Axion Power Host's  Instablog

Axion Power Host
Send Message
Trying to learn stuff
  • Axion Power Concentrator 166: Oct. 20, 2012: Mr. Investor Prods Viridity Energy, NS-999 Lives, 13th ELBC: Axion's "Operational Stability Of PbC Batteries And Battery Systems" 184 comments
    Oct 30, 2012 9:11 AM | about stocks: AXPW

    On 10/18, our own Mr Investor posted the results of a communication with Viridity Energy that was good news confirming that the FERC Order 755 implementation by PJM had occurred and resulted in an update to Viridity's web site. It essentially confirms Tom Granville's statement that pay for performance would see substantial increases, which should make the Power Cube even more attractive to prospective customers. It's worth reading the thread following Mr. Investors comment as some reviews of prior Axion conference calls regarding the percentage increases refresh the information we had in hand.

    Big news 10/16 was wtblanchards comment noting NS-999 had been moved into the shop and a lot of enthusiastic commentary followed. Pascquale got a short secondary thread started with a comment citing the Altoona Works facebook page ... and then we hear it's back out of the shop. It's noted that the number of "likes" on these comments suggest a lot of silent followers inhabit this blog.

    John Petersen's participation as a presenter at the 13th European Lead Battery Conference, ELBC, has provided additional benefits: he has posted, a brief instablog that identifies slides with information and data he'd not seen before and considers important in Axion's presentation, "Axion PbC Lead-Carbon Hybrid Battery/Supercapacitor ,Operational Stability of PbC Batteries and Battery Systems", to which he has provided a link.

    John did a bang-up job on his presentation, in our opinion, and has graciously permitted us to link to a SlideRocket Version of his presentation. It is highly recommended that you take the time, around 20 minutes, to view this if you've not seen it. It is not focused on Axion, but presents some opportunities and challenges facing the LA battery industry at-large.

    Our very own (claiming him without asking!) Brishwain was able to attend some presentations and talk to some knowledgeable folks, including John Petersen and Enders Dickenson, Director of Research and Development at Axion Power. Brishwain's observations can be found in his comment section, but at this time these are particularly relevant.
    - "... many auto OEMs ... looking at going the two-battery route ..."
    - the Ford rep "... whole presentation essentially showing how pathetic the SS performance was ..." when discussing the current battery use.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Concentrator 154 was headed up by APMarshall's Sep 2012 CEDIA Notes (discussing the Rosewater Residential Hub product), which are worth reviewing if you've not seen them before.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    John Petersen has provided price and volume charts updated through 10/19/2012. A new APC activity chart is also provided.

    (click to enlarge)AXPW Weighted Moving Average Prices 20121019

    (click to enlarge)AXPW Moving Average Volume 20121019

    (click to enlarge)APC Concentrator Comments 20121019

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Links to valuable Axion Power research and websites:

    The Axion Power Concentrator Web Sites, created by APC commentator Bangwhiz. It is a complete easy-to-use online archive of all the information contained in the entire Axion Power Concentrator series from day one, including reports, articles, comments and posted links.

    Axion Power Wikispaces Web Site, created by APC commentator WDD. It is an excellent ongoing notebook aggregation of Axion Power facts.

    Axion Power Website. The first place any prospective investor should go and thoroughly explore with all SEC filings and investor presentations as well as past and present Press Releases.

    Axion Power Intra-day Statistics. HTL tracks and charts AXPW's intra-day statistics.

    Testing Summary Statistics On Stocks. FocalPoint Analytics has begun an instablog that will apply statistical disciplines to metrics of stock activity to produce summary indications of likely actions going forward. Well worth a visit.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Be sure and either follow the Axion Power Host ID on Seeking Alpha or click the check-box labeled "track new comments on this article" just ahead of the comments section!
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    WARNING: This is a troll free zone. We reserve the right to eliminate posts, or posters that are disruptive.

    Enjoy!

    Disclosure: I am long AXPW.

    Stocks: AXPW
Back To Axion Power Host's Instablog HomePage »

Instablogs are blogs which are instantly set up and networked within the Seeking Alpha community. Instablog posts are not selected, edited or screened by Seeking Alpha editors, in contrast to contributors' articles.

Comments (184)
Track new comments
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    Hmmm.........
    19 Oct 2012, 07:06 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Good bell cow award, Dastar!

     

    ####

     

    33,000 APC comments boggles my mind.

     

    ####

     

    APH: Thanks providing links and writing about our own "Market Currents."
    19 Oct 2012, 07:09 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    I look forward to the next 33,000,000.
    19 Oct 2012, 07:17 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    Ok. Let me get this going.

     

    Anyone want to guess/speculate as to who Axion might be in discussions with in regards to a strategic partnership?
    19 Oct 2012, 09:16 PM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2744) | Send Message
     
    I'm guessing BMW would be more than happy to fund Axion once 3rd party testing is complete.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:17 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    I haven't a clue but I do know that if BMW or some other well healed auto company say's here is our need for this future model in this time frame TG will not have a problem getting the next round of financing. I don't think the auto companies will really be interested in owning Axion directly. Sharing just one layer of their plans and having Axion in mind would be more than good enough.

     

    But they are quiet and it's for a reason. Doesn't make it easy on the Axion's of the world. But they don't worry about making it easier. For automotive it's hard getting in and you'll wonder why you wanted in once you're invited.
    20 Oct 2012, 08:43 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Wouldn't it be nice to build batteries for the railroads and simply sell electrode assemblies to companies like JCI and Exide who wants to make batteries for automotive?
    20 Oct 2012, 08:57 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    John, Let me get your perspective on one point.

     

    Let us imagine that an auto concern has decided they want PbC batteries for an application or more. They finish testing and state their intentions to Axion but they want the batteries from an existing tier 1 supplier in automotive. Ignoring the complexity of the three party negotiations, Do you think Axion would have a problem licensing PbC carbon sheeting/electrode assembly to a concern like Exide, JCI or East Penn as examples?

     

    I realize you don't have full access to give me an assured yes or no answer but directionally what are your feelings on this?
    20 Oct 2012, 09:52 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I think an outright license would be tough because management has been so careful to protect the core technology. On the other hand I could easily see a situation where an automaker wants PbC batteries but has a 20 year history of buying batteries from X. If the automaker is clear with both parties, it would be relatively simple to craft an agreement that says.

     

    Axion and X will form a joint venture to build and operate a PbC electrode plant next to X's battery plant in Anyburg, Germany. Construction costs would be shared in agreed ratios, although X would probably pay an outsized share of those costs.

     

    Upon completion of construction, Axion would give the facility the right to manufacture a predetermined number of electrode assemblies per year for sale to X and maybe other battery manufacturers in the Anyburg region.

     

    Day to day manufacturing activities of the joint venture would be managed by employees of X. Day to day technology activities of the joint venture would be managed by Axion.

     

    Profits and losses of the joint venture would be shared in pre-agreed ratios, probably with a minimum per electrode payment to Axion. If, but only if, something bad happened to Axion, the facility would get a permanent license to manufacture a specified number of assemblies per year in return for a royalty.
    20 Oct 2012, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "For automotive it's hard getting in and you'll wonder why you wanted in once you're invited. "

     

    :-) Be careful of what one wishes for, eh.
    20 Oct 2012, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    "Day to day manufacturing activities of the joint venture would be managed by employees of X. Day to day technology activities of the joint venture would be managed by Axion."

     

    So in this area would the "partner" have full control/understanding of the current process/technology? If not here is where I could see some hesitation on the part of the partner. After all what the partner would be bringing to the partnership, as the tier 1 supplier, would be in the area of risk reduction for the automaker. The financial backing that gives them enough risk to make sure that the automaker knows that any mishaps would most likely be prevented but should they happen they would be covered. And in light of that the tier one supplier wants to make sure that they have full access at all levels to manage the risks.

     

    One other point. The tier 1 supplier, having it's financial & technical depth would most probably have just as much if not more ability to bring the PBC technology closer to technical & manufacturing maturation which would be in the interests of all parties. So,in my mind, having Axion involved in something less than a full development & manufacturing partnership would also have certain pitfalls.

     

    Yes, I do understand the other risk you are relaying and it's real for sure. But so is not having access to capital at certain stages.

     

    Could you envision this level of partnership with the right entity? Again, I realize it's your opinion and it would really fall on TG and his team.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:26 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Once people decide they want to do business together, they usually find ways to reasonably satisfy each other's needs. In those situations, Axion should benefit significantly from having a former management side national labor contract negotiator in its corner.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Touche.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    So I've been wanting to pose this question, and this seems a good time, considering the discussion.
    So TG has said there is a new top five Asian automaker looking at Axion. We all immediately assumed Hundai, but let's just have fun for a moment and assume it's Toyota. So my first question is, from whom does Toyota get its LA batteries? With all the talk out of Toyota lately about putting EVs on the back burner for now, but coming out with hybrids on most if not all their current models, one could assume some of those are going to be micro-mild hybrids where the PbC would make sense. Kurray, the company that Axion gets its activated carbon from, is located in Japan, so if Axion built an electrode production line there, they wouldn't have to import the carbon. One could imagine a new partnership with Axion, Toyota and Kurray, where they are building the batteries in Japan, while helping to build the business of Kurray in the process. But for my scenario to work, Toyota's LA battery supplier would also have to be located in Japan. So anyone know who it is, and if they have AGM capacity?
    Hey if I'm going to dream, I might as well dream big!
    21 Oct 2012, 10:01 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "But for my scenario to work, Toyota's LA battery supplier would also have to be located in Japan. So anyone know who it is, and if they have AGM capacity?"

     

    Exide supplies batteries for at least some Toyota models sold in U.S.
    21 Oct 2012, 11:00 PM Reply Like
  • BugEYE
    , contributor
    Comments (194) | Send Message
     
    Labtech,
    IIRC, kurray's coconut factory is located in Philippines, where coconuts are abundant I suppose.
    21 Oct 2012, 11:05 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The only Japanese battery manufacturer I can identify by name is GS YAUSA and they definitely have AGM capability. On the other issue, I think that Toyota is a more likely choice than Hyundai because Toyota is working hand in glove with BMW on powertrain and electrification issues and I can't recall ever seeing Hyundai and BMW used in the same sentence.
    22 Oct 2012, 12:40 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    I'd like to see them team up with Maxwell Technologies. Both are in the business of making electrodes with carbon, both have patented technology as their biggest assets, both need to diversify, both are working their way into stop-start applications. Axion has developing connections in Europe; Maxwell has sales and manufacturing in China. Axion needs cash; Maxwell has cash.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Maxwell would probably not be a good fit for Axion because of the overlaps. I spent a day with David Schramm in the spring of 2011 and we have a remarkably parallel view of what the impact of stop-start will be. The bottom line is everybody who brings a cost-effective product to market will have more business than they can handle and the last thing anyone needs is distractions that dilute their focus.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    Besides the obvious candidates for a strategic partnership, I will put forth as my SWAG,..........Mitsui.
    23 Oct 2012, 10:50 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Would be nice since Mitsui just invested $15 Million in Viridity Energy.

     

    Any kind of Toyota deal would probably change perceptions radically in Asia w.r.t Axion. Lithium has all the buzz there as here, although in Korea ZBB has made some inroads, though I haven't seen any PR on Honam actually selling any of their jointly developed flow batteries since this:

     

    http://bit.ly/Tdp5oe

     

    (which admittedly will take a while to be tested and the results publicized)

     

    http://bit.ly/SmTNIW

     

    (July 24, 2012 )

     

    "Under terms of the agreement, Honam paid ZBB Energy $3 million over a four-quarter period and gained non-exclusive rights to sell the ZBB EnerStore battery in Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore, and Malaysia, in addition to Korea.

     

    ...

     

    The two companies have agreed to extend the first phase of their collaboration to September 30, 2012, and are currently discussing a manufacturing ramp-up and joint marketing plans"

     

    Could Axion find a partner to compete with Panasonic Energy Storage Solutions in Japan? Could cheaper but bigger beat (or at least compete with) more expensive but smaller there???? An interesting cultural mix of practical, yet in love with their cell phones that are move advanced than ours (at least in the integration of them into the payment of goods)
    23 Oct 2012, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    ´"Would be nice since Mitsui just invested $15 Million in Viridity Energy."

     

    wtb - that is why it is my SWAG.

     

    Looked at Viridity website http://bit.ly/XPnxSh

     

    and had not noticed they have links to:

     

    SCE Demand Response Programs
    PG&E Demand Response Programs
    CAISO website
    FERC Electric Power Markets
    PJM Demand Response
    NYISO Demand Response

     

    Also appear to be actively working in other regions of the U.S. besides just PJM:
    http://bit.ly/Sg5cfw#

     

    Regional Contacts for More Information:

     

    California Dave Schrock california@viridityene...
    Texas Eric Alam texas@viridityenergy.com
    All other regions Kevin Morelock solutions@viridityener...
    23 Oct 2012, 12:15 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Is Mitsubishi a top 5 Asian brand?
    23 Oct 2012, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    Futurist,
    No, not even in Asia. However, Mitsui does not make automobiles.
    23 Oct 2012, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Ok,
    I was confusing TGs statement that a top 5 Asian car maker was testing the PbC and his talk of a strategic partner.
    My mistake. Now the conversation makes more sense.

     

    In that light I am liking the Viridity/Mitsu/Axion connection a lot.
    On the other hand my ZBB investment has not liked the Honan /ZBB connection. I like what ZBB has accomplished worldwide with strategic partners. However, the stock price hates it. I think it has been seen as lessening profit although I do not agree.
    23 Oct 2012, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    I'm sure TG has binders of prospects...
    19 Oct 2012, 09:26 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "guess/speculate as to who Axion might be in discussions with in regards to a strategic partnership? "

     

    Might it be a bit easier to first assess the amount of capital Axion is likely to need for operations and PbC electrode capacity expansion over the next, say, two years? Is Axion looking to raise $5 million or $15 million?

     

    Axion's bio-carbon supplier, Kurray?
    The Fortune 500 company JP mentioned talking to in APC 165
    A large public utility such as AES, Duke, Southern Co.
    A manufacturer/chemical processor currently maintaining large banks of LABs for power reliability and backup.
    19 Oct 2012, 09:41 PM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1844) | Send Message
     
    Bosch?
    20 Oct 2012, 10:09 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Good guess.
    20 Oct 2012, 10:21 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Actually Bosch and Metair holdings (because of their interest in both a LAB supplier First National Battery/Rombat and Valeo) are good guesses. I say this because these two companies would have the most to gain by having lower cost battery systems in vehicles to support their other efforts in vehicle efficiency & electrification. The content they are looking to provide in other areas of the vehicle besides the energy storage system far outweighs the losses they might incur by supplying a less than robust LAB for things like base SS all the way up to hybrids.

     

    For companies like JCI and Exide the PBC might represent more of a threat because they gain sales by having a shorter life cycle for the LAB. Same for the battery arms of Bosch and Metair but over all they would gain vehicle content in areas that are far more lucrative.
    20 Oct 2012, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    OT. Possible tech development with implications for "oil" supply and ocean acidification. http://bit.ly/RLVTBd
    <
    What the U.S. Navy Has Invented

     

    The Naval Research Laboratory is using an electrochemical acidification cell (see image below) to take seawater through a two-step process to capture carbon dioxide and produce hydrogen gas. Carbon dioxide is concentrated in seawater at levels 140 times greater than in the atmosphere. A portion of it is carbonic acid and carbonate, but most is bicarbonate. Harvesting all that carbon coupled with the hydrogen is what the electrochemical acidification cell does employing a catalyst similar to that used to create synthetic oil from coal but with much greater efficiency.
    <
    19 Oct 2012, 09:47 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    I read about this tech recently. Air Force and Navy have been working on this for creating synergic fuels for some time.

     

    http://bit.ly/VlpHLV–Tropsch_process (Screwy SA link system. Check the Fischer Tropsch entry on Wikipedia. )

     

    It will be ideal for nuclear aircraft carriers to create synthetic jet fuel while en route, alleviating long supply lines for long missions.

     

    But the electrochemical acidification process of converting dissolved CO2 into methanol and then Fischer-tropsch synthesizing long chain hydrocarbons is extremely energy intensive. Cheap nuclear energy on a mega carrier makes it possible, but it will not be a viable long term solution to the world's energy needs and carbon balance issues unless somebody comes up with an even cheaper large scale source of energy.

     

    With the Pentagon's budget it is a solution to logistics issues and foreign petroleum dependence. But as a commercial process for us civilians it is unlikely to supplant petroleum in our lifetimes.
    19 Oct 2012, 10:02 PM Reply Like
  • tonys23
    , contributor
    Comments (96) | Send Message
     
    Maybe Romney has that in mind with his extra 2 trillion for defense spending ..... :)
    20 Oct 2012, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Recently there have been many greenwash articles about magically creating fuels out of air or water.

     

    Here is a more realistic perspective.

     

    The Big Question Mark Over Gasoline from Air
    http://bit.ly/WEAf89
    22 Oct 2012, 07:11 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Very interesting, SM. Thanks for the info.

     

    A possible future large scale energy source in the form of large ocean currents comes to mind. But, drawing energy out of those ocean currents has the down side of slowing them down/reducing the water flow to some extent (however negligible) with possible adverse climatic effects.
    19 Oct 2012, 11:09 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3805) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/S9q1cE

     

    There is no solution to the greenhouse gas problem, if there even is a problem. We are due: The next Ice Age is on the horizon. Turn on your toasters now.

     

    Vehicles & machines, heat and electric lights, refrigeration to keep people and food fresh, computing/data servers/technology: All on the increase. Putting aside the emerging economies of billions of people looking for what Americans consider the status quo, the next massive incremental need for more energy? Desalination of water would be my guess.

     

    IMHO, the challenge we have going forward can be reduced to an immense energy problem.

     

    Lead batteries are 99% recyclable. That benefit has NOTHING to due with mitigating greenhouse gases. It has everything to do with the fact that there is a limited supply of lead.

     

    Even if we just use batteries for short-term storage of diurnal solar or bidiurnal (sorry) tidal energies, that fills some part of the need. According to the article I linked, about 7 billion pounds of lead is mined each year. How much energy can that much lead store?

     

    And now I'm out of refrigerated Budweiser.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:59 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The fascinating thing about lead reserves is that they only constitute a very small percentage of the known resources. The USGS pegs global lead reserves at 85 million metric tons, but it footnotes that number to point out that "In recent years, significant lead resources have been demonstrated in association with zinc and/or silver or copper deposits in Australia, China, Ireland, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Russia, and the United States (Alaska). Identified lead resources of the world total more than 1.5 billion tons."

     

    http://on.doi.gov/x6Am9R

     

    Lead is the only metal resource I've seen with comparable footnote disclosure in USGS reports. It's also the closest thing the world has to a "single use commodity" where substantially all global production is used for batteries.
    20 Oct 2012, 02:09 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3805) | Send Message
     
    hehehe - red wine is green: No refrigeration necessary.
    20 Oct 2012, 01:08 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Edmund: Shades of light green? Any decent sommelier will tell you red wine is best if chilled somewhat before opening. Bon appetite!

     

    http://bonapp.it/RKk2bF
    20 Oct 2012, 09:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Maya, I like my Ripple warm so's I can feel the bite!

     

    Cold, You miss the subtle nuances. Also needs to be shaken to get the goodness off the bottom. Mmmm Mmmm.

     

    And for those special occasions a little Champipple. :)

     

    http://bit.ly/XCoA7O
    20 Oct 2012, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    Yes, Ripple, nuances of cat's pee, barnyard and bull nettles on the nose. Nothing quite like it.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    metro, LOL. Best enjoyed under one of your formerly described bridges. Can't forget the atmosphere to compliment the occasion.

     

    Almost like a sunset, sand, rolling waves and some good conversation.

     

    Now the hard part. So many choices.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:33 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Especially if you chase it with a nice Petrus or Chateau Yquem.
    20 Oct 2012, 12:37 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3805) | Send Message
     
    And now we're at 33,003. Movin' the needle.
    20 Oct 2012, 01:10 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    If you want to be precise, the count currently stands at 33,006 (including this comment)
    20 Oct 2012, 09:29 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Ford better be careful or they are going to be Fix Or Repair Daily again. The dealers can't tell the customers that the system is a POS with the current battery and they are driving too many of their customers nuts. The real solution, Take two aspirin, get thee to the Axion concentrator board and then grin and bear it. Ya got screwed by the auto companies and yer government.
    -
    Stop Start Doesn't Work Very Often

     

    "I was fed up of going back to the garage every other week and even the garage staff were saying see you next week that I decided to hand the Focus back and changed it for the C-Max Zetec instead and personally I have found it to be a better car to drive"

     

    "I have just started having the same problem with my 1600 TDCI. Owned my car for 4 months now, and am used to the stop start system only working when there is no heat/aircon/lighting demands, etc. but it has just stopped working. Even after a long drive (200 miles) when everything is up to temperature, and battery well charged the engine no longer cuts out when car is at a standstill. Also if I press the on/off over-ride button, the dashboard "@" symbol doesn't illuminate anymore. I am sure the problem started to happen when I forgot to turn off ignition (after coming to a halt and the engine did cut out), before opening the driver door getting out and then turning off the ignition. So if anyone knows a trick or two to reset this function that is baffling my local dealers, I would be grateful."

     

    http://bit.ly/RarAHa
    20 Oct 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Nope, Looks like they figured it out. C/Net review
    -
    Ford Focus 2011 Titanium

     

    Good
    Striking, exciting design
    Efficient engine
    Bluetooth and DAB radio as standard
    Optional feature enables car to park itself
    Bad
    Button overload inside
    Useless auto start-stop feature

     

    http://bit.ly/VfKU4g
    20 Oct 2012, 04:19 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    I hope that auto manufacturers implementing stop start with batteries that do not function adequately do not turn the public off to stop start before PbC has a chance to ride to the rescue.
    21 Oct 2012, 01:57 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Since stop-start is being implemented as a regulatory compliance tool rather than a consumer option, it doesn't matter whether consumers like it or not. Consumers hated seat belts, crankcase ventilation and catalytic converters, but they got them anyway because regulation is more powerful than choice.
    21 Oct 2012, 02:27 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "Since stop-start is being implemented as a regulatory compliance tool rather than a consumer option,"

     

    But that only advantages PbC acceptance when compliance measures recognize short-lived AGM and FLAB support of S/S and battery replacement costs to sustain S/S are made known.
    21 Oct 2012, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I see several fundamental forces that favor the PbC. The long-term certainty is growing regulatory concern that stop-start systems lose efficiency rapidly. The near-term pressure will arise when a performance oriented automaker implements the PbC and starts pointing out how much better their systems are than the competition.
    21 Oct 2012, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • merigoldman
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    Here's the full paragraph from the cnet review.

     

    Auto start-stop, which should turn the engine off automatically when you're stationary to save fuel, is included in all 1.6 engines, although it didn't work on our test model. We have our doubts as to how useful this feature would be. Ford says it will only cut in when the engine is warm, the external temperature is between 0 and 30C°, there's 'no high demand on the climate control', the battery has sufficient charge, you haven't disabled it, and, crucially, when the gear is in neutral and the clutch is released. When we're waiting for a red light to change, we tend to stay in first gear with the clutch depressed, which makes this version of start-stop rather useless in our case.
    21 Oct 2012, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I always love it when auto reviewers decide that a technology has limited merit because it doesn't perfectly mesh with their personal driving style.

     

    He's also talking about an entry level Ford system instead of the high-efficiency micro-hybrid market where the PbC will shine.

     

    That's the nice thing about a 35 million vehicle per year market, there's plenty of room for Ford to take the cheap route while others take a higher road.
    21 Oct 2012, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    I agree with with what you say John. But from what I've seen it's not just Ford pumping some of this low end garbage into the field. Even BMW has got some low end systems out there and you can see some of the frustration in the forms. And it's not just the frustration of the battery being sub par for the job. It's the reprogram charge when you get a new battery.

     

    I've emphasized it before. IMHO the industry and the government, specifically Europe, is really failing miserably and it's first and foremost because of the crap enhanced flooded and AGM batteries. Just plain junk for the app. The consumer is getting taken for a sucker unless they get an existing higher priced option or what we're waiting for. And even the higher priced options are not all that good. ie the Continental Ultracap/flooded system because of the hotel low problem.
    21 Oct 2012, 01:11 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Stop-start is one of those forehead slapping sensible ideas that can't be shoved back into the box now that it's released. Seriously, can you think of a more obvious or sensible way to save fuel than turning off the engine in a stopped car?

     

    In my experience regulators are a lot like mastiffs and once you throw them a bone they guard it, even if you try to entice them with a new bone. That's particularly true when the first bone promises to reduce exhaust fumes for pedestrians in cities where traffic tends to back up. It's economy that the regulators can brag about to all their constituents from the motorists who save gas to the carless who breathe easier.
    21 Oct 2012, 01:19 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Understood and I agree with the concept. Just that this first low end step is such an example of poor execution. The automakers get a regulatory efficiency credit, the regulators get a political "At a boy" and the consumer of the lower end systems gets the economic shaft.

     

    It's not like I've never seen it before. It's that I've been brought up and trained to hate waste and these initial low end systems fit the waste category. And that's why I think you see the Asians scrambling around for other paths. Because advanced flooded and AGM for this app. makes very little sense.

     

    I don't think it's going away either and I don't think it should. All the hard work has been done to electrify the sub systems to allow for it. They just need the right lower cost energy storage systems to optimize the energy harvesting opportunities. It's one of the top reasons I'm interested in this sector right now. I'm waiting for the final leg of the glacial journey. And it's a very big hunk of I.C.E. looking for a solution.
    21 Oct 2012, 01:36 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I suppose I've just gotten used to the idea that new systems get launched before they're really ready and it takes a couple generations to work out the bugs. In this case, the bugs are called enhanced and AGM. Besides, I'm confident that the automakers will do the right thing when they've exhausted their other options.
    21 Oct 2012, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, iindelco. Next week I'll be getting my Explorer's oil changed and thanks to you and your posts I will be a little more educated when I visit the service manager's office. Last time I had the oil changed, the service manager was totally unaware that stop/start technology was coming in this year's Focus model. He wasn't real happy when I politely informed him that the stop/start feature will be rendered useless in 2.5 to 8 months.

     

    Gonna be interesting to learn what he now knows. Hoping, if a s/s Focus is on the lot, to take one for a spin.

     

    ####

     

    Once won a long driving contest in the Bahamas years ago. The winning prize? A bottle of Night Train Express. Believe me when I tell you that the next day it felt like I got hit by one.
    20 Oct 2012, 04:40 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Maya, If i might recommend. Take a couple of the web addresses to them so they can get some back-up along with your shared enlightenment. You'll be the smart guy and with the sites a tad more credible. You'll be doing them a big favor for sure.

     

    PS. I find new posts by going to the top right corner and clicking on the posters name. Then once I get to the posters page I click on the post I wish to read and it takes me to the page with the intended post. In doing so all I get is the initial few words of the post until I get to the final concentrator page where the post is located.

     

    In seeing just the first few words of your post I thought you were going to thank me for my prowess at incredible wine recommendations. Oh well! ;))
    20 Oct 2012, 05:13 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    10/19/2012: (AXPW) EOD stuff partially copied from the instablog (up in an 30 mins or so).
    # Trds: 31, MinTrSz: 200, MaxTrSz: 10000, Vol 115753, AvTrSz: 3734
    Min. Pr: 0.2901, Max Pr: 0.3000, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.2962
    # Buys, Shares: 22 77913, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.2980
    # Sells, Shares: 9 37840, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.2926
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 2.06:1 (67.3% “buys”), DlyShts 52700 (45.53%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 139.27%

     

    As expected, the short sales percentage increased. In all honesty, I had predicted this based on past behavior of the shorts in isolation and then added in the expectation of falling volume. All this was based on my (possibly wishful?) expectation that our recent and current high-volume foray to the $0.29xx lows might be just an “overshoot” as the last of the “flippers” (my best guess) from our 18 days below $0.30 got out in a hurry in fear that they might miss all the profit potential.

     

    Will it be just an “overshoot”? Hard to say, but the two days of lowering volume while VWAP movement was quite small ($0.3004 & $0.2962) subsequent to the ~944K “sell off” 10/17, and the buy:sell remaining relatively strong in the face of severe selling pressure and then recovering (five consecutive days' approximate volume and “buy” percentages: 375K 56.5%, 310K 49.9%, 944K 52.8%, 564K 40.9%, and 116K 67.3%) would be suggestive of “overshoot”. Add in that four times in the past $0.30 has generally demonstrated support (although it failed miserably to support anything in the 9/10 – 10/5 period).

     

    So is there anything that either supports or negates the possibility it's just an “overshoot”?

     

    On the traditional TA front, yes. The first is a positive divergence of RSI. Last time we had prices in the current range (9/10 – 9/17) before the step down to the lows of 9/28 and 10/1 when we hit $0.25xx, RSI average over that period was ~37. The last two days have been ~46.4 and ~42.6 – the former higher than the highest in that prior period and the latter just below the high then , ~47. The prior period's low was ~32. A similar divergence is seen vs. an even earlier period in this range, 8/2 – 8/22, which had RSI ranges similar to those mentioned, although I've not bothered to calculate the average. Some folks give this divergence a fair amount of weight – I'm unsure how much to give it, especially short-term.

     

    I also note that only one day after the foray into the $0.25xx area we had highs >= to $0.30, a very quick recovery. And we now have 14 consecutive days with highs of $0.30 or greater (we hit $0.34 one day – the day that had the high-volume sell-off) even with the apparent selling pressure with volume (~944K) noted on 10/17. I think the sell-off on a day we hit the $0.34 reinforces my thoughts that “flippers” from the 18 days below $0.30 took their profits and could be exhausted now.

     

    Trade volume for the 18 days and subsequent to that period are 7319.41K and 4399.36K respectively. Is it safe to assume that the remainder are either “strong hands” or awaiting a much higher price to take profit? I can't say. But we know we've now traded about 60% of that 18-day volume. You might want to apply your own best guesstimates here.

     

    My experimentally-short Bollinger Bands (13 periods instead of the normal 20) show the bottom one rising rapidly and our current low is “pushing” on it. My observation with these experimental settings is that price “bounces” off this bottom level within roughly 4 days, usually, at the most. If it doesn't we tend to go lower. So if we see a bounce up in the next day or two, the prognosis is pretty good.

     

    That new short-term rising support I mentioned the other day is now at ~$0.30 (with magnifier, seems to be $0.2997) and if we are in an “overshoot” we should move right back above it in just a day or two.

     

    On my experimental charts front ...

     

    With the low volume today we had a big fall-off in average trade size. Market-makers having to work harder to make trades is my guess as to the cause. Anyway, last time we had this combination of a short-sales spike followed by high and then reducing volume and short-sales bottoming and then trending higher (check my charts for the 6/4-6/25 period) with trade size falling way below the long-term trend in a day, we had a nice little bump up from 6/14's $0.30 low and VWAP that “flattened” out in the VWAP area of $0.34/$0.35 for three weeks ... before continuing the down trend. A difference to be considered ...

     

    Are our “big sellers” really gone? If so, we might not “top out” as before and then trend down. What we might see, and what I hope for, is the continued “grind” behavior that is symptomatic of a “healthier” market with a normal mixture of investors and traders actively working their portfolios.

     

    One thing I'm certain of – if we don't spend an extended period below $0.30 again any short-term traders will be looking to sell at higher prices if they start buying in quantity.

     

    A brief discussion of the "inflection point" calculations and the "Dly Sht % of 'sells'" is omitted here.

     

    HardToLove
    20 Oct 2012, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Listen to his resume. I think he's an adjunct Axionista. Need to keep an eye on this one over the longer term.

     

    Interview:

     

    Subhash Dhar: Energy Power Systems

     

    Part 1

     

    http://bit.ly/TnGCfr

     

    Part 2

     

    http://bit.ly/QH34di
    20 Oct 2012, 07:30 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Great find iindelco, I'm only halfway into part 1, but wow, no way this guy hasn't been around these parts extensively, either that or he's independently arrived at virtually all our common conclusions simply from the wider facts available to everyone... either way, it's greatly supportive of the Axionista view of the world..
    20 Oct 2012, 08:01 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Oops, Sorry all. didn't realize there were added parts beyond 1 and 2. I wanted to get it up for anyone looking for some weekend reading material so I posted after listening to almost all of part 2.

     

    Anyway...Part 3

     

    http://bit.ly/TAfqED
    20 Oct 2012, 08:19 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    48, I'd posted an article from this gentleman before and I wanted to see if he had any added material out. Tis interesting for sure.
    20 Oct 2012, 08:23 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Note: Part 3 is redundant up until about the 10 minute mark.

     

    PS If you're invested/interested in Axion you better listen to part 3.
    20 Oct 2012, 08:32 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    My internet connection is very slow (almost unusable). Did i hear him say that he ran Ener1 and then EnerDel? Vani came from Ener1 didn't he? I wish he was a bit more specific about what it is he is doing but I would bet it has something to do with carbon
    20 Oct 2012, 09:11 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Tim, Ener1 and EnerDel were affiliated. Here's the announcement of his transition to Ener1 from Ovanic (NiMH batteries). This should be clearer about his later years.

     

    http://bit.ly/RS6L48
    20 Oct 2012, 09:28 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "I wish he was a bit more specific about what it is he is doing but I would bet it has something to do with carbon"

     

    Definitely possible, but very near the end of Part 3, Dhar comments make me think he is working primarily with materials that have been in LAB for some time.

     

    His said something to effect that the problem with Nimh batteries was no so much a matter of how much nickel was in the battery but that it was there and how effectively it was used. And, he suggested he did not see any fundamental problem with the chemistries tried by Firefly or some unnamed UK battery startup. AND, he said rather clearly that his company was working mostly on nucleization of the materials the LAB battery.
    20 Oct 2012, 10:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, This would be my guess for the unnamed British company. It's been discussed here.

     

    Altraverda Bipolar Battery

     

    http://bit.ly/TApuNP
    20 Oct 2012, 11:13 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Altaraverda. Thanks for the URL.
    20 Oct 2012, 11:39 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    I, too, wish he told us what he is doing to LAB chemistry; and I, too, think he is probably doing something with carbon.

     

    He distinguished energy and power and said he was specializing in power, but then be started waving his hands about addressing both.

     

    His talk would have been more informative, IMO, if we knew what technology he is talking about.
    21 Oct 2012, 02:16 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    IIRC, they're working on a bi-polar lead-acid battery. Bi-polar devices have been one of those 'holy grail' ideas people have pursued for decades without notable success, but somebody will eventually find a design that works. It's unclear to me how a carbon negative would work in a bi-polar design, but there's no clear reason why it wouldn't work. If it does, the Axion patents are broad enough to encompass a bi-polar device.
    21 Oct 2012, 02:31 AM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    It comes out that he was instrumental in the development of NiH technology and the EV1. When asked if NiH will make a comeback, he said Ni is too expensive.
    21 Oct 2012, 02:43 AM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    He said he was using different chemistry than Firefly, which was mentioned as using carbon, so maybe he isn't using carbon after all.
    21 Oct 2012, 02:45 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    NiMH is a great chemistry for HEVs. It's been the go to choice ever since Toyota introduced it in the Prius. Nickel costs are a major issue for NiMH. Rare earth metal prices are an even bigger issue because the M is the rare earth metal lanthanum. While Lynas and MolyCorp are promising to increase global lanthanum supplies, most of the rare earth metal value chain is concentrated in China and it doesn't do a whole lot of good to have mines outside China if the material has to pass through China on its way to becoming a finished product.

     

    Firefly used a structural carbon foam to replace the structural lead grids used in conventional batteries. Once the foam cores were fabricated, they went through the same pasting processes. The biggest benefit of the Firefly technology was that structural carbon is lighter than structural lead, which means a greater percentage of the battery weight was "chemically active lead." The carbon foam cores offered the same advantages as carbon paste additives, but they didn't change the fundamental nature of the battery.
    21 Oct 2012, 02:52 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Well, As a side note since we're on the topic, we might just as well take a moment to recognize the passing of a great human recently.

     

    Stanford Ovshinsky dies at 89; inventor founded new field of electronics

     

    http://lat.ms/QzWx69
    -
    Back OT, I liked the 3rd video in the series posted because of his comments on the time required to launch battery tech. and especially his words on automotive. John, You've been pretty vocal about the test time it takes to launch new batteries for auto apps and I was happy to find another soul that spent a life time in automotive throwing out the same general numbers. I've lived it as well but for those that haven't it was a good piece of "trust but verify" information to share with all of the "I want to kill something" Axionistas (Myself included even though I know better.). For me the timing described in the 3rd video was a good piece for the board.
    21 Oct 2012, 09:06 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    He mentioned that the auto industry was a long road and their immediate focus was on something else. I could not understand what he said. It sounded like Smartway. Could anyone make sense of what he said?
    21 Oct 2012, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Tim, If you're looking for clarity in a section I might be able to discern what he's saying. In what section and time frame are you looking for clarification? Don't feel like listening to the whole thing again right away.
    21 Oct 2012, 10:22 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, thanks but you don't need to spend time this because of me. but if you are curious, it was part three and in the same section that he talks about the auto industry. immediately following iirc...
    21 Oct 2012, 10:41 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Tim, First he talks about validation cycles being too long in automotive for a start-up company explaining they needs revenues. Then he talks about testing for (My best guess) "smart grid" to get to market more quickly. Next he reemphasizes that automotive validation cycles are about 4 years which is one of the primary reasons I indicated Axionists needed to listen to the piece. It helps to hear it from more than one source because it is for outsiders of the industry hard to imagine it takes that long.

     

    PS I have no problem going beck to the material and enjoy taking this learning trip with such a group as this. It's just easier to answer your question if you use the Youtube time lapse feature at the bottom of the clip to help steer us toward the area where it's difficult to hear. It was a horrible clip for sure. He's obviously right next to a major highway and it also seems an airport. :)
    21 Oct 2012, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1345) | Send Message
     
    thanks iindelco, smart grid makes more sense than smart way (trucking program). I appreciate your time.

     

    PS understood. my air card has been "optimized" by verizon which means that all my packets go to the end of the line. which means my youtube experience is painful! wait 15 sec, play 3 sec, wait 15 sec...
    21 Oct 2012, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Yeah Tim, I've been hearing some grumbling from others with "higher" bandwidth smart devices that are heavy users. Seems they are tightening up on the bandwidth afforded users. And many unlimited plans are not unlimited any more. You could see that coming from a mile away.

     

    I have a link to the government "Smartway" program. I'm not fluent on it for sure but I digest a little at a time. It's really for all transportation if I recall correctly.

     

    For anyone interested.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/Scavwv
    21 Oct 2012, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    For reference I think this is the article I posted on Energy Power Systems awhile back.

     

    http://bit.ly/NnUIeB
    20 Oct 2012, 09:31 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Yep, There she is outside again as WTB suggested. New pic 10/18/2012 of the NS 999.

     

    http://bit.ly/RaW6kp
    20 Oct 2012, 11:43 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Another posted yesterday: http://bit.ly/XKNthM
    22 Oct 2012, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    I wonder what this could mean.......
    22 Oct 2012, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Thanks WTB.

     

    It's nice to have the train enthusiast crowd to piggyback for updates.
    22 Oct 2012, 01:17 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, wt. Comparing the 2 pics I suspect they are pics of the same location from different angles. The NS 8011 is nearby in both as are some robust concrete walling.
    22 Oct 2012, 01:47 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Probably means they finished the prep work and need the bay space to work on something else while they wait for the batteries to arrive.
    22 Oct 2012, 03:39 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Oh well, One's gotta dream! Soon hopefully but not OTR...yet.

     

    http://bit.ly/PiBnfU
    20 Oct 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    A CLASSIC NEW VIDEO – COMPOST POWERED CARS FROM THE ONION

     

    http://aol.it/ReUZP0
    21 Oct 2012, 03:27 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    John: ISTM that "The Onion" qualifies as compost, does it not? We could make a car out of it too! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    21 Oct 2012, 09:37 AM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1844) | Send Message
     
    Shades of Elon?
    21 Oct 2012, 09:46 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3108) | Send Message
     
    I love it! Great video making fun of the ease of making biofuel.
    21 Oct 2012, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I saw it as broader than biofuel. In my view it applies to all things alternative from power generation to storage to use. It made my sides ache.
    21 Oct 2012, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    " Step One- Come up with the idea
    Step Two- Implement the idea"

     

    Why didn't I think of that? LOL funny
    22 Oct 2012, 07:45 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    It's pure brownwash.
    22 Oct 2012, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Pretty big range extender.

     

    Global solution for long distance electric mobility - ebuggy

     

    http://bit.ly/Pjsjrk
    21 Oct 2012, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I wonder what the added weight does to your range per kWh?
    21 Oct 2012, 10:13 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    That's the beauty of selling things in the aftermarket. They need to worry about things like safety and durability but they skirt some of the government regs. And efficiency? Well no sense getting bogged down with details.

     

    I do like the concept though.
    21 Oct 2012, 10:59 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    "On Wednesday, October 10, 2012, a U.S. federal trademark registration number 85749969 was filed for RESIDENTIAL ENERGY STORAGE HUB by Rosewater Energy, LLC with the description Residential energy storage system, renewable energy interface and buffer, uninterruptable power supply, battery back-up, power conditioning and grid tie-in."

     

    http://bit.ly/T8TiEU
    21 Oct 2012, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (631) | Send Message
     
    From the Sunday comics. Enjoy.

     

    http://bit.ly/T5Q80i
    21 Oct 2012, 05:13 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4073) | Send Message
     
    OT

     

    Did you know the same day Felix Baumgartner broke the speed of sound skydiving Chuck Yeager, the first man to break the speed of sound, on the 65th anniversary of his feat? http://bit.ly/TBUAVk
    22 Oct 2012, 01:48 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I have to be impressed with any man who's still doing what he loves at the age of 89. That's clearly the right stuff.
    22 Oct 2012, 02:16 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (791) | Send Message
     
    Share this article:

     

    How Grid Parity (Among Other Fallacies) Almost Killed The Solar Industry...

     

    http://bit.ly/yE6bt4

     

    Have a good day-Carlos
    22 Oct 2012, 08:39 AM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    ‎"October. This is one of the peculiarly dangerous months to speculate in stocks in. The others are July, January, September, April, November, May, March, June, December, August and February." - Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar
    22 Oct 2012, 08:56 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Hmmmm gapped down to $.255 this morning, then immediately back to $.29...

     

    Needless to say my ancient $.25 trade did not trigger, once again, but frankly that's there from habit rather than either need or strategy by this point.
    22 Oct 2012, 09:56 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    .255. To gap down that far and to pick up that trade, someone got a good deal.
    22 Oct 2012, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    TB, I was wondering who that was fishing next to me. You're a better caster than I. Or your sinker weighs more! :)
    22 Oct 2012, 10:09 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    .255. So could that be considered a double bottom coupled with the Oct 1 bottom of .251? Over the last few months my bottom has tripled, but that is another matter. I'm back to digging around on the bottom of the pants pile in Zara looking for the largest possible size.
    22 Oct 2012, 10:50 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >metro ... Hmmm ... Could this spread be another Technical indicator we might use to analyze Axion's bottoming consolidation process?
    22 Oct 2012, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    I'm hoping the spread doesn't get any larger as I staggered (survived) 400 meters this morning and was rendered immobile while gasping for breath and retching from the exertion. Let's hope that Axion's performance is better than mine and is able to retch and gasp its way to a higher share price..
    22 Oct 2012, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Reading charts on OTCQB, it appears that .255 was the largest volume transaction of the day so far @ 21,980 shares or ~ 1/2 of volume thus far. Anyone see the MM handling the sale offer?
    22 Oct 2012, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    In 58 seconds, latest to earliest:
    $0.2940 8400
    $0.2800 3800
    $0.2900 200
    $0.2550 2980
    $0.2550 15000

     

    ATDF was on the bid at $0.255 at the open. IIRC, BTIG had the $0.2975 offer at the time. So someone came in and hit the bid that never showed on L2.

     

    HardToLove
    EDIT: NITE nowhere around any of the action.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "ATDF was on the bid at $0.255 at the open. IIRC, BTIG had the $0.2975 offer at the time. So someone came in and hit the bid that never showed on L2."

     

    Thanks.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Posted a link on Hella's SS efforts in concentrator 163. This one has more detail.

     

    Hella Bringing Stop-Start to Next Level

     

    "To ensure drivers don’t lose steering or braking, both powered by the engine, the Hella system has a backup battery to ensure if one fails the other will kick in, Fischer says, noting the twin-battery setup also can be programmed to maintain the temperature inside the cabin following engine shutdown."

     

    http://bit.ly/VjMXnU
    22 Oct 2012, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    "Depending on the preference of the OEM customer, the backup energy storage device can be a low-powered lithium-ion battery pack or double-layer capacitors."

     

    Doesn't seem like "double-layer capacitors" would be a description for PbC.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    metro, In my mind if they were testing PbC they wouldn't say it. Too much information. Plus Hella, like most UPS providers, would design for multiple energy storage devices. Unlike the US government they know enough not to pick winners in a market that has yet to mature where there are no obvious solutions.

     

    I find the comments on reliability to be of interest. Once you start electrifying critical functions and you're going to start shutting down the engine at high speeds MTBF becomes a little bit more important in some areas. Since ordinary LABS are hard to assess for remaining life, I'm not sure they fit the bill for both parties in a redundant system. Not to mention their poor DCA which reduces the effectiveness of a higher cost system.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The PbC is technically an asymmetric double layer capacitor, but it's really hard to say who is testing what.

     

    If you go to Axion's Form 10-K and peruse the patent titles you'll find:

     

    · U.S. Patent No. 6,466,429 (expires May 2021) - Electric double layer capacitor;
    · U.S. Patent No. 6,628,504 (expires May 2021) - Electric double layer capacitor;
    · U.S. Patent No. 6,706,079 (expires May 2022) - Method of formation and charge of the negative polarizable carbon electrode in an electric double layer capacitor;
    · U.S. Patent No. 7,006,346 (expires April 2024) - Positive Electrode of an electric double layer capacitor;
    · U.S. Patent No. 7,110,242 (expires February 2021) - Electrode for electric double layer capacitor and method of fabrication thereof;
    · U.S. Patent No. 7,119,047 (expires February 2021) - Modified activated carbon for carbon for capacitor electrodes and method of fabrication thereof;
    · U.S. Patent No. 7,569,514 (expires May 22, 2021) - Modified activated carbon for carbon for capacitor electrodes and method of fabrication thereof; and
    · U.S. Patent No. 7,881,041(expires March 2027) – Activated Carbon Electrode with PTFE B
    · U.S. Patent No. 8,023,251(expires November 2028) – Hybrid Energy Storage Device and Method of Making Same
    · U.S. Patent No. 7,998,616(expires February 2028) – Negative Electrode for a Hybrid Energy Storage Device
    22 Oct 2012, 12:11 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    John,
    Thanks for correcting me on the double layer capacitor. I guess I just did a faceplant as thotdoc is writing about below.
    22 Oct 2012, 12:37 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    Thx John.

     

    BTW, looking at those expiration dates and the pace of our potential customers, we might have to worry about patent expiration! Only 9 years left on some! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 12:52 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The theory of patent law is that core technology patents are typically the weakest and most difficult to defend, while the practical patents that deal with how you make a device to implement the core technology are much stronger. If you think in terms of an archery target, the core patents are in the bullseye and the patents in the outer rings are the ones that provide the greatest protection, and they continue providing protection until they expire.
    22 Oct 2012, 01:02 PM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1962) | Send Message
     
    OT: If you ever asked yourself, "Why did I do that? or "How did I get here...again?" You will get the answers to those questions and what to do about it in my new book, No More Faceplants. http://bit.ly/TCvAx7 or Amazon.

     

    I have a blog on the website that you may find interesting, also.

     

    OK, thanks and back to the business at hand.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Well ole 999 is participating on the bid. :)
    22 Oct 2012, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (274) | Send Message
     
    I misread that as "NS 999".....
    22 Oct 2012, 12:08 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    My latest is up on SA, a continuation on the theme that wind and solar are polluting the electric grid and the chief beneficiary will be storage.

     

    http://bit.ly/XKEI7v
    22 Oct 2012, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1962) | Send Message
     
    You have outdone yourself this time. You've written about this before, but this time it is more clear...or maybe it's the repetition of the theme.

     

    This is another example of what always trips businesses up: there are always two aspects to productivity to consider: productivity and the risk associated with the structures and processes you use to be productive.

     

    If you don't manage the risk specifically associated with the structures and processes...you always end up defeating yourself.

     

    For example, the American automobile industry in it's fighting with the unions, was only productive/profitable as long as efficiency of production and quality control were not major risks.

     

    You're saying with scarce resources, metals, electricity we are about at the place the American auto industry was before it all went bad for them ...fat, dumb and happy...till it all blows up in our face.
    22 Oct 2012, 02:36 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I don't claim to have the answers to most of these issues, but we need to be thinking about them before we drive off a cliff while admiring the majestic mountaintops.
    22 Oct 2012, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1962) | Send Message
     
    We are both Consultants. As a good consultant, we should not be giving our clients the answer; we should just be helping them see things they are not looking at.

     

    Those within the industry, really understand their risk/reward scenarios and will act accordingly.

     

    Said another way; there actually is a 'reality'. And when your model of reality does not map the real reality, you will defeat yourself.
    22 Oct 2012, 02:43 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I've been there and done that several times in my life, which is why I always tend to look for the downside risk before the upside reward. I don't want to find myself in the position of the mouse saying "let me out of this trap and you can keep the cheese."
    22 Oct 2012, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Energy Storage must be supported in the Energy Bill

     

    http://bit.ly/RdyMCs
    22 Oct 2012, 03:08 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Written by Pollyanna.
    22 Oct 2012, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    I figured you'd appreciate it. ;))

     

    Energy storage "must" be government funded. After all it's goin just chipper over there in The States. We'll lose out on all the fun and now with fox hunting off the table.
    22 Oct 2012, 03:23 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    I'd rather fund that than a war in Afghanistan or Iran. At least I would benefit from it and the money would stay in the US.
    22 Oct 2012, 03:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    The lesser dumb decision theory? :)

     

    Stone soup green energy. Now we need storage and it'll really be good. We Promise!

     

    What's that about fool me once shame on you......
    22 Oct 2012, 03:54 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    And I thought I'd heard it all. A lead star for our no good slacker may well be the first demagogue in history to draw a connection between the electric grid and conflict in the Middle East.
    22 Oct 2012, 04:04 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Just saying that, in terms of government waste, this one is pretty low on the list. And there does seem to actually be a need for grid storage. I compare it to the wars because it can also be considered relevant to national security.
    22 Oct 2012, 04:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    The plan.

     

    http://bit.ly/RQuwGu
    22 Oct 2012, 04:14 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    And I always thought it only rolled downhill!

     

    It appears it goes all the way to the top and gets polished there.
    22 Oct 2012, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (957) | Send Message
     
    thotdoc

     

    "You've written about this before, but this time it is more clear...or maybe it's the repetition of the theme."
    Agreed...much easier for non techies...new readers.
    23 Oct 2012, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Can someone give me a clue why anyone would sell at .25x since we haven't been near that number in days? My second guess was that someone placed a "market" sell order but I really do not have a clue as I said, and my first guess was a new capital raise at .25 Really happy when I looked at level 2 and saw it back at .29x
    22 Oct 2012, 12:48 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Bang, That would be my guess. Someone didn't even wait to see how the bids would line up. They just did a market sell order at the open. Foolish.
    22 Oct 2012, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Market order?

     

    Maybe someone who doesn't really follow the stock (and understand importance of limits on OTCBB) and just wanted out, perhaps doing some tax planning. Maybe the followed a "tip," didn't get quick gratification, and hit the road.

     

    Maybe someone for whom 15000*(.29-.255) = $525 just doesn't matter.
    22 Oct 2012, 12:58 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    I'd think anyone that sells at .25 does so because they thing the stock will go lower eventually. I tend to disagree hence I hold my shares and look to buy more when others give theirs away. Dollar costing in as we await the eventual upward run is the only way to play. Otherwise it might fell like water torture to some.
    22 Oct 2012, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW) through 13:08
    # Trds: 61, MinTrSz: 200, MaxTrSz: 44326, Vol 125576, AvTrSz: 5023
    Min. Pr: 0.2550, Max Pr: 0.2975, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.2852
    # Buys, Shares: 18 94328, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.2907
    # Sells, Shares: 8 31248, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.2685
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 3.02:1 (75.1% "buys")

     

    Without the two $0.255 trades, VWAP $0.2902, Av trade size 4,678, buy:sell 7.11:1 (87.7% "buys).

     

    Interesting is that the opening two trades at $0.255 *appears* to *exactly* hit the falling support line of the descending channel we re-entered last Thursday and bounced right back up off of it.

     

    I read this as a positive, especially since we've seen buying in the $0.29 range strong: only four trades below $0.29, 26,051 shares. We do need to see if it holds though - not uncommon in the past (when our big sellers were here and maybe now they're not?) to see some late-day weakness. Note that average trade size is back into normal range too.

     

    Volume already above Friday's.

     

    HardToLove
    EDIT; Someone just put a lure into the lake trying to induce selling? 200 shares $0.2887.
    22 Oct 2012, 01:42 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Or,

     

    maybe someone trying to drive/keep the share price down in an effort to pick up beau coup shares at a discount to a 30 - 60 day weighted average price similar to the last capital raise. A strategic investor might not be found at terms TG and board are willing to accept. And, potential strategic investors almost certainly pay some attention to current market valuations.

     

    maybe a MM trying to stimulate dumping and raise their transaction revenue.
    22 Oct 2012, 01:57 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    HTL - have you noted an increase in average trade size? Seems like the blocks being traded have increased lately.
    22 Oct 2012, 03:28 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    Articula: what time-frame? Today or ...?

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 03:50 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    Sorry should have been more specific - since we started the climb to .33 and back. It just feels like a different crowd - as some have alluded to.
    22 Oct 2012, 03:57 PM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2744) | Send Message
     
    Yeah I don't get who would do dumps at 50-60k shares a block. Why not space it out a little? Unless they are already spacing out...
    22 Oct 2012, 03:59 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Sometimes holders need to sell for reasons of their own and unless they're part of a select group that's required to file regulatory reports we'll never know who the sellers were or what their reasons were. In any case the more interesting question is "Who's doing the buying in the face of this weakness?" They are, after all, the people who will help determine the future direction of the market.
    22 Oct 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    Articula: Since 9/28, here's the daily average trade sizes.
    4491, 6391, 7290, 4345, 7380, 5698, 5302, 6102, 8997, 6513, 6828, 9158,
    6191, 8509, 8293, 3734, 5155 (today's).

     

    I swear I posted a comment sometime recently about seeing sizes increase and being afraid of missing another stealth rally - must have been further back than I thought. Anyway, check my instablog chart and you'll see what I noted starting around 10/1, in the most recent trend. You can also see the averages there and what they are doing.

     

    We did have an aberration 10/21, associated I believe with a "bottoming" after the large volume sell-off, but it's already started to recover to normal range.

     

    I believe if the big sellers are gone we should stabilize in what I think is a normal "retail" range - probably high 4k to low 8K? No way to know for sure. Note that this gets *really* variable on very low-volume trading. I think it's because market-makers must work many smaller trades to satisfy the aggregate amount on various orders.

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    Is it helpful to look at this from dollar terms instead of volume? Looks like we are talking $1000-$3000 (@.30c) per trade. That seems well within the normal range of retail. Maybe I'm just imagining things but bigger blocks seem to be going off...
    22 Oct 2012, 04:25 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    Articula: I have those available since Feb. too if you'd like them put up somewhere. Broken down too by "buy", "sell" and "unknown".

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 04:32 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    NS making adjustments for reduced coal shipments.

     

    End of line for 200 at NS [Bluefield Daily Telegraph, W.Va.]

     

    http://bit.ly/RQq36L
    22 Oct 2012, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Some dummy just sold at 3K $0.255 when bid/ask was $0.291/$0.2975.

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 03:43 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Some people never learn that the only way to sell OTCBB stocks is with a limit order that's a hair above the bid. Try to sell more than the bid quantity ATM and they'll nick you every time. A bit like Leo Getz

     

    http://bit.ly/PMQ0Im
    22 Oct 2012, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Must be a relative of the idiot that took a quarter for 15K this morning.
    22 Oct 2012, 06:30 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    Bang et al: on the ADVFN trade screen I see this flagged as "prior ref".

     

    So it was apparently part of an earlier trade.

     

    Don't see many of those here.

     

    Anyway, it's apparently not an doubling of the "idiot" population.

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 06:40 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Couldn't it be MM to MM?
    22 Oct 2012, 04:08 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    OR: Yes. And intra-broker or inter-broker as well.

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 04:40 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Roger.
    22 Oct 2012, 05:06 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Driving home today I thought I was looking at a Leaf over in the next lane that was slightly ahead of me. When a light change stopped us all turned out to be a Mazda2. Had the same color paint I had seen used on Leafs and overall the car was fairly unattractive like a Leaf. Never seen one on the road.

     

    Then I got to thinking about Volt spending gobs of advertising money to emphasize that the Volt is not Electric. I think that's a good clue that there is no market enthusiasm for EV's. Then my mind jumped to Tesla's valuation of something like 15 times book value IIRC. Then I thought about Tesla's aggressive roll-out plans versus what is obviously unenthusiastic EV market.

     

    This fall and winter is going to be interesting.
    22 Oct 2012, 06:37 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Bang, since it's your background and not mine, What do you think now concerning your earlier comments about the timing that Vani would have to shake something loose? If I recall correctly he's getting into the ripe phase.

     

    Of coarse things can be happening internal we don't know about.
    22 Oct 2012, 06:48 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    According to http://bit.ly/RJnpDI
    NS-999 is "back inside" today

     

    The "conversation:" http://bit.ly/RQOuRG

     

    (that resulted from my asking a question about the NS-999 pic)

     

    Never hurts to ask (politely) :-)
    22 Oct 2012, 07:08 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    10/22/2012: (AXPW) EOD stuff partially copied from my instablog (updated tomorrow A.M.).
    # Trds: 48, MinTrSz: 200, MaxTrSz: 50000, Vol 314476, AvTrSz: 6552
    Min. Pr: 0.2550, Max Pr: 0.3000, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.2919
    # Buys, Shares: 32 243828, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.2952
    # Sells, Shares: 16 70648, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.2803
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 3.45:1 (77.5% “buys”), DlyShts 137200 (43.63%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 194.20%

     

    The most notable thing today was the odd opening and an odd trade later in the day. At the open, 1,980 shares traded at $0.255 in the first two trades in the first 15 seconds. In the next 43 seconds 4 trades totaling 14K went at prices between $0.28 and $0.294, the latter being the end of that run. At 15:41:35 there was apparently another trade at $0.255 of 3K. But as I was writing this up I saw that ADVFN reported it as a “prior ref” trade.

     

    Anyway, with only three reported transactions at that price, I think it's worth seeing what things look like without them. Average trade size bumps up a bit to 6,522, VWAP moves to $0.2945 and buy:sell would move to 4.91:1 (83.1% “buys”).

     

    In a more traditional TA view ...

     

    An interesting, to me, fact about this odd-ball trade was that it went exactly, AFAICT, to the falling resistance of the trading channel we re-entered last Thursday and bounced immediately back to the $0.29xx range, with only one other lower trade of 3,800 shares at $0.2800 in that opening salvo.

     

    Another interesting fact is that we topped out right at that new short-term rising trend, now 9 days long, which was support and now represents short-term resistance.

     

    Because we came out of a short three-day move down in which we saw volume plummet in a classic volume bottoming pattern and then saw volume come back strong today on an up move (albeit quite small), I believe we have an excellent chance to see price move above that short-term line quite quickly – back into the $0.30+ area. This is bolstered by the fact that we closed above my experimental 13-period lower Bollinger band, currently $0.2903. This fits in with what I mentioned previously about if it moves off that in a couple of days it has proven positive in the past. It's not “off” it yet as I want to see the lows stay at or above it.

     

    My experimental upper Bollinger is at $0.3303. Some surprise, huh?

     

    As could be expected in such a short view, the various oscillators are mixed ATM and I would read them as more or less neutral for now.

     

    In my experimental stuff ...

     

    Volume and daily short sales have begun recovering already, suggesting we are going to move into normal trading behavior again. I already mentioned the trading sizes are recovering and are right back at three of my four averages and the buy:sell displayed good strength today.

     

    My new inflection point calculations now have four of the five calculations curling upward in concert. Only the five day is going against the grain, but this seems normal in that in past cases where we saw early signal of bullishness from these the five-day signaled early, which it did this time too, and then flipped down as the others flipped up in all the prior cases.

     

    I'll iterate that the most reliable indications of change come when several show a similar behavioral change in close proximity to each other, often with a non-sequential progression. We have that now but I encourage all to look for themselves – they are very new and I don't have confidence yet in either my interpretation of them or their reliability. One difference I note is that in the past cases the various lines where much closer to each other and had generally longer trends in the same direction. Right now we are coming out of a visually “discordant” period.

     

    This makes me say I wouldn't place much weight on them yet. But for me, they are worth considering and watching to see what results ensue.

     

    The "Dly Sht % of 'sells'" is omitted here.

     

    HardToLove
    22 Oct 2012, 07:47 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    SAE article on Hella -

     

    "Hella has expertise in the development of adaptive and modular solutions for energy management. Its components provide a flexible dc/dc converter platform in combination with a variety of energy-storage technologies, from lead-acid batteries and double-layer capacitors to lithium-ion battery cells."

     

    http://bit.ly/QCEPiy

     

    http://bit.ly/T7AQYU

     

    If Hella is pursuing this S/S, I would be surprised if they are not acquainted with Axion.
    22 Oct 2012, 09:08 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Curiosity question for iindelco and others with auto and/or electrical expertise.

     

    I read some time ago about issue of a patent for a combo shock absorber-linear alternator. Power output of the device(s) is an unknown to me, but capture of energy from a vehicle's suspension system while in motion struck me as useful in range extension of BEV/HEV vehicles. Anyone know if the idea has caught on with any of the auto makers?
    22 Oct 2012, 09:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, I remember reading about it a few years ago but haven't followed it.

     

    More power from
    bumps in the road
    MIT students develop energy-harvesting shock absorbers

     

    http://bit.ly/RTd43R
    23 Oct 2012, 08:41 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3108) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco, thanks for the link on Levant; I had not heard of them. They seem to be moving along well, and have raised $4m and have 15 employees. Learn something new everyday.

     

    http://bit.ly/UwKBq0
    http://bit.ly/TDYf4X
    23 Oct 2012, 09:11 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, iindelco. From the article, it appears energy recovery potential is better in heavy vehicles (buses, trucks) than in autos.
    23 Oct 2012, 09:16 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Rick, Thanks for tracking down this newer material.

     

    Not thought of it much but I do know they have been using active electromagnetic suspensions in more exotic vehicles for some time. Might be a perfect fit to piggyback a level of integration that's already there. Active suspension with energy recovery. Wouldn't surprise me one bit to find that it's already on some apps. Maybe only some racing circuit.
    23 Oct 2012, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, Heavier vehicles makes sense obviously. Then perhaps even more sense for military apps where you have heavy vehicles on very rough terrain in areas where you're paying hundreds of dollars/gallon for fuel.
    23 Oct 2012, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19439) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: my familiarity with such suspensions extends only to changing viscosity via a small current affecting magnetic particles in the hydraulic fluids to change damping characteristics for smooth vs. rough surfaces and performance vs. competitive suspension settings (variable rate damping). Also, variable rate power steering IIRC.

     

    Is there more going on than that in production vehicles?

     

    HardToLove
    23 Oct 2012, 10:48 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    HTL, I'm not that familiar. I've seen the tech. you mention and also the, I think older, tech. where they use proportional valves to adjust flow. Not sure if they have gotten to the point of having anything else on production vehicles or exotic race cars. Obviously they are working on it.
    23 Oct 2012, 11:10 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3108) | Send Message
     
    I was at a energy harvesting conference a year ago. The amount of energy recoverable from the suspension is irrelevant - it might run the radio sporadically.
    22 Oct 2012, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "The amount of energy recoverable from the suspension is irrelevant - it might run the radio sporadically."

     

    Thanks for the response, Rick.
    22 Oct 2012, 11:00 PM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    Way OT guys, I am so happy right now. Giants win the NL pennant!!!

     

    Kent 8-)
    22 Oct 2012, 11:47 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Yes, but now they face my Tigers!
    23 Oct 2012, 12:19 AM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    OR May the best team win. Up for a little wager like $10? Someday we will meet I believe when Axion finally goes up.

     

    Good luck to your boys and mine, I hope it is an exciting WS.

     

    Kent
    23 Oct 2012, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Tough end of the series for my Cards, but hard to complain after last year though ...
    23 Oct 2012, 03:31 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2260) | Send Message
     
    Hi Kent: May the best team win! Or the most lucky ;-)
    23 Oct 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Stop,
    I had dreams of them doing the same thing twice. But last year was a godsend to us Cards fan. I wish the Giants well.
    23 Oct 2012, 08:38 PM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (523) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » .
    TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT
    TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT
    A new concentrator is "teed up" and, without getting "teed off" (golfer's excepted, of "course"), proceed there.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT
    TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT TTTTT
    23 Oct 2012, 05:55 AM Reply Like
Full index of posts »
Latest Followers

StockTalks

More »

Latest Comments


Instablogs are Seeking Alpha's free blogging platform customized for finance, with instant set up and exposure to millions of readers interested in the financial markets. Publish your own instablog in minutes.