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  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1176) | Send Message
     
    BOOM
    25 Oct 2012, 08:06 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Shakalaka!

     

    http://bit.ly/TI1k47
    25 Oct 2012, 09:45 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (305) | Send Message
     
    Close second. And another congrats to Jon on his Forbes Asia article.
    25 Oct 2012, 08:17 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Got some nice stats for Axion here, from 10/5/2012.

     

    http://preview.tinyurl...

     

    Might explain some of the price and volume action seen?

     

    Interesting from the PDF linked there

     

    Cash To Mcap: week ago 5.66, last 6.06.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    (NSC): BofA Merrill jumps on the wagon, cuts Norfolk to neutral from buy.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Another upstanding duo assisting in the art of most timely fire calling to maximize returns.

     

    PS Their returns.
    25 Oct 2012, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    (F) Ford has big issues in Europe

     

    TheStreet: Ford Moves to Fix Europe
    http://bit.ly/RlzJHx

     

    "Despite the cutbacks, Ford continues to plan to introduce 15 global vehicles"

     

    "and the introduction of the Mustang in Europe." ????!!!!!!

     

    "Ford also is moving to reduce vehicle inventory at its European dealerships, utilizing recent improvements in vehicle logistics and IT systems that have sped up the order-to-delivery process. Also, the company plans reduced marketing, including a halt to participation in the FIA World Rally Championship as a factory team after the 2012 season."

     

    Yahoo[AP] : http://yhoo.it/SkzMoi

     

    "Ford cutting 1,500 UK jobs and closing plant as losses in Europe seen exceeding $1.5 billion"

     

    "Sales are down as the region's economic crisis hurts demand from households and businesses."

     

    "Ford's sales were down 14.9 percent in September compared with a year ago, worse than the 10.8 percent fall for all European vehicle brands, according to Acea, the European carmakers' association."

     

    Yahoo[Reuters]: "Ford axes British van plant to stem Europe losses"

     

    http://yhoo.it/SkzMos

     

    "Analysts said the speed of the announcements showed Ford was tackling the problem of over-capacity in Europe head-on, while other companies appeared to dither."

     

    "With GM Europe you always wonder what's going on - it looks like they are still bogged down in deciding what to do," London-based UBS analyst Philippe Houchois said.

     

    "This means all production for the Transit van will move to Turkey."
    25 Oct 2012, 09:41 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    WTB, Europe has a significant over capacity problem. Now that someone has pulled the plug and rationalized capacity the cat is out of the bag. I read an article about a month or two ago where BMW in some areas was turning new cars into used cars and selling them at significant discounts, They were doing this to disguise the fact they were heavily discounting new cars.

     

    Anyway, GM and Peugeot Citroen are all but married in Europe. This will be do to gain scale on their platforms and close final assy plants.

     

    http://bit.ly/RlJzcn
    25 Oct 2012, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    Some notes of my own, being a ford site mod...

     

    Introduction of the Mustang to the European market is long overdue. Thousands of Mustangs are imported every year, at great expense, by custom shops. Mustangs have a cult following throughout Europe, and I suspect will do very well for Ford. It is also a unique model with little direct competition (none in the european Ford lineup).

     

    Ford's problems in europe really are disproportionately due to their prior success with commercial vehicle manufacturing. Much of their overall market share was from the sale of vehicles to the commercial sector, which is hard hit by the new recession sweeping Europe. Shutting down the Transit van plant in the UK is a direct result and looks like a good decision. The Transits we see here in the US already come from Turkey.
    25 Oct 2012, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • Poul Brandt
    , contributor
    Comments (278) | Send Message
     
    Ford in Europe

     

    Funny there are absolutely no references to improving quality.

     

    One of the factors I (and many others) look at when buying a new car is how often does it actually break down.

     

    For this there is a statistic made by ADAC in Germany who responds to cars that break down on the road and need help. It is based on more than 4 million service calls per year. The statistics takes into account how many cars of each type is in service etc.

     

    In the lower middle class of cars there are 28 car models.
    Of these Ford is no 20 and 21. Indicating an inability to make quality cars (from this perspective).

     

    It should be mentioned that for the smaller car categories Ford has made significant improvements the last years.

     

    http://tinyurl.com/c5k...
    25 Oct 2012, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    Poul,
    Wouldn't that statistic be influenced by how many of the product there was on the road? Maybe they already included that calculation. If they did I find the study fascinating.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:27 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    Poul,
    Here is a link to a guy that has put years of the ADAC studies into one spreadsheet.

     

    http://bit.ly/TIFvRV

     

    For those who haven't googled ADAC yet, they are the AAA motor club of Europe.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:37 PM Reply Like
  • Poul Brandt
    , contributor
    Comments (278) | Send Message
     
    Futurist

     

    That is included in the calculation.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Poul. Very meaningful ( I should have known the Germans would be exact) study. I suspect it is relied upon for buying decisions, much like the U.S. JD Powers studies and the Consumer Reports issued each year.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:47 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    LOL, we see this sort of comparison all the time, Poul.

     

    My takeaway is that I would expect a $36,000 Mercedes to be a little more dependable than a $18,000 Ford (that btw is the difference between the Mercedes B type starting price and the Focus price).

     

    In general terms, Ford's market and reliability performance is comparable to the cars priced near it. I was surprised that it did as well as it did given the competition in Germany. Those light green ratings ("good" vs a dark green "excellent" I suppose) were interesting, the last time I looked over those ratings for Germany was years ago and Ford was doing much worse then...

     

    As for improving quality, this sort of manufacturing has evolved into a highly automated commodity vs the skilled labor industry it was a few decades back. Design and price target control, while the variables like quality have been highly tweaked until they squeak up against their respective cost barriers.

     

    As someone who owns both a high end Mercedes and a Ford (Mustang, as a matter of fact), I suspect I am a member in a small group here. My Mercedes requires maintenance and parts which cost approximately twice the same maintenance for my Ford - but then again, I expect those parts and the car to be more luxurious and last longer than the Ford, too.

     

    Studies which ignore these factors prove the point that, if you are very fortunate, you do, sometimes, get what you pay for.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:53 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    Could this be the 3rd party that does the validation testing for BMW?
    http://bit.ly/RXR73O
    25 Oct 2012, 09:48 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2302) | Send Message
     
    Very possible.

     

    Google translated from elektrische analyse page: http://bit.ly/RlBg05

     

    Extensive electrical analysis

     

    The quality of batteries results from the interaction of many factors. They are individually testable and their interaction can be evaluated. we apply this to standard or special test procedures specified by the customer, such as:

     

    Detecting the input state
    (electrical and mechanical)
    Implementation of power measurements according to your
    requirements or standards set
    (DIN, EN, IEC, factory standards)
    Capacitance, high current, cycles / life tests,
    etc.
    Use of the latest computer-controlled test equipment
    (see Technology / Equipment )

     

    Documentation of the results: The results are as detailed log with graph and tables made ​​available in print or electronic form.
    25 Oct 2012, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Now we're talkin'! Citadel jumps over ATDF on the bid with 101K @ $0.287 at 9:55:57. If ATDF wants to play their games today they *might* have to get serious on bids.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Now Citadel cuts back to 21K @ $0.288.

     

    But what I've learned is that 101K $0.287 is likely still there - someone trading through CDEL just jumped ahead and we're only shown the top at each MM on L2. Advantage: market-makers.

     

    HardToLove
    EDIT: Yep! At 10:13:04, the $0.288x21K is withdrawn and the $0.287x101K is back on top from CDEL.
    25 Oct 2012, 10:08 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Now we're talkin' 2: for once ATDF doesn't walk the best offer down.

     

    Over an hour in and only 2,833 shares traded in 2 trades.

     

    But with both NITE and UBSS offering at .30, could be a lot of supply there.

     

    Also approaching end of month ... could be some final losing stock dumping in the next few days if we really do have a couple of "Mini-Mes" playing.

     

    Come on NSC ... let's see NS-999 out in the elements!

     

    And come on UL testing lab (whoever you are) ... we really need that certification announcement to give us a little upward momentum.

     

    I know TG is really hoping for something exciting to talk about on the next conference call ... (Nov 15 last year)
    25 Oct 2012, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    It's my SuperPower! Talk about ATDF not walking down best offer, and Voila!

     

    10K @ .2949

     

    10,750 sold at .2950 ... wasn't watching, but I guess that went to a different patron of ATDF.

     

    One day I pledge to use by power for good ...
    25 Oct 2012, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Well, you've started something - now ETRF comes on the ask at $0.29 and gets 1K moved. And then somebody casts a 200 share lure @ $0.287 (probably CDEL who's on the bid at that price w/100K now).

     

    Now the question is: is $0.003 spread too big for some of the CDEL orders to jump the "chasm" and buy at $0.29? 1K already did it. I love a parade, I love a parade, ...

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    LT sent me a link to a street.com article on (AONE) that mentions John's stuff too. Got a couple good links in there too.

     

    http://bit.ly/RlCmZT

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Schoen ein bisschen Deutsch zu lesen!
    25 Oct 2012, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I worked with a mechanic from a company called ATS out of Canada moving a large manufacturing complex from the US to Mexico. He shared a story about a technical meeting he had with a group in the Czech Republic. They spoke initially and decided that the meeting should be held in English. Since the group from the Czech Republic's English was poor it took them approximately 3 times longer to conclude the event than he'd hoped. As he was exiting he overheard them all talking in German! He went over and they shared a laugh. He had no idea how they hadn't decided to ask about other possible languages up front as the mechanic from ATS's first name was Wolfgang! LOL
    25 Oct 2012, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    ATDF starts today's dance, finally jumping to head of the ask with 25Kx$0.295 at 11:15:20.

     

    Snagged some too.

     

    11.55K in two trades. Now ask is 10Kx$0.2949 from ATDF but that $295 with remaining 14K or so is probably still there and hidden.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Lol, when I first moved to Germany as a student, my German was terrible and we only spoke in English. After about four months and some of my English study abroad friends going home, I told my German friends (and g/f at the time) speaking English was over.

     

    Speaking only German with the g/f made a world of difference.
    25 Oct 2012, 11:28 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Ooh la la!
    25 Oct 2012, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    the best way to learn any language is horizontal
    25 Oct 2012, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4161) | Send Message
     
    my French friends say a variation of that, "the best way to learn a language is by pillow talk"...
    25 Oct 2012, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Maybe, but the resulting vocabulary is so limited! But it's a good "learning experience".

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    Quick question to those that have Level II. What are you seeing on the bid at $0.32 & at $0.28?
    25 Oct 2012, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    >Drich:
    ETRF 35.7K@.28 BID

     

    No one showing offer at .32, so if you are, someone else served by your market maker is offering better

     

    Any bid at .32 would be immediately filled as there are many offers well below that (unless there's some weird all or none thing happening that I don't understand, though I would think the market maker would take it and fill orders in pieces unless we're talking really really huge)
    25 Oct 2012, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >wtblanchard ... Thanks. I was just wondering because where I am I can't see Level II right now. A friend & I are just price fishing right now over the phone. It seems that both bids at those strikes that I know are there aren't showing & not being filled. Makes a person wonder. They are both AON and what some would think are "good" size. We will leave them there for awhile to see what happens.
    25 Oct 2012, 12:22 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    WTB, That's interesting because I'm seeing 100k total bid at 0.287 USD. Don't have level 2.
    25 Oct 2012, 12:31 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    >ID ... yes, that is (and was) the best bid
    CDEL 100K @ .287

     

    I took DRich's question literally ...

     

    BTW, ATDF backed their offer back to 25K @ .30,
    leaving ETRF 10K @ .29 as best
    25 Oct 2012, 12:36 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Odd, I am too. We're really bored today so I wonder if playing with the bids has any effect.
    25 Oct 2012, 12:39 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    And now that 100K offer at .287 was filled!

     

    New best offers
    ATDF 5K @ .2823
    CDEL 50.6K @ .28
    ETRF 35.7K at .28
    PERT 5K @ .27
    25 Oct 2012, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Beats me. Seems the last few days the hot spot for transactions seems to be the upper 0.28 range. As we just saw with the 100k transaction.

     

    These industrial sector stocks working on advanced rail/automotive just don't have the opportunity to have many news events. Then you couple up that fact with it being a penny and it really gets hard. It's like waiting for word from the Skunk Works.
    25 Oct 2012, 12:50 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    Here's another interesting german company:
    http://bit.ly/TIdRUX

     

    Remember the BMW-Ford-Moll presentation? It is a privately held company. Interestingly neither Ford nor BMW are listed as references:
    http://bit.ly/S8UgRW

     

    I can perfectly imagine Moll building the batteries with Axion electrodes for BMW.
    25 Oct 2012, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    f-kru, I was thinking the same thing. I looked extensively around the internet for any signs of collaboration. Found nothing. Of coarse in industry this means nothing other than I couldn't find any signs of a possibility!
    25 Oct 2012, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    Maybe they all just signed the same NDA ;-)
    25 Oct 2012, 12:30 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    f-kru, You can't bet on the same one but you can bet on NDA's for sure. For Axionista's it means No Data Available. Sigh.

     

    I guess we just continue to look at Axion's data, look at what the various applications need, scan available technologies with their respective costs and then fill in the gaps. Makes the heart race a little with anticipation.
    25 Oct 2012, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (991) | Send Message
     
    THE SCOOP ON START-STOP
    http://bit.ly/VrfA2r

     

    Soriana Stern
    Director of Marketing at Energy Squad
    (Rosewater dealer-Residential Energy Hub-ES and RW and Brand Partner)
    25 Oct 2012, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (739) | Send Message
     
    Nice puff piece but really, yawnnnnnn!

     

    We the jaded/informed hope for meat not fluff!

     

    Thanks for your diligence!
    25 Oct 2012, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (991) | Send Message
     
    AiB

     

    A little here, a little there...yawn is good while watching the paint dry.
    I emailed the author about the AXPW connection.
    She's a young kid...maybe she can expand her marketing hat beyond the Energy Squad products since she wrote about SS.

     

    I think most might agree the "meat" has to emanate from AXPW re a hard announcement...BMW, NS et al.
    Timing is everything.
    25 Oct 2012, 01:03 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Yall remember that 100K in four trades that went at average price of $0.2809 on 10/23? Well, Citadel customer might have just flipped it for for $606.41 profit, less fees (ETrade would be $9.99 * 2) at 12:40:54.

     

    Ruined a really nicely developing buy:sell! :-((

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 12:50 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... Flipping for less than 1%? That breaks the norm for risk/reward rules. We did the same thing in oil today. Well, I guess there are people more bored than our little trading cartel here is Texas.
    25 Oct 2012, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    DRich: If I could do $600+ reliably a couple times a week I would be happy.

     

    Different strokes and all that.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... Key word there .... "reliably". One I would not put in the same sentence with Axion. Maybe it's just me.
    25 Oct 2012, 02:30 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    DRich: it's not just you. I'm thinking that might be one of the reasons that seller, *if* it was the person that bought the 100K 10/23, might have exited today. Takes risk to zero and ready to play another day.

     

    There are trades I've made in other stocks that I took less than planned because it started to look dicey and I rationalized that taking what I made and having no risk left was justified under the conditions I could see then.

     

    And I've learned a couple times that not following that instinct can cost me.

     

    The hard part, for me, is when to trust that instinct and when suppress it.

     

    Charts spend their fair share of time lying, ISTM.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 02:45 PM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (331) | Send Message
     
    That 100K buy at .287 was me... From a TDAmeritrade account: I would have thought from prior discussion that MM would have been ATDF, surprises me it was CDEL which I'd never heard of. I was wondering who I might induce to sell to me - interesting that it may have been a flipper from last week for lunch money profit...
    25 Oct 2012, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Welcome aboard Rugged!
    25 Oct 2012, 01:08 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    RuggedDC: CDEL is Citadel. They're big. Used to own a big stake in ETrade and handled their trades, through a deal, until a big uproar about it was raised, IIRC.

     

    Congrats on getting a nice chunk at a great price!

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 01:11 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2893) | Send Message
     
    Thank you for sharing Rugged =)

     

    Also we should note that there was NO double count on that trade as it only hit the tape at 12:40pm est as 100k share order. My own orders have appeared in a similar way.

     

    It kind of makes one wonder when there is double count and when there isn't (i.e. does the MM hold inventory). Also it shows how hard it is to try to decipher if the trading we are seeing is flipping or retail longs new to the story.

     

    I hope for more of the latter.
    25 Oct 2012, 07:37 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Bazooka: IMO, the only time we should have double counts, now that computerized matching and NBBO presentation is available, is if the MMs are accumulating to satisfy a big order (likely an all-or-none too) and/or from a favored customer that the MM feels *must* be satisfied so they don't lose their business.

     

    This is a change from the days when "specialists" had to maintain a working inventory to make their market and be able to provide liquidity. They had much more risk than what they must bear now since they can be market-neutral most of the time now.

     

    IMO, the number of double counts, sans any large buyers/sellers in for a long term here, is now inconsequential.

     

    I'm guessing when there was a lot of certificate conversion, which JP has detailed, the double count was a bit more likely, but I don't have any guess as to how much.

     

    If some "biggies" get interested and we see sustained high volumes there are likely to be short periods when double transactions constitute a significant portion of any (several?) days' volume. But I think they'll now be "blips" in the longer-term volume considerations.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 08:53 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2893) | Send Message
     
    HTL based on your analysis of things, how much do you think the volume for the past year is double-counted?

     

    Would you say that double count only happened 25% of the time or 50%+ etc.

     

    I had presumed that this years volume really reflected almost twice the actual interest in the stock but now I wonder if more often than not those 300k-600k days actually reflected "true" volume (i.e. 300k/day at .33 meant there was hundred thousand dollars of buying for that day).
    26 Oct 2012, 05:49 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Bazoooka: I have no way to form any reasonable estimate on that.

     

    HardToLove
    27 Oct 2012, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (331) | Send Message
     
    Thanks so much, John.

     

    I should add that the way I view AXPW is that you're buying a $1Million asset for under $30K (should it get to $10/share - a $1B market cap (I dream...)).
    25 Oct 2012, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (739) | Send Message
     
    You and the rest of us!
    25 Oct 2012, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    RuggedDC: Nice purchase! You got 100,000 shares for not much more than I got 20,000 shares (10,000 @ $1.20 and 10,000 @ $1.14).

     

    ####

     

    Best name so far for this "monster" storm coming?

     

    Frankenstorm!
    25 Oct 2012, 01:35 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2144) | Send Message
     
    Maya,
    Don't you wish you had a Power Cube?
    25 Oct 2012, 01:36 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    Still: I'd rather have $45,000 to buy another 150,000 shares of Axion. Then when Axion gets to a buck, I could buy three Power Cubes.
    25 Oct 2012, 02:10 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (415) | Send Message
     
    An extra $45K of stock purchase will not affect the market cap nearly as dramatically as an end-user hub sale. You can pay for the hub by selling some shares after the installation. Just don't announce that the sale is going to an investor.

     

    How does the old razor ad go: "I liked the company so much I bought the product"
    25 Oct 2012, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1777) | Send Message
     
    Maya,
    I saw the Frankenstorm stuff. Graphically shows how geographical distance makes all the difference. Down here in NC, the temp is up close to 80 and they are talking about us getting a little rain as the storm moves up the coast. Up there by you...Frankenstorm!
    25 Oct 2012, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    I'm betting the discharge profile looks like that of an asymmetric storage device I've heard about. Just can't remember where? ;)

     

    Amazing New Grid-Scale Battery Has Electrodes That Don’t Degrade

     

    http://bit.ly/TImQ8O
    25 Oct 2012, 01:44 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (352) | Send Message
     
    It's interesting the cell uses K rather than Li to carry current. The linked abstract notes that the solvated K+ ion is actually smaller than Li+ (even though it's lower on the periodic table) and therefore diffuses faster.
    25 Oct 2012, 06:00 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Renzo, I got a kick out of the statements about the electrodes.

     

    Jeez, a cheap and commercially available anode made of activated carbon with a conductive polymer. I don't know what those guys at Axion have been working on all these years when they're "Blue Light Specials" at Kmart.

     

    Academia! It's so easy a cave man can do it.

     

    "By coating the negatively charged cathode in copper hexacyanoferrate and using an anode made of activated carbon and a conductive polymer - compounds that allow electricity-carrying ions to move easily in and out - the team were able to build a prototype battery with electrodes that didn't lose capacity over time."

     

    "The researchers write that their battery's components are cheap and commercially available."
    25 Oct 2012, 06:47 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    "Academia! It's so easy a cave man can do it."

     

    Uh-oh. Insulting Metro's relatives is bound to spark some angst!

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 06:59 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (352) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco, I knew what you were getting at with the "novel" carbon electrode they were discussing but the reformed chemist in me was surprised about the Stokes radius discussion. (http://bit.ly/SB4EiB) Sorry if it came off as thick.

     

    I wonder if the carbon electrode of their Prussian blue battery would infringe on Axion's patents?
    25 Oct 2012, 07:01 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Renzo, No, I understand where you're coming from. Your background would have you looking at the contents from a different perspective as well for sure.

     

    Thanks for that perspective and the link. We're fortunate to have such of a diverse talented group here to point out different things and to help those not educated/working in their respective fields to understand some of this information better.
    25 Oct 2012, 07:34 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    HTL, Given Metro's ability to offer us a smile and a chuckle on occasion I must admit to doing a little fishing with that one!
    25 Oct 2012, 07:37 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2302) | Send Message
     
    "...the battery's key advantage is its electrodes, which can run for a thousand charge cycles without degrading."

     

    Wow. A thousand cycles. What is the PbC up to now? Was it 2500 complete discharge cycles at last publication, and probably 100k shallow cycles? Refresh my memory, those who have been keeping track.
    25 Oct 2012, 09:31 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin: my memory is same as yours.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 08:55 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Related/Derived:

     

    "Stanford's battery-life research steps into economy class October 25, 2012 by Nancy Owano (Phys.org)—Looking for better battery designs and solutions is a priority pursuit for many scientists, and the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program is always on the lookout for worthy contributions. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, BATT is a leader in U.S. research in battery solutions for electric vehicles. They have not missed the fact that Prof. Yi Cui, Associate Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University, has been leading a team that is coming up with new answers for energy storage.

     

    http://bit.ly/VNaraY
    26 Oct 2012, 11:44 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, HTL
    Your comment went right over the low-sloping forehead.
    26 Oct 2012, 03:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Darn, My best Shakespeare vintage lure and barely a bite.

     

    You're off a little today Metro. Dog been drinking too much at night?

     

    Or is the hanging head and the barely audible tune another rendition of the Axionista blues. "My darn dog left me and and my papers done shrunk. Hmmmmm...."
    26 Oct 2012, 03:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    For those of us that can't imagine not having electric available.

     

    A Billion People in the Dark

     

    http://bit.ly/TIovez
    25 Oct 2012, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1375) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, iindelco. This is the kind of thing that gets me excited but the challenges are big.

     

    Noone should miss the section on batteries!
    "Microgrids face another looming problem, this one technical. Solar panels and diesel generators can last for decades, but the batteries that make them possible fail much more quickly. "With a microgrid, you typically need an energy storage system that, with current technology, you have to replace every three or five or seven years. That's a huge capital cost," says Katherine Steel, an MIT-trained engineer who heads the World Bank's Lighting Africa program. If replacement batteries are not in the budget, the effective lifetime of the microgrid is limited to only a few years.

     

    According to OPS, lead-acid batteries keep the price of microgrids relatively high not only because they need to be replaced frequently but because they are so expensive that microgrid designers lean heavily on diesel generation to provide electricity through the night. It is cheaper to run diesel generators than to add enough solar panels and batteries to provide power around the clock. To overcome this problem, OPS is now testing a battery from Aquion, a Carnegie Mellon University spinout in Pittsburgh; it could nearly eliminate the need for diesel in microgrids, lowering emissions and greatly reducing operating costs."
    25 Oct 2012, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Here's an informative video off of Aquion's site:

     

    http://bit.ly/RZPsLk

     

    Their name seems to be an amalgam of "aqua" and "ion" as their chemistry revolves around neutral pH water and sodium sulfite electrolyte.
    25 Oct 2012, 10:34 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Wonder how Enders made out.

     

    http://conta.cc/PSQGw0

     

    http://bit.ly/Rhjo8b
    25 Oct 2012, 03:03 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Seems he's making out pretty well ...

     

    Paris .... San Diego ...

     

    :-)

     

    Wonder if he extended his stay till Sandy makes up her mind?
    25 Oct 2012, 03:08 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    Seems to me Vani is getting some sales support this Fall.
    25 Oct 2012, 03:17 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    "Wonder if he extended his stay till Sandy makes up her mind?"

     

    Always torn. Avoid it or protect the home front.

     

    I remember this one. Moved the family to the side of the house with the least tree exposure. Up all night to the sound of trees falling over and branches snapping off. Large crashes like a china cabinet tipping over every few minutes. Really bizarre.

     

    http://on.rocne.ws/TDS5Yl
    25 Oct 2012, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1777) | Send Message
     
    We had a similar storm here in NC about 10 years ago. Lost power for over a week. All night long you would hear the pine trees snap and the tops crashing to the ground. It sounded like gunshots all night long. I lost one tree in the backyard of my old house. Just missed crashing through the living room windows. They went through and mulched all the trees and put them in this big vacant lot. The final result was a pill of mulch about 1/2 the size of a football field and about 8 ft high. The problem that year was also that it had been a mild fall/early winter, so a lot of the trees still had their leaves. Made the tops of the trees even heavier when all that surface area was covered in ice.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:02 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1041) | Send Message
     
    Ugh. Last speaker of last of conference. worst position ever...

     

    They all can't be winners. Good news is its on a Thursday and not ending on Friday which would be worse.
    25 Oct 2012, 04:45 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    mrholty, You read my mind!

     

    I figured he'd be fine given the day as you suggest. Phew!! ;)
    25 Oct 2012, 06:23 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (285) | Send Message
     
    "Wonder how Enders made out."

     

    Hopefully, like a boss! :)
    26 Oct 2012, 09:21 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Regarding NSC Engine comments on the earnings release:

     

    "It has also stored 200 locomotives it owns and returned 160 less-efficient leased locomotives"

     

    Asked my Altoona contact for comment (regarding what's public knowledge)

     

    We presently have 140 engines from the active roster stored. Many of these engines that are considered stored are in the shops for upgrade or overhaul, others are long term stored. 999 would be considered stored for what it's worth. http://www.nsdash9.com is a good source for detailed information on the NS engine fleet.
    25 Oct 2012, 03:17 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (352) | Send Message
     
    Here's another story on the costs of green energy pollution on the grid. German wind and solar subsidy costs in 2013 will be 5-times higher than predicted in 2009.

     

    (http://bit.ly/TiXnXr)
    25 Oct 2012, 06:27 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Renzo: What? Government instituted, mandated, managed and ... "stuff" had "cost overruns"? Who woulda thunk it?

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 07:03 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (352) | Send Message
     
    I wonder if stories like this will eventually affect Lux's forecast of 185GWh grid storage needed by 2017 (per JP's April 2012 article). You have to think that government's will be forced to scale back their mandates as the true costs are revealed. This still leaves Axion in a great position for a significant portion of a still-very-large market based on PbC's cost and performance.

     

    A good example of how quickly things change (from the article):

     

    "Many participants in the lithium-ion battery sector are developing and demonstrating grid-scale energy storage products. To date, the highest profile player has been A123 Systems (AONE), which has shipped over 90 MW of storage systems for ancillary services and renewables integration. While Johnson Controls (JCI) has been quiet about its plans to package and sell lithium-ion batteries for stationary applications, I have to believe the global footprint and sterling reputation of its building efficiency unit will make it a formidable competitor in the commercial markets."
    (http://bit.ly/Tj2hDR)

     

    Note the prescient forecast of JCI getting involved. Who'd have guessed how that would happen?
    25 Oct 2012, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    10/25/2012: (AXPW) EOD stuff partially copied from instablog (up in the A.M.).
    # Trds: 21, MinTrSz: 200, MaxTrSz: 100000, Vol 189057, AvTrSz: 9003
    Min. Pr: 0.2870, Max Pr: 0.3000, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.2912
    # Buys, Shares: 17 83077, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.2963
    # Sells, Shares: 4 105980, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.2872
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:1.28 (43.94% “buys”), DlyShts 16124 (8.53%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 15.21%

     

    I want to mention one outlier that was big enough to skew results in several areas, a 100K “sell” at $0.287, but which couldn't completely overcome some apparent bullishness at these price levels. I removed that trade and the change was absolutely ridiculous in its effect: think of a buy:sell around 16:1, the effect on VWAP, etc. There's enough data above for you to calculate anything you're interested in. Anyway, even with that trade notice that our “buys” improved from yesterdays 42.6% (1:1.35) and regardless of a drop in short sales percentage (low percentage with volume this low suggests market-makers had some incoming cheap shares to sell). Speaking of which ...

     

    I'm omitting the discussion of it in the APC as I suspect it has become a boring topic here. It's in my instablog though.

     

    Last thing regarding the 100K trade: without it our average trades size was around 4.4K, still low and right around yesterday's 4.6K. So the market-makers are apparently dealing with much smaller average order sizes, low volume and (as we observed today and many other days) significant spreads between the bid and ask for extended periods. If it wasn't for ATDF jumping in front all the time, we might have almost no volume at all. I guess we ought to be thankful they're in even if we hate what they do.

     

    My new inflection points stuff all weakened, except the 10-day which remains above 0 at 103.82. But without support from any of the other periods and no suggestion from any other source of anything but a sideways move at the moment, I wouldn't be making any moves here.

     

    Most other things are status quo: narrowing trading range, low volume, buy:sell hanging in the normal areas. Nothings really changed on the traditional TA front either.

     

    The short sales and “Dly Sht % of 'sells'” stuff is omitted from the concentrator.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Oct 2012, 07:08 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    I don't mean to be rude, and I certainly appreciate the time you invest and your willingness to share, but if you're going to keep taking trades out of your analysis on a fairly regular basis, perhaps you should consider tracking medians or something other than averages!

     

    Or perhaps add or switch to more of a focus on weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly charts?

     

    I was under the impression that TA loses its effectiveness if you don't have a certain level of volume. Maybe you need longer periods in a OTC-BB stock like AXPW to reach really solid conclusions?

     

    Is it possible we may miss the "big" picture by focusing a little too much of your valuable time on the day to day?

     

    Again, not trying to be rude ... just a little challenge/food for thought (or possibly an educational moment for me :-) )

     

    "Never mistake activity for achievement." - John Wooden
    26 Oct 2012, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    "keep taking trades out of your analysis on a fairly regular basis"

     

    ?? I leave all trades in the stats I report and only mention exceptional ones and what effect would be if they were discounted.

     

    AFAICT, it's just another factor that folks can consider when trying to asses the action that is seen.

     

    As to day-to-day vs. longer term, I do this to try and educate myself on the workings of markets which I believe are biased against our success. I share only so that others with similar interest may have access to all that I can gather and my thoughts so that they can be critiqued within the context and POV of each person with an interest.

     

    I have offered in the past and offer again to not post here. It would save me time I could devote to other things.

     

    As to the value, to me, of longer term, I can't learn the details that I seek with a "macro view".

     

    "Never mistake activity for achievement."

     

    What *I* believe I have achieved may not be achievement to others.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 10:31 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    HTL, I am NOT suggesting you stop posting here!

     

    Just playing a little devil's advocate. Sorry .. it's what I do.

     

    BTW, I could certainly apply that Wooden quote to myself! I think it became popular because many folks see it in parts of their lives.

     

    I think our challenge in this information overload world (and often in composition) is to pare things back to the essence if possible. (maybe with footnotes :-) )

     

    Think of it as Unix v. Windows? :-)
    26 Oct 2012, 10:45 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2302) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    Please continue to do what you do so well.

     

    While I cannot always penetrate the statistical density of your analysis, I do appreciate the tentative conclusions you draw as one more iota of information to illuminate our way in a risky and murky world.
    26 Oct 2012, 11:04 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    No apology is need. We all have different perspectives and needs.

     

    "Think of it as Unix v. Windows?"

     

    UNIX: "Do one thing and do it well". That embodied the essence of a "building block" approach to the operating system, utilities and user applications. It got lost in Linux. But Kernighan and Ritchie and the other Bell Labs folks were really bright guys.

     

    That applies to my efforts in regard to answering the question "Why is this stock behaving the way it is, against all (apparent) logic?". Stocks in general, not Axion specifically.

     

    My feeling is that if I understand how and why things are done the way they are, my ability to better profit may be enhanced. As I mentioned before, by understanding the cam I understand why valves in an engine do what they do.

     

    ISTM the markets, because of the complexity, *may* need to be understood to a greater depth than we normally obtain if we are to avoid being manipulated by those that operate the various components of the market. I know their goal is *not* to offer a fair and level market, but to move money from our pockets to theirs. And history strongly suggests that they will apply all means, legal and otherwise that they believe they can get away with, to do so.

     

    So that leads to the "do one thing ...", which in this case for me is understand how it works. If my understanding becomes sufficient, I may then build on that.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2144) | Send Message
     
    HTL,
    Do unto them before......
    Yeah, go for it. ;-)
    26 Oct 2012, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2893) | Send Message
     
    HTL, a lot of us read what you write and I think you know that. I'm amazed at the things you've uncovered by watching everything so close. I don't always agree with you but I'm always interested in reading your interpretations.
    26 Oct 2012, 03:58 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (991) | Send Message
     
    SMartin
    "HTL,

     

    Please continue to do what you do so well. "

     

    Agreed.
    26 Oct 2012, 07:00 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    HTL, occasionally, you get a day like today that may help you, JP and anyone else who cares add to the hard data on what the FINRA shorts mean, in that you can precisely account for the trades that produced the FINRA number. The 16,124 total shares = two trades: 10,374 at $.2900 at 12:51:26 + 5,750 at $0.2950 at 11:21:15. In addition, the 100k shares sold to DC did not appear in the short number, nor any of the other trades, for whatever that's worth.
    25 Oct 2012, 07:36 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2893) | Send Message
     
    Agreed, very rarely do we got a low volume day and identifiable market participants all at the same time.
    25 Oct 2012, 08:17 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    MrI: The important one, to me, is that the 100K "sell" did not produce a short sale. Unfortunately we don't have any way to tell if the shares came from a market-maker or was an intra-broker or inter-broker trade.

     

    My best *guess* is it was an MM source because we can see (vol in thousands):
    Date. Sht VWAP
    10/17 301 0.3219
    10/18 135 0.3004
    10/19 53 0.2962
    10/22 137 0.2919
    10/23 35 0.2866
    10/24 31 0.2881

     

    ~436K shorted above $0.30 with lots of attractive "covering buy" opportunities after the 18th. If that's what's happening, it accounts for the choppy nature of the short sale *percentages*, especially on low-volume days.

     

    Interesting about the two trades is that their VWAP was $0.2918, above the day's $0.2912, and opportunities to cover below that price occurred for only 8,280 shares subsequent to the second trade. If the volumes were larger, we could look for some possible effect in today's action. But at this level, I don't think we could detect any potential action related to those trades.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Carlos, this one is for you.

     

    An Electrical Energy Storage Presentation from the Catalonia Institute for Energy Research & Universitat de Barcelona.

     

    (in English)

     

    http://bit.ly/TdeVQc
    25 Oct 2012, 07:38 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    Stephan,
    Its a shame that the PbC couldn't be listed side by side with the others. The detail in this presentation was good. Talks about the potential for Li-Air but realistically shows that it isn't ready for prime time. I like the fact that ZBB submitted one of the photos. Shows that the little company is known by some big players.
    26 Oct 2012, 07:58 AM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (799) | Send Message
     
    Hi, Stefan Moroney:

     

    Por favor en Español.

     

    Gracias-Carlos.
    26 Oct 2012, 07:21 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Alstom an interesting company to follow.

     

    (though as retired Lucent, maybe it's just what they do with the "O" :-) )

     

    "25/10/2012
    Alstom has invested an additional US$40m in the American company BrightSource Energy, Inc to reinforce its partnership with the pioneering solar power company, which is a leader in the concentrated solar thermal tower technology."

     

    http://bit.ly/R64iyM

     

    "Both companies have also decided to expand their geographic partnerships to India and Australia, where solar conditions best suit BrightSource’s tower technology and where Alstom has a strong track record in engineering and construction of power plants. Previously, the companies announced partnerships in the Mediterranean Ring and Africa."
    26 Oct 2012, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'm back home now after a couple fascinating days at Batteries 2012. One of the biggest surprises for me was that German government agencies were there in force. Their lead economic development agency, Germany Trade Invest was the sponsor of the Conference dinner and there were representatives from a half dozen different States. I've uploaded the GTI presentation to my Dropbox for those who are interested in understanding the issues the Germans are facing with a proliferation of small solar installations.

     

    http://bit.ly/S0mavL

     

    I managed to snag about an hour of one on one time with Ted Miller, Ford's Senior Manager of Energy Storage Strategy and Research. While I promised to keep that particular conversation off the record, it's safe to say that we didn't disagree on anything.

     

    The most fun was the couple hours I spent with the strategic planning group of one of the top lithium-ion battery manufacturers in the world that's basically given up hope on EVs and wants to more closely evaluate other markets. With a bit of luck that one may turn into a consulting gig.
    26 Oct 2012, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Is there a Frequency Regulation market like FERC 755 developing in Germany/Europe?

     

    Behind the meter "Powercube" like market?

     

    Do you think if Axion partnered with say Moll primarily for BMW that they might have a shot at Powercube like sales, or would they have no chance without signing up with someone like Siemens, Alstom, ABB, etc?

     

    Are there small quick moving inverter companies over there that understand European standards like Indy Power Systems???, Dynapower, or Princeton Power do here?
    26 Oct 2012, 10:31 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Without reading German, I can't begin to answer detailed questions like those. The overview from 50,000 feet is easy enough to pass on in the form it comes to me, but I really don't know enough to interpret.
    26 Oct 2012, 10:35 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    You were gone? - kidding, welcome back...
    26 Oct 2012, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I seem to be having some problems with the Dropbox link. Let's see if this works better.

     

    http://bit.ly/U1YB5Y

     

    That works.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:11 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Maybe I will have to try from another computer b/c I still can't get it.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    I got "Connection reset" when I tried. But the original worked when I looked ...

     

    Clicking the original now gives the same "reset".

     

    Might be a server or name server problem?

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    JP: Doesn't work for me, either.

     

    Great work at the battery conference!
    26 Oct 2012, 12:17 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >JP ... Both links work fine for me.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    Strange. Now it works, Hiccup...
    26 Oct 2012, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    " http://bit.ly/U1YB5Y "

     

    Worked for me.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    Dropbox along with other cloud providers had downtimes today. Maybe related to the storm. Amazon's EC2 was taken out by a storm earlier this week.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I ended up deleting the first file, so you want to be sure to use this link.

     

    http://bit.ly/U1YB5Y
    26 Oct 2012, 12:43 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    That worked just fine.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 12:44 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    works for me too!
    26 Oct 2012, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Would that the USA had a plan like this in place instead of throwing more billions at the fossil fuel industry and fantasizing about "clean coal."
    26 Oct 2012, 04:11 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    The problem with that plan Billa is the Germans now have a critically frangible grid and one cold winter will take it down. Something tells me that today's ever so green German citizens will be less so once they spend a few days freezing in the dark. For now their answer is coal, lots of new coal. I expect that answer to change.
    26 Oct 2012, 04:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    "green German citizens "

     

    Maybe they'll become "blue German citizens"

     

    http://bit.ly/TeTD4Q

     

    or

     

    http://bit.ly/Xvtip5

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 04:32 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Some people just have to try it for themselves HTL. But no matter. Putin's got their back.

     

    http://bit.ly/XvvVam
    26 Oct 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    That water's so cold that she's defying gravity as her body refuses to take the plunge! Levitation when it's needed most! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 04:47 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    The problem is getting worse for the German middle class. The surcharge put on the renewable energy is growing faster than the traditional energy sources. So the costs of energy to the middle income person is disapportionate to large energy users. Its complicated and I cant give you the details but I know the bottom line is what I described. I am repeating what I heard a panel of experts on BBC radio discussing.
    26 Oct 2012, 10:11 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    What struck me in the presentation was how widespread homes off the grid seem to be in Germany -- solar panels on every rooftop, so to speak.

     

    That a smart grid is less robust than a dumb one is scary to say the least.
    27 Oct 2012, 10:47 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    The houses are not off the grid, and that's the problem. On warm sunny days each of those houses is a net power generator, until a cloud passes and they all become power users. Come winter, when power is needed the most, the panels spend days as snow and ice collectors, or become useless because of low lying ice fog.

     

    The German mentality is incredibly hard working and thrifty, with a great concern for not disturbing the neighbors. They almost view their solar panels as a civic duty. But so many people trying to do 'the right thing' creates massive unintended consequences in terms of instability.
    28 Oct 2012, 12:57 AM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    I hear you John.

     

    Beyond making houses use energy more efficiently, then -- and that is just a stopgap measure until energy usage maxes out again -- what reality-based alternatives to fossil-fuel-fired centralized electricity generation are there?
    28 Oct 2012, 11:26 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'm hopeful that we'll avoid the temptation to backslide. Houses, cars and commercial buildings are getting more efficient. More importantly people seem to shrinking their 'lifestyle radius' by living closer to work and playing and shopping closer to home. At the same time cleaner fuels like natural gas are getting more plentiful because of improved technology. As a result, oil consumption is down almost 10% from its 2005 peak and CO2 emissions are at a 20 year low. I know whether there are any reality-based alternatives, but I tend to believe that there's a lot of room for reality-based contributions. The hard part will be finding a reasonable balance based on fact instead of emotion.
    29 Oct 2012, 12:20 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    I still hold to the theory that conservation is the next big wave of production. But I have dreamed that dream since 1972.

     

    Is it possible the world has finally caught on with my vision. :-)
    29 Oct 2012, 07:44 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    I just read your latest SA article about "using coal and natural gas as transportation fuels instead of gasoline," and I understand your point.

     

    Are you convinced that wind, solar, tidal, and other energy capture technologies are in principle unable to match the electricity generation capabilities of fossil fuels?

     

    The article we all read last week about tapping deep ocean currents gave me a few minutes of genuine hope, and I am still thinking that might have the potential to be a big part of the mix eventually.
    29 Oct 2012, 08:48 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Futurist,

     

    I listened to a presentation a few months ago about conservation that focused on the question of electricity generation headroom.

     

    The idea discussed was that if devices that use energy were perfectly efficient, the issue of fluctuating demand still has to be addressed.

     

    With overproduction of electricity some is lost, but if production and consumption are perfectly tuned, a spike in demand can crash the system.

     

    I personally am a huge advocate of conservation, but it seems to me that burning fossil fuels to make electricity, even if done sparingly, is a dangerous plan, not least because an ever-growing customer base, even it if uses electricity sparingly, will eventually reach the point where it uses as much electricity as today's customer base is using now.
    29 Oct 2012, 08:57 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    >Billa, The problem with wind and solar is their intermittency. The electrons are green, but the current they feed into the grid is filthy and the cost of abating that pollution is currently passed on to consumers instead of being charged back to the polluters.

     

    http://bit.ly/XKEI7v

     

    With every new solar panel or wind turbine that's added to the system, the intermittency problem gets more severe and costly. The fundamental problem with alternatives other than conventional hydro is that we're trying to convert low quality energy inputs into high quality power outputs - and lots of them. The materials requirements are immense and I'm not wise enough to choose between wiring a wind farm in Napa and wiring an apartment block in Mumbai. That competition for resources is a fundamental problem for all alternatives and it worries me. Hans Rosling did a great job of highlighting the issue in this TED video:

     

    http://bit.ly/Yhg4vj

     

    We might be able to solve the problem with really big and really cheap storage, but there is nothing on the horizon that I see as being big enough or cheap enough. I'm aware of some really cool ideas, but they're completely untested.
    30 Oct 2012, 01:58 AM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    I don't have any flip answers for you. Consuming as much energy as we do is a big problem, and the solution isn't simple.

     

    One thing I am sure of, looking at Hurricane Sandy today and the plethora of environmental issues that confront us, is that if we do not figure out how to wind down CO2 generation in a controlled manner, Mother Nature will crash our civilization for us.

     

    If I am not mistaken, there are some posters on this board who do not believe CO2 is causing global warming. Leaving that issue aside, I wonder how these posters explain ocean acidification and what they propose to do about it.
    30 Oct 2012, 02:46 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'm firmly in the agnostic camp. I don't discount the possibility that humanity is causing problems, but I don't believe anybody has the intellect to understand, much less accurately model, all the complexities of atmospherics and the relationship of our planet with its friendly neighborhood star and the rest of the galaxy. I've seen lots of proof of correlation, but proof of correlation is not proof of causation.

     

    Ultimately I'm a fatalist. I believe the world's population has grown to unsustainable levels and Mother Nature will take things into her own hands. I hope she doesn't decide to do so in a manner that would be personally inconvenient, but that's not something I can control and I know to a certainty that my efforts to clean up my personal environmental footprint will be offset by the actions of others who think light and heat beat freezing in the dark.

     

    I think we're coming into a very ugly time when the demands of emerging economies overwhelm the productive capacity of advanced economies. The IT revolution changed everything and the poor are no longer ignorant. The only path forward I see is minimizing waste in all it's pernicious forms. Plans to increase the waste of metal resources in the name of conserving hydrocarbons that are hundreds to hundreds of thousands of times more plentiful simply cannot work.
    30 Oct 2012, 03:09 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2302) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    That video by Hans Rosling exquisitley highlights what the demand will be for a modern powered lifestyle in the coming decades.

     

    But the idea that renewable energy sources can realistically provide all the energy needed for the 5 billion more people who want washing machines is challenged in David McKay's TED talk:

     

    "David MacKay: A reality check on renewables"

     

    http://bit.ly/LeH4Wb

     

    Classic quote from this video, "I love renewables, but I am also pro-arithmetic."

     

    Industrial countries just do not have the land mass available to power their lifestyle entirely from solar, biomass, or wind-powered energy production.

     

    We are stuck with fossil fuels and perhaps nuclear to power our western lifestyle for the foreseeable future, irrespective of one's beliefs about carbon-driven global climate change.
    30 Oct 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    The MacKay video is another TED classic that helps put things in perspective, and he doesn't even really pay attention to the catastrophic impact of intermittency when 24/7/365 stability is essential. By the time you take global raw material demand from Rosling, global space constraints from MacKay and fold in pollution of the commons from intermittency, the landscape is not pretty.
    30 Oct 2012, 12:32 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    "If I am not mistaken, there are some posters on this board who do not believe CO2 is causing global warming. Leaving that issue aside, I wonder how these posters explain ocean acidification and what they propose to do about it. "

     

    I rather suspect I am one of those posters you believe questions CO2 impacts on climate. Whether or not "CO2 is causing global warming" is tangentially relevant to energy storage and Axion Power products through the government policy prescriptions and rationales. Neither direct nor indirect linkage to ocean acidification is apparent to me, however, so I prefer discussion of the issue elsewhere.
    30 Oct 2012, 12:39 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Capturing energy from ocean currents would at least obviate the problem of intermittency, assuming it is even possible to clear all of the technical hurdles to implementing such a solution:

     

    http://1.usa.gov/SflDHy

     

    In the meantime, if Axion works itself into playing an outsized role in the energy storage arena, our world might be crumbling around us but those of us posting on this board will be rolling in dough.
    30 Oct 2012, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'll be delighted if Axion is a credible competitor in just a couple of these new niche markets. An 'outsized role' would have me smiling as my Nubian litter bearers carried me to the bank.
    30 Oct 2012, 03:34 PM Reply Like
  • billa_from_sf
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    As long as you keep all of your clothes on on your litter!
    30 Oct 2012, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Like all sensible human beings I try to conceal my shortcomings rather than flaunt them.
    30 Oct 2012, 03:46 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1038) | Send Message
     
    When is Axion supposed to report Q3 earnings?

     

    I'm watching Maxwell get hammered right now after reporting a profitable but somewhat flat Q3 and a cautious short-term outlook. I hope we don't get the same treatment from Axion. Maybe a good time to get back into Maxwell, though.
    26 Oct 2012, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Axion typically reports a day or two before their regulatory filing deadline so I'd expect somewhere between the 12th and 14th.

     

    Maxwell's in a difficult position right now because they're right at the transition point between consistently losing money and consistently making money. That's when you start getting analysts forecasting revenue and earnings and it never takes much to miss somebody's target. Axion shouldn't be facing those kinds of problems for another year or two anyway.
    26 Oct 2012, 10:13 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    Note Maxwell said they had issues with their ultracapacitor for hybrids! Swoop in Axion, anytime...
    26 Oct 2012, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Ranma, It appears that is a system related issue in their Chinese bus market and not related to Maxwell's product.

     

    Pg 2 of the transcript.

     

    "...I traveled to China last month to meet face to face with key bus customers. At that time, their forecast with the fourth quarter was still very aggressive.

     

    However, in the interim, we become aware of some Hybrid Drive System application issues that are impacting our production schedules. There are mechanical vibrations in the system, higher than our module specification, which are causing interface and cabling issues. I should emphasize, that these issues are mechanical, not electrical. And our application engineers are now working with customers to resolve these interface issues, so that normal production can resume in the months ahead."

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    26 Oct 2012, 12:40 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1777) | Send Message
     
    I would say that Axion will wait till the last possible day, in hopes that they can say something positive about NS and the NS999 retrofit. Though, the way information has been coming on this, we will probably know more from WTB's Altoona connection than from either NS or Axion.
    I just want to hear one phrase on the CC..."UL certification of Axion's HUB has been approved".
    26 Oct 2012, 02:13 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    We have a product. It's UL certified. You can order one today.

     

    Errr, TG, Can you repeat that one more time. I lost the phone signal. A little louder this time as well. :)
    26 Oct 2012, 02:19 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    Labtech, the UL forecast has always been for the end of the year. It's not even Halloween yet. Patience, and keep your fantasies under control.
    26 Oct 2012, 07:17 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Rick for bringing us back to reality.

     

    For your efforts I pass to you the honorary J.S. damp rag award for cooling down the speculation. Carry it with honor and pass it on as you see fit. I have selfishly carried it for far too long.

     

    http://bit.ly/UOnNlE
    26 Oct 2012, 08:01 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Somethings changed?

     

    http://bit.ly/uGVJsb
    Oct 15, 2012 81,454

     

    Shorts three days prior to that report and the 15th, in 1000s ...

     

    30 44 34 71

     

    This is an unusually large short report and nothing within the normal T+3 delivery period would suggest this is a reasonable number. And we suspect that certificate conversion issues are behind us ... except Quercus?

     

    Next bigger ones back
    May 31, 2012 58,904
    Dec 30, 2011 52,290
    Sept 15, 2011 111,844

     

    Does this mean a trend has started where someone is actually shorting us? It could explain some stuff.

     

    HardToLove
    EDIT: Some VWAPs up through 10/15: 0.3026
    0.3000 0.3106 0.3222 0.3105 0.3160 0.3108 0.3146
    26 Oct 2012, 12:28 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    It's almost impossible to short Axion because it's almost impossible to borrow the stock. Brokers can only loan shares that are held in margin accounts, and that can't be done with Axion.

     

    After watching the short number bounce up and down for two and a half years I believe it's nothing more than processing delays.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:40 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    I wouldn't be surprised if there were programs out there to auto-short microcap stocks during market red days. Along with the potential of margin calls, illiquidity of micros mean that they would fall a lot more than big caps.

     

    Note AXPW seems to move with the market.

     

    Unfortunately I learned the painful way that microcaps don't recover after this kind of fall. But someone is there to clean up at the bottom.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:44 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    HTL. It's always something.

     

    http://bit.ly/VNp4el
    26 Oct 2012, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >JP ... It is my understanding from talking to the trade desk at Fidelity that shorts can be made from a brokers' inventory. Next question is; Why on earth would a broker carry Axion in inventory? Or why would they loan it if they had it?
    26 Oct 2012, 12:52 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Market makers can short, but the risk-reward profile is dismal. It will take another week before we know for sure, but I think the mud is cracking.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:56 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >JP ... As I come near my 5 year anniversary of waiting for Axion's Customer No. 1 to show up and 3 years of unrelenting selling to abate, I do hop you're right. I, for one, would like, yeah welcome, something to change and I really don't want to find that when that mud dries I'm stuck waist deep in clay.
    26 Oct 2012, 01:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    DRich: They charge vig for the borrow - make money.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 02:50 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2893) | Send Message
     
    Did we see a clean-up print later on that offset those large short numbers. This link might be talking about the same type of thing.

     

    http://bit.ly/QKP9oI
    26 Oct 2012, 06:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Bazooka: I've not yet discovered the details of operation yet.

     

    *If* there should be prints for the delivery of shares from broker to market-maker I doubt we could identify them.

     

    E.g. on 10/17 we had 300.58K shorted, 31.8% of ~944K day's volume. And we had:
    # Trds: 111, MinTrSz: 140, MaxTrSz: 74250, # Buys, Shares: 64 499004, # Sells, Shares: 45 420464. Trying to identify which trades were short sales and which were "clean-up prints" would be a fruitless task I think.

     

    There were no AH trades, which we might normally suspect of being “clean up prints”. Usually we don't have AH trades either.

     

    From the article you linked: “... does not take possession of the shares it is selling until it has completed its share sales”.

     

    I don't know of any requirement that the market-maker sell all shares before “buying” from the broker (and buying may not be required at all – see the following). All-or-none orders might be an exception.

     

    With computers everywhere I can envision a quantity being loaded on the market-maker and broker computers and every time a market-maker buy or sell is made, partial or full, quantities are adjusted. I have observed this on my buy and sell orders when partial fills are done - “quantity remaining” is adjusted on my order status and we may also see it adjusted on Level 2 (if we're not trapped in some, e.g., 5K, block presentation) and “Time & Sales”. This occurs whether my order goes to an Etrade or non-ETrade market-maker, AFAICT. So this tells me that “real-time” transactions may be done that keep everything synchronized without a need for a market-maker balancing “purchase” - we just have quantities of money and shares moved, “real-time”, among some accounts.

     

    From the article you linked: “... at the end of the day the seller delivers the shares to the market maker who then delivers those shares to the buyers of the stock”.

     

    Notice there is no mention of “buy”. I think EOD processing just gets everything over to the DTCC so it can do the clearing operations and provide the “arms-length” assurance that everything ends as it is supposed to end.

     

    I think these days the market-makers really act more like matching agents most of the time. The exceptions would be when an agreement is made to purchase the shares at some price in advance (most likely by the broker side of the house rather than the market-maker side?) or when the market-maker sees an opportunity to do “covering buys” in the market that improves his profit over what it would be if he just let the incoming shares go through the normal clearing process. For sophisticated ones like NITE, CDEL, ... with lots of capital and computing power, this is probably common. For smaller less-sophisticated ones, I think they are less likely to do this.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    27 Oct 2012, 04:01 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... Shorting Axion? That makes no economic sense from a risk/reward point of view and would be insane based on volume liquidity. Unless someone knows "for sure" something about sales, financing or personnel that we don't know the only thing that could drive a silly thing like that is a spiteful nature. The amount is not enough to worry about so I'll just chalk it up to a MM rookie trading a sector.
    26 Oct 2012, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    "the only thing that could drive a silly thing like that is a spiteful nature."

     

    Lots of folks (TSLA, AONE) out there that wouldn't mind seeing AXPW head south. Lots of bad juju covering this little sprout...
    26 Oct 2012, 01:31 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    "... chalk it up to a MM rookie trading a sector".

     

    That's what I was wondering about after John reminded that Axion can't be shorted. So many "new" MM iDs seen over the last months.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 01:42 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    Our lil stock's taking it on the chin again today. Several sellers during a buying strike. ARCA's 20k bid at 27.2 was phony. 27 cents didn't hold.
    26 Oct 2012, 01:02 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    Sheesh! Throwing a couple hun after some .2675 shares.

     

    750 measly shares. Wondering from you Level 2 studs, if you can see the order, and from what MM it's coming from.
    26 Oct 2012, 01:05 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    There is no bid showing at .2675

     

    If you're the lone bidder on your market maker, we won't see it on Level II unless there's a group of you at that exact price that sums to at least 5000 shares (and there's no sum of folks at some higher price)
    26 Oct 2012, 01:34 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, wtb. Saw that 750 shares traded at 12:59 at 27 cents. Those shares were not mine. Trade still open. I've never before added such a small amount. Almost embarrassing! But it's pretty much all the loose change I have in my gamer account, unless I sell "sumthin'" else.
    26 Oct 2012, 01:40 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    One fun/sick game to play if your market maker is showing on Level II is to bid < 5000 shares some .0001 multiple above their bid (assuming of course you're willing to pay that)

     

    I think, but am not positive, that puts you in line to be filled "first" but you may actually get it at the price that's "displayed."

     

    It can also discourage those that are determined to jump over you and "ride" the price up (or down on the offer side)

     

    Some folks won't even accept a tie where they were in line first ... they're determined to be in line first, which of course is their free choice.

     

    This is just another example of how there may be more demand at (or very near) a price than you see from Level II.
    26 Oct 2012, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1176) | Send Message
     
    i think we are doing well today. rejected another push lower. finish will be important.
    26 Oct 2012, 02:13 PM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (531) | Send Message
     
    Mayascribe: I did something similar today. Cleaned out the coins from the couch cushions to buy a few more Axion shares at $.275.

     

    Felt good to do something.
    26 Oct 2012, 03:33 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    Really? I think today sucked. 28 cents was support, now it's resistance. BTIG and NITE on the ask, with ATDF persistently undercutting as usual. Deja vu all over again.

     

    Not calling armegeddon, but sure looks like yet another retest of 25 to me. Heck, we're only a couple cents away already. But take that with a huge grain of salt--sadly, almost all the stock price predictions/theories on this blog have been terribly wrong. Including mine. BUT, the due dilly investigations and posts, on the completely opposite hand, have been awesome. Thanks to all for those. We should keep in mind this value dichotomy for the next blog.
    26 Oct 2012, 04:16 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    I think the bottom line is Axion will have to announce sales before we go anywhere measurably higher and long run price is affected - not just a spike. I'm really just waiting for some news from New Castle and am hoping we get a sale before Jan 2013, although that is now only a short time away.
    26 Oct 2012, 04:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    I'm with you Metro. Don't see firm direction until sales and/or the strategic partner. The latter is IMO more important. Once TG said he was looking I think the market started waiting and watching. Since Axion requires a strategic partner for large roll out and as a primary channel for funding it's a big requirement.

     

    It's true that the NSC, BMW and the other automaker testing is probably just as important if not more so than the strategic partnership. But the partnership and related funding are validation.
    26 Oct 2012, 04:37 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    "Don't see firm direction until sales and/or the strategic partner."

     

    Anyone see any strong incentive for either a buyer or investor to make new commitments before some Nov. 6 election results are known? Any reason for buyer/investor to postpone action?
    26 Oct 2012, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, Well the market never likes uncertainty. That being said, I don't think Axion is that big a deal for the type of partner Axion might fit well with. It's just not that big of an initial investment.

     

    I would suggest the bigger issue is where Axion might fit with potential partners future plans. And as John points out how far each party is willing to bend to get a deal done.
    26 Oct 2012, 05:16 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    "I would suggest the bigger issue is where Axion might fit with potential partners future plans."

     

    We are thinking similarly, apparently. Those future plans, though, just might be affected by regulatory actions. Some news reports have suggested EPA has a passel of new regs prepared for release after the elections. The agency has already taken multiple actions in the past two years that limit demand and/or increase cost associated with lead use and coal.
    26 Oct 2012, 07:29 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, I understand your point.

     

    I do wonder how much any added regs concerning lead will impact Axion in the short/medium term given alternatives. Maybe emissions changes force more reprocessing and mining outside of the US?
    26 Oct 2012, 08:33 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    I doubt that additional lead regulations (for secondary smelting) will significantly impact Axion. US already has very tight lead regulations for manufacturing, and AFAIK Axion is in compliance with regs that went into effect Jan 2012 http://1.usa.gov/RTlpWe (no, I have not read the entire thing). It seems the rulemaking for lead has been going on since 1997.

     

    Mining (primary smelting) may be subject to tighter regs, but I doubt that would impact Axion directly. Likewise reprocessing regs may tighten.

     

    Does anybody know if yet tighter regs are in process?
    26 Oct 2012, 09:41 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Rick, Here's a letter from the ILA regarding some regs in Europe. You can get a start here for European regs if that's of interest.

     

    http://bit.ly/S1Rquq
    26 Oct 2012, 11:20 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    I do not know that EPA is holding proposed regs tightening lead manufacture or use or that would further crimp demand for coal. The possibility of such did cross my mind, though, and reading about the alleged delay(s) until after elections. Avoidance of implementing more new regs shortly before the elections does strike me as more than a little plausible, though. And the risk is not limited to EPA. Department of Labor, FERC, Federal Transportation Administration, etc. could also have actions on hold until after elections.

     

    Tightening of mining regulations or further restrictions of emissions could affect a lot of investment decisions across a very broad range of industries. Tightening of emissions regulations on coal-fired plants definitely adversely impacted demand for coal, coal transportation services, and RR equipment. Changes in diesel emissions standards could strongly influence the type of systems selected and rate of RR and heavy trucking adoption of BEV and start/stop systems.

     

    I more concerned about potential for regulatory changes with adverse impact thru indirect effects that have in effect been "under the radar"
    26 Oct 2012, 11:38 PM Reply Like
  • Johhny rambo
    , contributor
    Comments (117) | Send Message
     
    Wish I'd had a few hundred thou to throw at AONE this week.
    Quick in and out would have been magnificent.
    Can anybody please assure me, that we are not going to the end of the year at .28c ,especially with a financing coming up ?
    From well researched earlier comments we had all hoped that the stock supply/demand inflection point was reached a month ago.

     

    Does anyone think that the Bulletin board listing will nullify that upwards movement, and will Axion perhaps consider a stock consolidation to get it over that mental hump ?

     

    I know John has commented they "should" never consider it, and in many aspects, I agree, but I just wonder if the board will start to think differently, if we continue in the doldrums, with no wind in the forseeable future.
    26 Oct 2012, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    Yes Johnny,
    I assure you. No risk with Axion. Its risk free. I will guarantee you we won't be at $.28 by year end.
    It might be lower, It might be higher, but I guarantee it won't be at $.28.

     

    Thats a safe bet I think.
    26 Oct 2012, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    For you Elliot wave folks, it "looks" like we "could" be nearing the end of the fifth wave down, which began May 2.
    26 Oct 2012, 03:36 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Maya: I hope so. Since we re-entered our descending trading channel Wed. 10/17, nothing but sideways or weaker. And Monday we need to stop pushing on my experimental lower Bollinger or I thin $0.25 is in sight again.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    Hard: Are you seeing much AH trading of late?
    26 Oct 2012, 04:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Maya: almost zilch. Last one was 10/18, 543 shares, 10/8 5K, 10/4 10K, 10/3 10K,

     

    There's some in prior months too. Took a peek at September and we had a lot more instances - 10, 3 in Aug.

     

    Note that in all cases they were single trades only.

     

    HardToLove
    26 Oct 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1047) | Send Message
     
    If we do go to .25, I suspect we'll bounce off of that pretty quickly. I think a greater risk than going to .25, is the "upside risk" of not having as much AXPW stock as we would like when it resumes its rise. When AXPW made it to .64 earlier this year, I was kicking myself for no having invested more when it was lower. I resolved that if it ever went back down to earlier levels, I would not repeat that error.

     

    I've since been adding at .40, .35, .30, and then a last 10,500 shares this morning at .28. There's SO much to indicate there are better days ahead. And when it happens, it could happen very fast. Just don't want to be left behind. As with most everybody here on the APC, I expect Axion to do very well in the coming years.
    26 Oct 2012, 04:20 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    It's not quite soup yet, no. But nobody persists in extensive & expensive testing of vaporware for year upon year. Especially not world-class entities like BMW and NS. There *is* a there there. Of course, *we're* not there yet, but it's there. And one day we will be too.
    26 Oct 2012, 05:57 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    Also a lot lower volume is taking this down this time - so it will take a lot less for it to bounce back up again.
    26 Oct 2012, 06:28 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    Q. for HTL.

     

    As a Linux user do you have a strong preference for a particular distribution and/or user desktop interface?

     

    I'm thinking of replacing my desktop (Intel Celeron CPU, Windoz XP,SP3) with something a bit more modern but not inclined to engage with Windows 8. And, I don't care for the premium Apple asks for their products or being locked into proprietary application software offerings.
    26 Oct 2012, 08:29 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    One free option you may not have heard of or considered:

     

    http://getchrome.eu

     

    Built on SUSE, mainly a way to run the chrome browser fast.

     

    Interesting if you don't want to being overly involved with updates.

     

    I use the Live-DVD version (so you have to be access to someone to write the DVD for you) and be able to boot from a DVD. The free downloads are very slow, but I just start them on a second old/slow machine and go off to do other things.

     

    There is also a boot from a USB drive option.

     

    You can also totally install it on your hard drives, but I can't speak to that.

     

    They put out new versions every other month or so.

     

    If you're super security conscious, that probably doesn't work for you. On the other hand, Linux/Chrome is relatively more secure (less attacked) than many other options.

     

    At the least it's an easy way to experiment with a different environment and see if it works for you before committing to it.

     

    The distro brings you up a Chrome(chromium) browser, so if you're already sync a lot of your info (bookmarks, extensions, passwords, etc.) with Google, it can be acceptable. You do have to create a new tab and sign in to Chromium/Google in the latest version.

     

    Pros and cons to this, but even in your current environment, if you are a Chrome user, or try it and migrate, it can make moving to (or testing) new environments easier. Syncing (and cloud) is one of today's paradigms. Pros and cons of course for the super super duper security conscious.

     

    Note that this technique runs totally in memory, so it's fast, but if you don't have much memory, you won't be happy. I do have to deal with memory leaks ... wherever they are. Closing and reopening the browser seems to help, as does logging off and back on. I suspect Flash is one culprit I do keep a System Monitor up and pay attention when I get near 87% memory utilization. It does not fail gracefully. If I'm lucky, it offers to let me kill a tab or two, and then I can close the browser and reopen and it brings everything back in less memory. I use the Read Later Fast extension (built on Diigo) and I can save/stack links I want to look at later and be sure not to lose.

     

    Currently, the extension syncing works oddly. It takes a while for some unknown reason for them to be synced. I just do adblock plus manually and head off to seekingalpha.com and usually I'm involved there and they eventually come up.

     

    If you're an iTunes person,bad. But if you do Google Play, not so bad. No ways near perfect, but for email/web, can be very fast ... and "free."
    27 Oct 2012, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the info, wt. A Live-DVD or USB drive bootable linux gives one more options.

     

    I haven't run linux consistently for several years now. Prior to this system purchase (which came with Windows XT installed) I ran versions of RedHat linux from their version 4.1 and planned to switch to Debian with this system but a driver for its HPvs15 flat screen display was not available.
    27 Oct 2012, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    D-Inv: Wtb comments are very good. I personally prefer the "enterprise" distributions that are more stable but don't always have the latest bells and whistles.

     

    Right now I run CentOS 6.x, a 100% Red Hat Linux compatible re-spin.

     

    http://centos.org

     

    It's rpm-based update system (yum) does a good job of keeping things updated and about all I ever have to do is re-boot if a new kernel is installed. It has Gnome and KDE desktops available and several window mangers, including some light-weight ones.

     

    I'm all 64-bit right now and I don't know if Chrome is there yet - I use Firefox for my browser.

     

    As with Wtb's stuff, flash sometimes presents issues, but not that often. I don't seem to have any memory-leaks to speak of most of the time, but occasionally plugins get haywire and slow things, mess with the screen, make FF unresponsive, etc. But I do load the system pretty heavily sometimes.

     

    There's a bunch of free distributions geared more-or-less to different "markets": Scientific Linux, CentoS, Suse, Fedora (bleeding edge and labor intensive - it's essentially the development release for Red Hat Linux), ...

     

    HardToLove
    27 Oct 2012, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the input, HTL. Centos will definitely be looked at. IIRC, Centos had been organized but not around very long when I bought my last system and it was not clear to me what direction that distribution was taking. I had not been willing to spring for the cost of RedHat Enterprise and moved to Fedora when RedHat stopped offering its earlier distributions without enterprise support.

     

    Beyond lack of a driver for my new display, "Fedora (bleeding edge and labor intensive...)" was a prime factor prompting move away from RedHat. Maybe should have been a bit more patient and taken a closer look at Centos.
    27 Oct 2012, 06:28 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    D-Inv: it's been very good, IMO, for years. They update very quickly as RH issues patches. They had a hiccup, when RH changed their process and distributions to fight the parasitic Oracle actions, going from 5.x->6.x, but once they got the updated processes in place, they were back on track.

     

    They have a live CD too. As to USB, I don't know. I gened my own USB-key boot so that I can run my HP Pavilion, with W7 installed, with Linux too. Resized the W7 partition to 1/2 and allocated the rest to Linux. When USB key is in it defaults to Linux, but allows selection of W7. If it's not in, defaults to W7. I know enough now to say that it should be possible with little trouble to install the system (or portions of it) on any USB bootable device (BIOS would need to support it) w/o much problem.

     

    One just really needs to decide what they want before choosing CentOS. A large part of the web servers run Centos in conjunction with some RH licensed machines to reduce cost and because the desired stability is inherent. If RH has bugs they will appear in CentOS too because they aim for 100% compatibility. Support for new devices may come more slowly in CentOS as they await RH updates. For me, this is not a problem.

     

    On the support side, it appears the user community is much more of an administrator community than some others. Very knowledgeable, but I have noticed sometimes that some types of questions on the mailing list may go unanswered without some prodding. It generally has not been a problem for me.

     

    Their forum support may be very helpful but I've not visited it for a *long* time. Not much need to when things just more or less run problem-free ... as long as I keep my grubby mitts off the stuff! :-)

     

    HardToLove
    28 Oct 2012, 07:08 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    "They had a hiccup, when RH changed their process and distributions to fight the parasitic Oracle actions, going from 5.x->6.x, but once they got the updated processes in place, they were back on track."

     

    'Back in the day' virus's and root kits were a non-issue with Linux OSs. Is that still pretty much the case?
    28 Oct 2012, 05:28 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    D-Inv: Sort of. As the desktop environment tries more and more to emulate Windows stuff, gaps in certain types of protection have developed - mostly in browsers and e-mail attachments now.

     

    Many of these are stuffed though because the Selinux facility prevents most of the common black-hat attacks from doing anything outside the expected behavior, e.g., writing into system component areas, reading certain types of files and devices, ... The RH/Centos distributions include Selinux, enabled by default and with a pretty good configuration. I only recall ever having to adjust a couple of times when I added some non-standard components.

     

    When folks disable Selinux (usually administrators with "special needs" or being too new to know how to work with the Selinux and they think they need to disable it for testing or whatnot) they may open themselves up to such things as root kits or other exploits. A normal desktop user seldom experiences problems with Selinux though and it adds another layer above what's inherent in the normal user and group protections.

     

    The only incursion I ever had was back on some old Slackware version in the ... mid-90s? I had a web-facing mail-server and I wasn't as familiar with the risks then and got some junk put into my system that took me a day or so to discover and clean out. The exploit hid things, making it difficult because you couldn't see the bad stuff that was running.

     

    There are several AV mail scanners available and things like Thunderbird and Evolution already include some.

     

    So, if it's not too late, the short version is security is even better for Linux now than it was years back and it was good at a system level then, although exposing your unit to incoming requests for service, such as a web server would have to do, still present risks and closing unused ports and other steps are still advised (port-knocking being one example).

     

    Regardless of all that, I have another layer in the form of an old Athlon K III with IPCop that acts as my router and firewall for my in-home LAN (wired, of course). So I may be overestimating the security inherent in Linux a little.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Oct 2012, 05:52 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    Thanks again, HTL.
    28 Oct 2012, 09:08 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    I'm wondering out loud if the deal will be structured like an upfront loan against future orders, with perhaps a 5-10% share of the company as a loan fee.
    26 Oct 2012, 11:23 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    Wonder how Axion's patents apply to New Zealand and more specifically to ArcActive and their carbon negative electrode?

     

    http://bit.ly/GLRUAB

     

    From ArcActive website:
    http://bit.ly/R9vMDI

     

    "ArcActive's electrode has been designed to be a direct substitution for existing negative electrodes in flooded LABs. As flooded LABs are the lowest cost form of starter battery, even with the modest additional cost contributed by the AACarbon electrode, the resultant battery will still be a fundamentally low cost product. We expect that batteries using ArcActive's electrodes will be no more expensive than the AGM batteries that are the current start/stop battery of choice.

     

    Being a flooded LAB design has an additional benefit: the volume of manufacturing capacity for flooded LABs is vast and ArcActive's solution will avoid the large capital expenditures currently facing the LAB industry as it builds AGM capacity to meet projected start/stop battery demand. "

     

    and the philandering dog Prince Albert likes them.
    27 Oct 2012, 05:07 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'm not sure whether Axion bothered to patent the PbC in New Zealand. but I did have breakfast with ArcActive's chief scientist John Abramson during the ELBC because I was curious about a subtle shift in their emphasis over the last couple years from carbon nanotubes to simply a better carbon. The bottom line is that ArcActive is still at the science fair stage and while they believe they have a cost effective way to make a high-quality carbon that could be useful in devices like the PbC, they're nowhere close to making a battery.
    27 Oct 2012, 06:19 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    John, Do you happen to know where Axion has patented it's technology?

     

    US, Germany, Japan and?
    27 Oct 2012, 08:33 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I don't know, but I do see things that look suspiciously like snowflakes swirling outside my window in late October. Perhaps the Germans will get that cold winter the grid operators fear.
    27 Oct 2012, 10:27 AM Reply Like
  • BugEYE
    , contributor
    Comments (195) | Send Message
     
    iindelco,
    we have discussed this before in concentrator 87.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    From deamiter's kind comment,
    "It looks like their stratagies have changed over time. Early on, they covered a range of countries (in the first patent listed). Then, perhaps for financial reasons, they only filed in the US. Most recently, they filed in a list of countries not including Europe (although they filed EP applications in 2007, perhaps just to leave their options open at the time). I'm not sure whether they're trying to cover manufacturing or sales in Mexico, India and China although maybe somebody knowledgable in the manufacture and markets for advanced Lead-acid batteries could comment.

     

    These are all "item and method of making electrodes or batteries" patents so I don't see any obvious regional strategies based on a novice's understanding of the details.

     

    6,466,429 -- granted in US, HK (Hong Kong) KR (Korea) JP (Japan) AU (Australia), DE (Germany), AT? (Austria) CA (Canada) CN (China

     

    6628501 -- Granted in US, AT, DE, HK, AU, JP, CN, KR, CA

     

    6706079 -- Granted in US, filed in AU

     

    7006346 -- Granted in US

     

    7011242 -- Granted in US

     

    7119047 -- Granted in US

     

    7569514 -- Granted in US

     

    7881041 (typo? Doesn't seem to match description in 10K) Granted in US

     

    8023251 -- Granted in US, CN -- Applied in CA, IN (India), KR, MX (Mexico)

     

    7998616 -- Granted in US and CN -- Applied for in JP, MX, KR, CA, IN "
    27 Oct 2012, 08:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Bugeye, Thanks for taking the time and effort to track that down for me. I seemed to have missed it the first time around..
    28 Oct 2012, 05:03 PM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (799) | Send Message
     
    From ArcActive website:
    http://bit.ly/XyQaUq

     

    "Micro- and mild-hybrid cars are expected to be the mass market cars of the future. These vehicles require new battery technologies to meet with the stringent emissions limits being imposed on automakers and as the following projections show, this represents a significant new battery market in the coming decades:
    •Pike Research (September 2012): 41m new start/stop cars per year by 2020.
    •McKinsey (May 2012): Start/Stop battery market to be greater than US$12B/year by 2020.
    •Lux Research (February 2012): Start/Stop battery market US$6.9B/year by 2017.
    •Pike Research (June 2011): Start/Stop battery market US$8.9B/year by 2020.
    •Johnson Controls (June 2011): 100m start/stop batteries per year by 2020 (including both new cars and the aftermarket)."

     

    WOW!!! Muchos dollares.

     

    Have a good day-Carlos
    27 Oct 2012, 07:17 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    For those of you that love to curl up with a nice patent ...

     

    Indy Power Systems just got one on Oct. 16!

     

    http://bit.ly/SoPSxp

     

    http://bit.ly/S339ZO (pretty picture)

     

    http://1.usa.gov/SoPRcx

     

    "Abstract

     

    A cell management system and method for balancing energy across a plurality of cells coupled to a circuit bus. The system can include a transformer, two transformer switches, and for each cell, a first switch pair allowing transfer of energy between the transformer and the cell, and a second switch pair allowing removal or inclusion of the cell in the serial connection of cells. The system can include an energy storage device, a switch pair allowing transfer of energy between the transformer and the storage device, and for each cell, a third switch pair allowing transfer of energy between the storage device and the cell. The system can include cell, bus and storage device sensors and state estimators. The system can include a controller that controls the transformer switches, cell switches, and storage device switches based on the sensor readings and states."
    27 Oct 2012, 11:25 AM