    17 Oct 2012, 04:23 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    JR,
    I find it interesting that you have a hard time being a little patient, but to each his own. Last year the need to purchase higher amounts of carbon for electrodes was unnecessary. Now it is essential.

     

    Should give you hope.
    17 Oct 2012, 04:37 PM Reply Like
  • Johhny rambo
    , contributor
    Comments (127) | Send Message
     
    Good point
    No debt is a big advantage for sure
    Just to reiterate previous commentary I hope that we are getting close to "exiting the valley of death now the Elephant hunters have got their fill, and we have survived this long"
    17 Oct 2012, 07:39 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Johny Rambo: were you able to add to your position on the dip?
    17 Oct 2012, 10:24 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It's all up to the battery at this point and the things the battery has accomplished over the last three years are pretty impressive.
    17 Oct 2012, 11:17 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/OGs0VN

     

    Thought this was an interesting short video on BMW start/stop.
    16 Oct 2012, 10:49 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Another good one from Ford.

     

    http://bit.ly/QpaUrO
    16 Oct 2012, 11:21 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Stephan: I love those brainwashing videos. Both BMW and Ford are preempting, training future customers that the stop-start, fuel savings feature will only "sometimes" work.

     

    "It's okay! Cope with it!" seems the theme. "Relax...when this becomes a nuisance, with a mere press of a button everytime you start your car, you can overide the entire fuel savings feature."

     

    Looking forward to future videos that show the consumer how to deal with the stop-start feature never working.
    17 Oct 2012, 02:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The automakers have already decided that they're going to implement stop-start, whether the customer wants it or not. They're using the technology as a regulatory compliance tool. Now they have to convince consumers that it's a valuable benefit instead of a costly hassle.

     

    I fully expect stop-start to be greeted by intense push-back from the same class of customers who complained about seat belts, pollution control systems, catalytic converters etc. In time consumers will lighten up about another technology being forced down their throats and eventually they'll worry about the systems not working right, but that should leave plenty of time to scale the PbC.
    17 Oct 2012, 03:19 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    I read your last article (and all others), my conclusion is this:
    The "only Lead-Acid" battery that meets the requirements of the cars equipped with new and upcoming technologies is AGM-PbC and Litium Ion batteries.
    With all due respect: all other Lead-Acid batteries do not meet the requirements, do not think that the auto-makers equip their cars with devices that are going to cause problems.
    Have a good day-Carlos.
    17 Oct 2012, 07:18 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    Sorry, today I woke up with pessimism excited:
    The Lead-Acid batteries must incorporate PbC-Technology if they are to survive in the future or they will be sentenced to death.
    Carlos.

     

    Note: All for an article I read yesterday!!!! and and bankruptcy happened in the North.
    17 Oct 2012, 07:34 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    Ford needs to put a new battery in their "donkey".
    17 Oct 2012, 08:40 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Yep. That donkey needs a CarboCap carrot to go with the EPA stick.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:57 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    I noticed that, but I am happy to see the marketing push towards S/S increasing in intensity. IMO, it confirms the idea that S/S will become standard equipment and when there is a battery (PbC) that is cheap enough and available at relevant scale ... the "sometimes" hopefully slide into obscurity.
    17 Oct 2012, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    A friend sent me a link to this guy's photography:

     

    http://bit.ly/RAKFj0

     

    It's an enormous body of work, but if you have time to skim through some of it, you can see the impact of global industry on the environment in dramatic detail.
    17 Oct 2012, 02:31 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    10/16/2012: (AXPW) EOD stuff partially copied from instablog.
    # Trds: 50, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 56500, Vol 309537, AvTrSz: 6191
    Min. Pr: 0.3000, Max Pr: 0.3300, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.3111
    # Buys, Shares: 37 154437, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.3163
    # Sells, Shares: 13 155100, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.3058
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:1.004 (49.9% “buys” rounding error), DlyShts 26508 (8.6%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 17.09%

     

    Daily short sales continue their typical bounce along at low percentage after a big spike (10/3-10/5) and we should see a move up begin shortly.

     

    There was apparently some effect on price when the (AONE) bankruptcy became common knowledge as I posted in a comment at 11:32: “Our little flood of risk-averse folks did 6 trades in less than one minute of 131.5K shares taking pps from $0.32 to $0.305”. This was from 10:48:11 to 10:49:03. But we still looked pretty good at 11:46 IMO, seen here http://seekingalpha.co... and we did end up finishing near the high, closing at $0.3299 with a push up in the last few minutes. Volume during the push could have been better, but let's not look a gift-horse in the mouth, shall we not?

     

    We did have a slight dip in volume on an up day and we're still riding predominately above the 50-day SMA, which is just a few days from starting to rise if we stay around or above this price area, as some older lower prices begin to fall out of scope.

     

    All the traditional oscillators, except ADX and related, have moved into bullish stances now and, I'm finally pleased to say, we have finally closed above the falling former resistance (~$0.318?) of our descending trading channel. We've been trying to get away from that for six days. If we confirm it with a small rise in volume and close above again tomorrow, that's a positive.

     

    On my experimental charts, the intra-day high has been above the falling 100-day SMA for seven straight days. The VWAP 10-day average has crossed above both the 25 and 50-day SMAs.

     

    On my new inflection point calculations, the 5 and 10-day points are a bit weaker, but not to a degree worth trying to assign any change in what's being indicated.

     

    The "Dly Sht % of 'sells'" is omitted from the concentrator.

     

    HardToLove
    17 Oct 2012, 08:12 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    FWIW, I expect daily short sales to remain low or decline further, but that all goes back to my debate with HTL about what the FINRA short data means.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:31 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    Thought the last four trades yesterday taking price from .3097 to .3299 were a little unusual, as they took price up .02 at end of day. Seemed like they were plays by the MM. Would be happy if that end of the day activity was in reality demand chasing supply.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:34 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    IN APC #163 I posted this comment:

     

    I think we may be seeing the street sweepers at work. I'm getting a vague sense of deja vu from the early 90s when a market consultant for WRT Energy talked about the "street sweepers" being out cleaning up the last few sloppy shares.

     

    IIRC the strategy is to let the stock wallow all day to shake loose any shares that may be nervous or sitting on the edge, and then come in during the last hour and buy all the sloppy orders that accumulated during the day. This guy was an old line market pro who's long since retired, but he actually managed the process instead of just observing it. Still, it feels like I've trod this path before to a happy ending.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19450) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Determined to not let another *potential* "stealth rally" to slip by me, I noticed the average trade sizes have been *trending up on my experimental charts since ~10/3 or so. Combined with the buy:sell 10-day SMA having bumped back into 50%+ range, ritght there with the 100-day SMA and my nw 5, 10, 50 and 100-day inflection point calculations all above 0 (only the 25 is below and it is rising) ...

     

    We might be seeing along-term trend in progress.

     

    Short-term up and down will, of course, occur, but this is looking good when combined with recent price action since 10/1.

     

    Let's hope I've got something useful telling the truth here.

     

    HardToLove
    17 Oct 2012, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    I'm curious to see the opening today to see how the .3299 stands up.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:44 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    I predict it gaps down...

     

    Just a guess, however.
    17 Oct 2012, 08:51 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    With my new article hitting after the market closed last night, we may not get much useful information from today's open.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    17 Oct 2012, 08:51 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    TB,

     

    I suspect there are some hungry detritivores with Axionista brooms waiting for just that.

     

    I am hoping for one more bite below .30 to lower my average.
    17 Oct 2012, 09:01 AM Reply Like