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  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    being early is no better than being wrong.

     

    looks like I'm earliest. ;)
    8 Jan, 07:09 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1494) | Send Message
     
    Second !
    8 Jan, 07:36 PM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (235) | Send Message
     
    Three people have like 481's comment and only two have commented... something is fishy here.

     

    Edit: I'll make 4.
    8 Jan, 08:48 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (751) | Send Message
     
    Not everyone has noticed that without posting at least once, the update flagging doesn't happen.
    8 Jan, 09:17 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (751) | Send Message
     
    Should be some ePower updates any day now.
    8 Jan, 09:18 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (751) | Send Message
     
    If not the "On the Road" report then the progress on the day cab version?
    9 Jan, 07:42 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    The tractor is ready to roll, but we've been working on completing the insurance and registration process. Baring any more hiccups, it should be on the road today.
    9 Jan, 07:58 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (434) | Send Message
     
    Will there be some official announcement with some hoopla?
    9 Jan, 09:00 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    I don't plan to beat the table with anything formal until we have at least one completed fuel economy demonstration with a third-party fleet operator. ePower can do fuel economy testing till hell freezes over and our numbers will always be suspect. If we give the tractor to a fleet operator who hauls freight every day for a couple weeks, that operator's daily logs of routes driven, weights hauled, elapsed time and fuel consumed will be widely accepted as accurate; although there will still be many who say "two weeks is great but get back to us when you have a couple years of operations data."

     

    While I'd like to think we can push things along a little faster, it will probably be a month before the chest thumping commences; assuming everything goes according to plan and we don't have any major reliability issues.

     

    In the meantime we'll focus our attention on getting the day cab built and tested.
    9 Jan, 09:26 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (434) | Send Message
     
    How about some online pics at least. You know everybody here will greatly appreciate them.
    9 Jan, 09:49 AM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (220) | Send Message
     
    Although JP has considerable patience and Axionistas have considerable anxiety, IMO we should let the poor man try to concentrate on making a "go" of ePower and TRY to refrain from peppering him with too many "Daddy, are we there yet" queries.

     

    We all know that JP will pipe up when way stations on this adventure are sighted.
    9 Jan, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (434) | Send Message
     
    Rugged, I was asking the question but meaning more towards E-Power. When a company reaches an important milestone they usually want to publicize it.

     

    I probably would have called the local news and have them report it.
    9 Jan, 10:09 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Masi> The pictures won't look much different because the tractor is the same and the only visible difference is a red engine instead of a green one. The information that really matters will be coming from our first fleet operator.
    9 Jan, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (434) | Send Message
     
    Thanx John, I just thought it was an important millstone for E-Power. Maybe even a local news story.
    9 Jan, 10:18 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Thanks JP - still enjoy hearing whatever preliminary tidbits you can throw our way ... of course with the understanding that everything is currently preliminary.
    9 Jan, 10:47 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    Dassa gut news!

     

    http://bit.ly/11WWKrM

     

    HardToLove
    9 Jan, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1828) | Send Message
     
    OK, I know I'm getting a little ahead of myself here but I'll ask just because I thought of it.

     

    JP, in 2 years time, or whenever the first 56 PbC in the first truck have reached the end of their useful life, you're going to send them back to Axion for analysis, right?

     

    You're not just going to send them to the recycling plant, are you?

     

    Stupid question? Aside: I teach a training class every once in awhile and if I'm feeling particularly casual I say to the attendees "there are no stupid questions; only stupid people".

     

    D
    9 Jan, 11:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Axion has been pulling a battery for tear-down analysis every couple months because it's trying to wrap its arms around degradation rates so that it can nail down a reasonable warranty period and terms. Even dead batteries have lessons to teach and Axion isn't missing any opportunity to learn because it's all part of the process of figuring out how to make a product and then figuring out how to make the product better and cheaper.
    10 Jan, 07:44 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    When you're building something new often the most important parts you build are the ones that fail. They have much to teach you so you can make sure you never see them again. It's far better to learn this lesson early in the life of the program. Learning it when you have millions in the field is not recommended.
    10 Jan, 07:55 AM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    JP> What has been the prognosis of the tear-downs to date? Is Axion finding any degradation or pre-failure warning signs at all?
    10 Jan, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    They're apparently very happy with the way the batteries are holding up. While they're keeping the details close to their vest, the proposed warranty periods keep getting longer and that's a good sign.
    10 Jan, 09:52 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    John, Directionally, where is the proposed warranty period falling in miles and/or duration of ownership. I think I remember you sharing one data point on this topic but since it's a moving target an update would be of interest.
    10 Jan, 09:57 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Current discussions are in the 4,000 hour range, although we're hoping that number will climb with time and experience.
    10 Jan, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Well under a year for a sleeper with team drivers is not going to get them excited. I think it's going to be interesting to see what kind of range you have to cycle these through as you tune the gen 3 unit currently entering testing to get that number up.

     

    Is that for full replacement and are there discussions to have limited warranties after some level of full warranty period? Sorry, an interesting point as you can well imagine.

     

    I know these are not firm numbers .
    10 Jan, 10:21 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    An eight hour day with 250 working days a year is 2,000 hours. A year of running a sleeper cab with team drivers should save about 12,000 gallons of fuel at $4 a gallon. When you weigh $50,000 in fuel savings against $20,000 in battery maintenance it shouldn't be an insurmountable obstacle, particularly if real service life is longer than warranty life.
    10 Jan, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Fair enough.

     

    So for your calculation you're using about a 30 % fuel savings? And the rebuild differential cost ePower vs standard with resale value of any unused used components?

     

    If I'm digging too deep just say so. I know you've shared some of this before but it is evolving information.
    10 Jan, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    John,
    "When you weigh $50,000 in fuel savings against $20,000 in battery maintenance it shouldn't be an insurmountable obstacle, particularly if real service life is longer than warranty life."

     

    That's really going to be the question. Unless something is just a dud, I rarely find that something I've purchased that has a warranty only lasts as long as the warranty. Axion really isn't going to know how long their batteries are going to last in an application until they've run them long enough to get them to fail.
    10 Jan, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    Makes sense. If a team drives 600 miles a day, the difference between 6 mpg and 9 mpg is 33 gallons a day @$4, or $48k a year.

     

    It's a no brainer to save $48k by spending $20k a year. That assumes replacing all 56 batteries annually which sounds kind of worst case to me. If you amortize another $12k per year of added retrofit cost and add something for perhaps any additional maintenance (?) it is still compelling. At least $10k savings. Plus Axion should get cost/price down on the batteries when it scales up. Right now we're assuming $357 per PbC.
    10 Jan, 11:04 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    And let us not forget that Dr. Bueil(sp?) said that the batteries can be refreshed with a trickle charge every so often.

     

    So potential lifetime is potentially longer if every xx months there's a day of downtime wherein the batteries can be refreshed.

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    The national average is 6 mpg and we're expecting about 9 at heavy weights with double digits for lighter weights. So a 30% reduction in fuel consumption is a reasonable ballpark figure.

     

    Trying to nail down the cost differential between the ePower drivetrain and a conventional drivetrain is tough at this point because we've been buying components one at a time and it's hard to get clean data on the avoided cost vs a conventional rebuild. By the time we tack on a reasonable margin, we think the differential should be in the mid-$60s for low volumes and the mid-$40s for high volumes, but there's a lot of guess-work in those numbers.

     

    Battery life and future battery costs are going to be significant issues and we have a clear preference for longer and lower, but we're also leaving "green arm band value" out of our calculus and focusing solely on hard operating economics.
    10 Jan, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Thanks John, I know you are pretty much buying on the spot market for your test units, never enough money, and this is not where you will remain once you validate the technology and the business case. Everyone holds their preferred partner numbers very close to the chest but once you start to get a package that makes sense everyone will come to the party slowly because in the end you have to sell units to make anything.

     

    As always, thanks for sharing some of where you are at along with your thoughts. Exciting times.
    10 Jan, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2097) | Send Message
     
    Hi RA,
    If you think those #s look good, then consider that a single driver can drive 600 miles a day, a team can get 1000-1200 miles a day. Say from Los Angeles to Dallas in a 24 hour period (apprx) when conditions are right.
    10 Jan, 01:23 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    I'd be curious also as to what the actual EOL failure mode looks like---is it a graceful decline in DCA and/or power output? A gradual reduction in energy capacity? Or do one or both of those things really fall off a cliff at some point? For shallow cycling I bet the answers are going to be fascinating. I wonder if even Axion knows at this point. To my mind it's still going to take many data points and results of probably hundreds of thousands of shallow cycles in order to really fill out that "slide 8" graph..

     

    2-5% DOD? "To infinity and beyond!" ;)
    10 Jan, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    I'll tell ya what, for a 20k USD battery, irrespective of the payback, I'd want Axion to tell me how to use the battery tender/charger HTL keeps bringing up relative to Dr. Buiels comment's to help me get xyz additional hours of use out of the batteries. Also, If I were ePower, I'd tell Axion to make sure they develop this and if necessary design an optimal battery charger I can have my customers order. Fleet operators are going to want it as part of their PM schedule for sure. Should be an easy enticement for the customer to get him to jump.
    10 Jan, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    "That assumes replacing all 56 batteries annually which sounds kind of worst case to me."

     

    RA,

     

    (I'm reading that to mean you think they may only have to replace some of them each year)

     

    (and re-reading it I realize you might also mean that replacement of the full bank may be required not every year but perhaps at longer intervals. nevertheless, my thoughts below apply to the first case...)

     

    Given what we hope is the "non-spooky" ie predictable nature of the PbC vs Li-ion and even AGM (with its ever present threat of spontaneous sulfation) and given the fact that in the ePower application all the batteries are configured in one string and thus *should* experience nearly identical duty, given all that it would strike me as undesirable if some individual batteries started requiring replacement before others. What I mean is, if quality control and consistency is present in manufacture, and then each battery essentially experiences the same duty life, then each battery *should* start to manifest its failure modes at roughly the same point. Only true of course, if the failure modes follow some kind of known mechanism and progression and are not somewhat random (like dendrites in Li-ion etc)... Better obviously for us and for the PbC the more predictable, consistent, and stable it is. So I hope it turns out that ePower indeed does have to replace the whole 56 string at once when the time comes because that will mean each battery is wearing as expected on a predictable, consistent path, with no nasty surprises.

     

    Because, as we know, some batteries are often all about nasty surprises. ;)
    10 Jan, 02:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    $8, Well we don't know the failure modes. But if some are catastrophic with only individual units impacted surely reconditioning makes sense. John did indicate that it is ePowers intent to supply only large format battery packs and not individual PbC batteries which makes some level of sense. This doesn't mean that ePower or some other source can't assess and refurbish a pack if it makes sense.

     

    Anyway, let's hope this is not the norm.
    10 Jan, 02:44 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    JP, re': "Even dead batteries have lessons to teach and Axion isn't missing any opportunity to learn"
    Has E-Power experienced "dead batteries"?
    Does Axion test batteries before deciding which ones to pull for a closer look?
    If a dead battery were to occur in a big string, or a large format pack, does that render the battery pack useless?
    If the battery pack were useless, does that mean the truck is stopped dead or can it still limp along but without the help of the pack?
    Has the physical durability of the PbC been tested in the past with respect to temperature extremes and vibrational forces that will come with taking it on the road?
    11 Jan, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    ePower has not experienced any battery failures and as far as I know Axion's selection process for picking batteries to evaluate is random.

     

    If our drivetrain lost a battery it would render the string useless because all 56 batteries are connected in series. In that event, the tractor would run just fine on generator power, but it would accelerate more slowly and be forced to downshift more frequently for hills. We refer to it as "limp home mode," but driving at speeds of 45 to 55 mph isn't exactly what I'd all limping.

     

    Over the last five years engineering teams from BMW, NS and heaven knows who else have conducted exhaustive tests of the PbC under the worst vibration and temperature conditions they can imagine. These guys are all sadists at heart and the odds that they've overlooked anything are vanishingly small.
    11 Jan, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    JP> Great to know, thanks. Would it be feasible for a driver to carry a spare PbC in case one failed? In other words, would the onboard BMS be able to pinpoint a failed battery so that a driver with a socket wrench could change out the PbC? Or are the PbC bays encased in some proprietary lockboxes where drivers would have to find an authorized service center? The latter seems likely since 56 batteries in series would be around 650 volts and rather dangerous.
    11 Jan, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    The last thing we want are drivers or untrained mechanics fooling around with battery boxes. The voltages are just too high. Since the batteries are mounted in four boxes with 14 batteries in each box, our plan is to simply swap boxes in the field and save the battery replacement work for certified shops.
    11 Jan, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    I'd agree. Part of BMW's test regiment is to take the battery to failure in some of their testing. This to assure the failure modes are known and to support their statisticians. Hot, cold, humidity and vibration testing are all requirements and are done at extremes. Even to the extent of testing for different road conditions. Roads in India, Mexico, the US and Europe all differ. They would also test for shipping conditions, via truck or rail, as the shaker tables all have different approved algorithms for this. Shipping by rail would be more abusive than what would be seen in a Bimmer for example. Or spring ride vs air ride trucking.

     

    Anyway, It's all boiler plate stuff and BMW has done it given the duration of their work together. I'd also put money on a couple of these being in vehicles driven by interested parties in the company or even perhaps a tier one supplier or two. Nothing like having experts with their finger on the pulse and watching closely. Not real fleet testing but you can learn a bunch.
    11 Jan, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    45-55 is limping. really. we're in America.
    11 Jan, 10:04 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the answers. Really.
    11 Jan, 10:08 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (434) | Send Message
     
    I'll comment..... 8 days into January and still nothing from NS. TOMORROW IS THE DAY!**** NS orders batteries for 4 more yard goats and places a battery order for the long haul locomotive. AXPW stock jumps 100% to a mediocre low and six month high of .20 cents.

     

    Are you with me Kira?? (Riddick)
    8 Jan, 09:27 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (886) | Send Message
     
    Masi. I don't think NS will order any more batteries until the 999 has been tested for a while. In the near term, I expect news of NS999 rolling under its own power will have about the same effect as JP's news today that the next generation ePower truck is now rolling.
    9 Jan, 02:28 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (751) | Send Message
     
    Keep in mind that the small nimble company, ePower, has been trying to get a truck into the hands of customers for what, months? I'm not surprised that it is taking a huge ponderous gun-shy company like NS longer than expected to get a train on the tracks.
    9 Jan, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • jcrjg
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    From the last concentrator you indicated you don't currently own any Axion but would like to get back in if certain things happen (major order comes in). Do you not own any now because you do not currently think the stock is a good investment and if those things happened then it becomes a good investment? Or do you think it is currently a good investment but ti will be much better when the order comes in and you believe that you will be able to get the shares at a reasonable price because of all the shares the PIPERs have to sell?

     

    thanks.
    8 Jan, 09:58 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9630) | Send Message
     
    jcrjg: It's more about my Wells broker, who had bad vibes that when Axion hadn't raised capital by the end of 2012, and then well into 2013, that Axion had lost it's leverage toward grinding out terms for a reasonable cap raise. I bailed during the end of last March through the beginning of last April.

     

    Proved to be prescient and sensible advise. Then along came the PIPE deal, and my broker actually scanned the 260 + page document, and I can't recall exactly what he said, except for how in the past he had owned Axion (for trading purposes only), and stated he would never again own it until things broke favorably. In short, he has seen these types of PIPE deals before, and did not like this one either.

     

    But he is very intrigued about what JP and ePower are doing, but he also knows that any sales toward ePower will be not affect cash drain much on Axion's balance sheet.

     

    Basically, I couldn't afford to lose more money on Axion, especially when the markets were on fire. I very grudgingly and painfully sold and redeployed elsewhere.

     

    I think the PbC is a fantastic product, with a very promising future, in several sectors. But we also invest in the people who represent the product, and I have all too many times heard from New Castle some forward-type statements that never came to fruition, or have been severely delayed from what I had previously understood. So for me, it came down to over promising and under delivering, especially with BMW -- the single most important reason why I had invested in Axion to begin with.

     

    I'm not going to clobber Axion leadership here, only because here on the APCs that's been going on far too long to ignore. But I do feel let down.

     

    Do I think Axion is a good investment now? No.

     

    The covenants of this PIPE deal, and the extension state that no changes can be made until the PIPE deal is complete. In other words, the PIPErs have a significant say in what Axion can do.

     

    I'm purely guessing here, but if that huge deal came through, Axion can not raise capital for expansion purposes, until the PIPErs have been paid off. Most certainly another deal could be struck, but not without permission from the PIPErs. Hamstrung is the word that comes to mind.

     

    So the inference is two things: 1) The PIPErs are in control of what Axion can do 2) This is purely a personal opinion, or best guess, is that nothing significant is coming soon, henceforth the extension, which further dilutes the shares, and also has the potential to stifle any rise in share price, because the PIPErs have millions and millions of shares they can sell into any price rise. That's why I think the share price is in the "rocking chair" right now, and will continue to hover around ten cents, or perhaps with the new 9 cent trigger, it could go down there (or even farther if the PIPErs get greedy).

     

    I don't think the PIPErs want to kill the company, and to date there's been no sign that this is their intent, but I do think they want every drop of blood they can get.

     

    Further, and this is a personal matter to me, but I don't want to own Axion if there is no performance and the bonuses once again trigger for Axion leadership later this year.

     

    I have several times stated that Axion needs recurring sales to become a viable company, worthy of investment. Yes, a deal struck with BMW (or another OEM) for partnering with the licensing of Axion technology to make PbC, would be a huge win, and that would be worthy of once again taking the plunge (and not just dipping a toe).

     

    The PIPE extension is for me a big tell that nothing is going to happen anytime soon, because if something big did occur, Axion would need the PIPErs permission to move forward.

     

    Lastly, Axion will need to raise more money this year. Since Axion can't do anything until the PIPE deal is closed out, the timeframe from between when the PIPE deal is history, and the next capital raise will have to happen, was just shortened, significantly.

     

    One man's opinion...

     

    Hope this helps!
    9 Jan, 06:30 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    I think you're reading too much into the covenants at this point Maya. Axion can't take action that would put the PIPErs at a disadvantage, but they can certainly do something beneficial. In a worst case scenario, all a new deal would have to do is take the PIPErs out of the game, which wouldn't necessarily be a bad deal. When the debt was $9 million they had a strong hand. Now that the debt is more like $2 million, the hurdle isn't high at all.
    9 Jan, 07:08 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9630) | Send Message
     
    JP: I agree, and stated that another deal could be worked out. But still, Axion needs the PIPErs permission to do so.

     

    I would love to see that happen!
    9 Jan, 07:17 PM Reply Like
  • jcrjg
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    Thanks this is extremely helpful. Are you saying that the PIPERs can block new funding even if the new funding will pay off the old deal? That would be terrible.

     

    I mostly agree about management, though the bonus does not bother me. I would prefer they get a stock bonus even at the low price. My major complaint is that I don't think TG really understands the applications and so he does not know what to focus on. I also think he is very defensive about what has happened so he does not communicate well and probably does not really admit the true situation to himself. This is why he delayed the funding deal last year even though he was losing any leverage he might have had.

     

    My bet is that we will win in spite of management because fundamentally the technology is great.

     

    thanks.
    9 Jan, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • jcrjg
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    I think the issue of whether or not the PIPErs have to agree is a key one. That gives them a hug amount of power that could be used to extort a huge fraction of the company. If I interpret JP's statement correctly he thinks there agreement is not necessary. Has anyone else looked into this?
    9 Jan, 07:30 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Whenever a contract requires a counterpart's permission to do something positive or beneficial, the permission cannot be unreasonably withheld.
    9 Jan, 08:11 PM Reply Like
  • jcrjg
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    "Whenever a contract requires a counterpart's permission to do something positive or beneficial, the permission cannot be unreasonably withheld."

     

    Usually the contract will specify whether the permission cannot be unreasonably withheld or is at the sole and absolute discretion of one party.

     

    So this contract requires the PIPErs to consent even if they get paid?
    9 Jan, 09:04 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4720) | Send Message
     
    I think if you guys go back and look at the summaries of the docs, it says that if AXPW did a refinancing or equity sale stake then the PIPERS were to be a part of it at their option...I think this protected the PIPER's if some weird thing like what just happened with PLUG & somewhat guaranteed them their 20%+ profit.

     

    Either way I agree with JP, it made a lot of difference at $9M but not so much at $2M....
    9 Jan, 09:13 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    I haven't read the covenants in detail because I don't think its worth my time. A non-lawyer broker's comments to a non-lawyer client that get summarized on a message board several months later simply aren't enough to raise a red flag for me. If somebody points out a provision they think is problematic I'm willing to dig deeper. Until that happens I can't be bothered.
    9 Jan, 09:27 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2473) | Send Message
     
    jcrjg,

     

    Have you ever seen a big win in spite of management? Think sports or business? The PbC is great but only TG (or a successor) can help Axion find pay-dirt. I don't believe the oems will beat down Axion's door going forward. They may have found Axion on their own (years back) but so far it seems like they are yawning at what should be a slam dunk decision to move forward. Would a charismatic ceo help Axion's cause? Likely wouldn't hurt but then again maybe TG still has some skip in his step.
    9 Jan, 11:43 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2473) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    Was Axion the largest position in your portfolio? Sound like your broker got you out of what could have been a life/fiscal changing event.

     

    I used a fool (motley) for my broker (and counsel) and I was not so lucky to bail around 30 cents even though I had gotten my cost basis lowered a few months earlier during the pre-holidays of 2012.

     

    Luckily I unloaded some back in the run up of early 2012 but of course I kept some back in the hopes of OEM news. I now realize that news might be years away... still.
    10 Jan, 12:06 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Axion hadn't raised capital by the end of 2012, and then well into 2013, that Axion had lost it's leverage toward grinding out terms for a reasonable cap raise.

     

    Basically, I couldn't afford to lose more money on Axion, especially when the markets were on fire.

     

    I have all too many times heard from New Castle some forward-type statements that never came to fruition, or have been severely delayed from what I had previously understood. So for me, it came down to over promising and under delivering, especially with BMW -- the single most important reason why I had invested in Axion to begin with.

     

    I'm not going to clobber Axion leadership here, only because here on the APCs that's been going on far too long to ignore. But I do feel let down.

     

    Do I think Axion is a good investment now? No.

     

    The covenants of this PIPE deal, and the extension state that no changes can be made until the PIPE deal is complete. In other words, the PIPErs have a significant say in what Axion can do.

     

    2) This is purely a personal opinion, or best guess, is that nothing significant is coming soon, henceforth the extension, which further dilutes the shares, and also has the potential to stifle any rise in share price, because the PIPErs have millions and millions of shares they can sell into any price rise. That's why I think the share price is in the "rocking chair" right now, and will continue to hover around ten cents, or perhaps with the new 9 cent trigger, it could go down there (or even farther if the PIPErs get greedy).

     

    I don't think the PIPErs want to kill the company, and to date there's been no sign that this is their intent, but I do think they want every drop of blood they can get.

     

    Further, and this is a personal matter to me, but I don't want to own Axion if there is no performance and the bonuses once again trigger for Axion leadership later this year.

     

    All of these were included in my reasons for selling .. Doah!
    10 Jan, 12:31 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    "My major complaint is that I don't think TG really understands the applications."

     

    I have begun to believe this as well. Looking for mgt to give me a reason to believe otherwise. But any reasons are apparently locked up behind, in some cases, mythical NDAs.
    10 Jan, 12:34 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    John -

     

    "I haven't read the covenants in detail because I don't think its worth my time."

     

    Really? Given your tracking of Axion, I find that hard to believe. Knowing your methodical nature, I would imagine you have analyzed every part of it ... Otherwise, how could you have written articles on it?
    10 Jan, 12:36 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Bazooka -

     

    "The PbC is great" More and more I am wondering if this is just our assumption (ass out of u and me) based on propaganda or not. Waiting for the first real recurring buyer to assuage my doubts.
    10 Jan, 12:42 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Years and potentially reverse splits.
    10 Jan, 12:42 AM Reply Like
  • jcrjg
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    Have you ever seen a big win in spite of management?

     

    bazoooka,

     

    I think this happens all the time because "good management" is retroactively defined as who wins. There are numerous examples where people succeed at one thing and fail at another.

     

    I also don't think management is terrible. Based on what JP has said I don't think they are corrupt or lazy. I do think that understanding the potential applications is a difficult challenge and it is easy to be fooled by certain aspects of the technology that are truly great. One of the things that has been said on this board is could you do better? I don't think this is the right question because most people could not do better but that does not mean that TG and co are good enough to succeed or that there are better people for this stage of the company.
    10 Jan, 08:25 AM Reply Like
  • jcrjg
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    "The PbC is great" More and more I am wondering if this is just our assumption (ass out of u and me) based on propaganda or not.

     

    Stefan,

     

    My view is that it is very likely that the PbC is great. This is not 100%. It seems like the basic problem is that the PbC requires system level designs to take advantage of its benefits and that means adoption takes a long time. What we don't know is how long is a reasonable time. Management's biggest failure in my view is not getting enough buy in from the people who design the systems to support the company. For example many of the big auto makers have VC arms for exactly this kind of technology, why hasn't Axion got investment from them?

     

    With all of this I think the strategy is to have a small investment that you can afford to lose and then watch and have some funds available if things change. This is why I asked the question to Maya to whether he thought this was a reasonable approach. He only likes the second half of the strategy.
    10 Jan, 08:35 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    The other option, of course, is that Axion's management understands its markets well while many stockholders don't. Big companies don't devote significant time and money to following their testing and validation process for unacceptable components. We may not understand the requirements of their businesses but they do. When all else fails its useful to remember the customer is always right and the customer's process must be respected even if we think they should be satisfied with less information.

     

    ePower is tiny and nimble, so it can make decisions quickly. The other companies Axion is dealing with are lumbering giants who earned their status by doing things the right way even if it isn't the fastest way.
    10 Jan, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1901) | Send Message
     
    My doubts lie with the technology and the outside forces that no one can control regarding the technologies adoption into any market.

     

    The management has positioned the company to be profitable if/when the technology is adopted into a viable market. It is difficult for stockholders to see when so many companies around have taken the alternative route of selling their product "now" for below costs and jeopardizing ever becoming profitable, we have all witnessed many of those companies have their day in the sun but burn out quickly.
    10 Jan, 08:54 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    "My major complaint is that I don't think TG really understands the applications"

     

    I've wondered this in the past as well, but I think since Vani has shown up, Axion is much more focused on what the PbC can do and who they should be marketing it to. Now Vani and TG just have to earn their money and close some deals.
    10 Jan, 09:16 AM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1494) | Send Message
     
    "Axion's management understands its markets well..."

     

    John, with all due respect; I think this speculation rather than fact. In fact; we can point at a few instances that prove management grossly underestimated the time it takes to bring the technology to market. You personally pointed out that when Axion was incorporated; the idea was to get the PbC to an acceptable level of scalability in 24 months, which obviously didn't happen.

     

    I understand that TG's experience lies mainly in managing Real Estate partnerships, and negotiating with unions; and while these are fantastic skills to have and I command him for having taken Axion from where it started until today; I nonetheless believe he falls far short of being strategic and intuitive; two skills that are unfortunately a MUST for transitioning R&D companies into successful, commercial ones.

     

    In the prolonged absence of sales or if current partnerships go nowhere (hard to say when to come to the realisation, but it is clear legacy investors are becoming increasingly vocal and impatient); I would say it is time for the BoD to start looking for TG's successor.
    10 Jan, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    bazooka> Yes, I would say that there are definitely 'weeble' businesses out there. Those old enough will remember the commercial for the weeble toy that would "wobble but it won't fall down". Ah, back in the days when simple toys amused children.(editorial: was that better or worse?)

     

    Among businesses that mis-management might do a little damage but won't kill the top or bottom line: diversified branded consumer staples with powerful distributions ala P&G or Coke, niche industries like title insurance where competition isn't an effective tool, hard asset management like an oil driller with ample reserves or a residential REIT with low debt. (BP is doing pretty well now despite poor management costing tens of billions in damages). I love bombproof businesses and I'm always on the lookout for them.

     

    With sports teams, is it so much management or is it more that talented players want to go play with the other talented players? I don't know, just throwing it out there.
    10 Jan, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2110) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I am quite certain that TG DOES understand the applications. He has had many years to soak in the implications of the technology of the PbC. It is a battery and capacitor in one box that is cheaper then the equivalent as two pieces. The depths of the physics and electrochemistry of the electrolytic, porous carbon capacitor are over my head, but the uses of the PbC high power and durable charge acceptance features sure aren't.
    11 Jan, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (895) | Send Message
     
    I agree. In fact I think he gets it better than 95% of us. The problem he has is that every six months he feels that the large clients in transportation are no closer to actually ordering. Because of that he has to mention a new small niche just to keep us from dumping our shares.

     

    Axion's business model is to tie to 2 or 3 whales (ss auto, rail and trucking). He's been looking for a trucking partner probably for a few years and still probably looking for ss in trucking with something other than the class 8.
    12 Jan, 12:10 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    From what I've seen of Axion's power to make things happen with Cummins I think there's a very good chance it has a big red partner in stop-start for trucking and is well into the relationship. ePower tried to work with Cummins for years and got nowhere. Axion made a phone call and the result was an all hands meeting at Cummins test track with a platoon of their engineers in attendance.

     

    The mere fact that we of imperfect knowledge can't identify relationships doesn't mean that strong relationships of long standing don't exist.
    12 Jan, 01:11 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Well Cummins appears to know the value of asymmetric ubercapacitors. And a few others as well. Maybe they want to offer one that is not as expensive.

     

    http://bit.ly/1dfpkta

     

    http://bit.ly/1dfpmRz
    12 Jan, 01:21 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    Do you think Axion may have made any progress to date, perhaps secretly, about battery systems for trucks purely for aux power/anti-idling? It would seem to me that smaller battery packs that did not have to power drive train at all would be fairly simple to design and economical. Just charge off the alternator and discharge to run hotel load whenever you want to shut off the engine, simple no?

     

    With the anti-idling legislation this would seem a very large potential market that maybe Axion is overlooking unless I'm missing something. It's also a direct-to-consumer application that could have quick sales potential, something desperately needed.
    12 Jan, 01:29 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    There are two different classes of truck anti-idling applications.

     

    The first is in APUs, devices that are used to carry overnight hotel loads for hours when vehicles are sitting in a truck stop or rest area.

     

    The second is the normal stop-start we've come to know and love and the elimination of idling while a courier delivers a package.

     

    Granville has always been careful to distinguish between the two and my sense from his discussions is that the truck version of stop-start is both a bigger market and a better fit for the PbC. All those trucks you see running around town are very hard on their batteries and the PbC could be a strong contender in the market, particularly if Axion had a big red development partner.
    12 Jan, 04:24 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    SH -

     

    I am sure he does and keep hoping he can put all the pieces together. Just frustrated by the long time radio silence in the face of the suffering stock price.
    12 Jan, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    John, I know your/ePower's plate is obviously already pretty full.... but when I read this:

     

    "The first is in APUs, devices that are used to carry overnight hotel loads for hours when vehicles are sitting in a truck stop or rest area."

     

    And then note that in the ePower sleeper platform you've already got a 56-battery PbC string onboard with something like ~28 KWh of energy stored in it, well, it sure seems tempting to want to see that energy put to use in just such a fashion for those very hotel loads...
    14 Jan, 03:22 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Since the main battery pack operates at about 640 volts, it's easier to simply use an APU for low voltage hotel loads.
    14 Jan, 03:30 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    John, just for clarity, in this sense by APU, do you mean a separate, smaller battery bank (consisting possibly of some other type of battery than PbC), or some kind of small ICE generator?

     

    You say "low voltage" hotel loads, so I'm guessing currently the normal thing is that they're all driven at 12V DC? Or maybe 24 or 48V? Others are here who know a lot more about the various power conversion electronics that are available... but I would have to imagine a device exists somewhere (or can be designed) that can take a variable input of say 480V-640V DC (at low amperage) and then (invert, transform, rectify?) that down to a decent 12V or 24V output...

     

    I don't mean to test your patience. It certainly could be that maybe it's more trouble than it's worth, that maybe the efficiency would be too horrible, or that maybe it would just cost too much... but ISTM that one of the main hurdles to PbC employment in a whole host of novel applications is the fact that typically, loads want to be driven at near constant voltage, whereas the PbC discharges its useful energy with a steadily declining voltage profile...

     

    Thus, the sooner and better the code is cracked to deliver a cheap, seamless, efficient power-conversion solution for bridging that gap, the more widely employable the PbC will become for a much greater range of applications... Not exactly low-hanging fruit I know, but since ePower is boldly going where no man has gone before when it comes to series-hybrid electric drive, why not (when the time is right) auxiliary power? ;)
    14 Jan, 03:58 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    The normal APU is a 48-volt system that typically uses four AGM batteries in series. Every bit of hardware you add to a system adds another potential failure mechanism and some complexities that seem desirable at first blush are more trouble than they're worth. This is one of them.
    14 Jan, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    Thanks John, and fair enough. I'll take off my PITA hat for now and keep my peace. ;) (and get off the dang old concentrator)

     

    But I suspect we're going to see that the same basic question and root issue is going come up again and again in various guises and locales (not necessarily just for ePower or this specific application) and, well, I guess we'll just see how it plays out as things evolve in the years ahead. PbC as a class of device, (we hope) will be a growing fact of life going forward in the vast electrical landscape. Its unique hybrid-capacitor discharge profile is one of the very things that puts it in its own distinct class. So it will have to be dealt with successfully. I mean, if the need for the PbC is great enough, for whatever application, the electronics will have to evolve to deal with it. Now clearly, for the main drive, NS and ePower itself have found a way to accommodate it. As presumably did Rosewater with their Hub. Because the other virtues of the PbC are just that compelling. So all things in time. ISTM the road to any new success is very often paved first with rough stones... (ePower itself is testament to that right now)... but then later invariably come the smoother ones..

     

    PITA out. ;)
    14 Jan, 04:32 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    48, there is certainly a right or wrong conclusion to be obtained for your thoughts concerning integrating the UPS function into the drive train storage IMO and John may be perfectly right that it doesn't make sense. ePower might have already thought of it for some time as Jay seems like just the sort of fellow that would do so. After all, like with grid storage, the more you can come up with for functional uses of your asset the better the tool box for justifying the expenditure.

     

    I can surely sense John's caution about adding risk to the operation of the drive train for UPS function and it is certainly nothing to be taken lightly. You'll find truckers on the road that sure don't like the MTBF that's been handed to them on newer drive trains based on forced government regs.

     

    All that being said, like with SS, it's one for the TBD file or "For the future" as far as understanding feasibility. Gotta take care of the meat and potatoes first and then worry about dessert later. Been there, done that.

     

    All just my opinion and I'll join you in the just thinkin PITA dugout!
    14 Jan, 07:24 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    John> Thanks, yes I was referring to the truck stop or rest stop anti idling function. A lot of truckers apparently pull over to catch 40 winks and idle the truck so they can power heat or A/C or whatnot.

     

    My understanding is that legislators are trying to apply pressure to cut down this idling for hours. Now if I were an independent trucker that could not consider affording a slick new $50,000 ePower hybrid retrofit, I might still be in the market for a battery pack of a few PbCs that would run my A/C for a few hours while I slept in the cab.

     

    Just to toss out numbers, admittedly uneducated, if a pack of 2 to 4 PbCs could run my A/C and any gadgetry for several hours with no drain to my primary LAB, thus preserving it, the diesel savings and peace and quiet might easily justify $1000-$2000 outlay for said PbC APU. Maybe the entry level unit being 2 PbCs with control electronics for something like $1000. Yes I'm just making up numbers, but I think the market would be quite sizable for such an APU and perhaps more importantly it would bypass all the OEMs and Multlinks of the world to go straight to the consumer for some *quick* sales.

     

    Whether the PbC is a good fit for running hotel load (A/C being the big drain) for the amount of time a trucker might be in an unmoving truck (8 hours?) is a question for engineers, but what we do know is that low SOC won't hurt the PbCs so they could be drained down practically 100%, and they would recharge quickly upon the truck restarting. Certainly ready for the next break a few hours down the road.

     

    Another benefit would be to get an Axion brand presence out in the trucking world which would help bring some attention to ePower.
    14 Jan, 08:53 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2203) | Send Message
     
    This brings to my mind the sailboats we rented in Belize last month. 38.5 foot catamarans, with two engines, one in each hull, and humongous marine batteries for each engine and a separate battery system for house functions, including all the electronics, navigation, refrigeration, ventilation and lighting. It made good sense to keep them entirely independent on rental boats. We had to run the engines daily for a certain time to charge all the systems, but then could spend the rest of the day enjoying the music of wind and waves without the engine noise.

     

    You do not want some bleary-eyed tourists waking up as their anchor drags and they are floating toward breakers on the reef, only to find that their engines won't start because they ran down the batteries blasting the Grateful Dead for all of the tropical paradise to enjoy all night.

     

    It makes good sense to idiot-proof the electronics with separate or redundant systems when your livelihood or life may depend on it.
    14 Jan, 09:02 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, sticking my head out of the dugout for one more sec, I can't say I fundamentally disagree as to preserving the primacy of the drivetrain function. Coming from the aviation world, certain systems are life itself, and you don't want the tail wagging the dog right down into a smoking hole just because the mfg wanted to attach some "nice to have" bells and whistles to vital functions. An added bell or whistle that somehow causes a failure in a vital primary system is a *very bad thing*.

     

    So for my money, KISS is always pretty solid as a design philosophy starting point.

     

    But in the case of a series-hybrid sleeper cab truck, for instance, where I would think space is at something of a high premium (after already having had to find the room for 4x boxes of 14 PbC's), and where super robust hotel functions might be an additional selling point, I would think there might be at least some value in exploring a way to eliminate the extra bulk and cost of a wholly separate (and perhaps inferior) APU system based on conventional LA. After all, Four AGMs and their associated electronics probably cost ~$1000 already, and take up not a little space. And who knows what frequency of replacement schedule they experience, given the depth of discharge likely to be incurred in heavy use with only ~4 KWh or so of stored energy to work with...

     

    Thus *IF* it could be done properly, (ie safely and cheaply) somehow using the main bank of massive PbC storage that's already there present, well, it makes sense to me. And it just seems more elegant. That's all I'm saying. But I concur *heartily* that it's definitely something only *for the future*. First things first.

     

    back to the dugout. ;)
    14 Jan, 10:04 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    48> I would imagine you are onto to something with utilizing the PbC bank as an APU. In my small understanding of things electric, I thought you could always step voltage down through a transformer to a safe lower voltage, like the little boxy plug-ins sticking out of receptacles all over my house.

     

    Why not stick a transformer on the PbC string output that steps down to the proper voltage to run the hotel load? In fact with 56 PbCs of juice on board, why even have a LAB to crank the starter as the 56 PbCs in concert should easily be able to turn it over, even at low PSOC? I'm probably naive on the complexities but I do like to theorize ...
    14 Jan, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    RA, appreciate the support. My level of understanding is limited as well. Fairly grounded in some basics, but I know enough to appreciate (and be humbled by) how deep, and vast, and mathematically complex is the subject. To my thinking, electricity is at the very heart of nature itself. Anyway, transformers, ie the little boxy plug in things.. well, they only work with AC, alternating current. The undulating waves of energy therein provide a very nifty way to magnetically couple input to output, and by varying the ratio of primary winding turns to secondary winding turns, the output voltage can be stepped up or down to nearly anything you like. But again, only with AC. No bueno with DC, which is what a battery produces.. so the electronics have to get a bit more complicated in order to effectively step down voltage from ~640V to 48V and do it without ungodly losses... The engineers here know a lot more than me. I'm confident it can be done in some fashion, but whether it can be done well enough, that I cannot say. John puts it in the realm of more trouble than it's worth, and with him being much closer to the problem, I certainly acknowledge that he may prove to be right...
    14 Jan, 10:57 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Does anyone know why we don't know who has the recent PowerCube?
    8 Jan, 10:59 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I'll take a stab at that. And BTW, I'm disappointed as well due to lack of a name if that's part of the reason for your post.

     

    Imagine you are two, minimum, partners in an opportunity that has tons of competitors that are desperate for clues regarding how to find advantage. Or you are one of the two partners that think you've found an advantage but you're not sure of your partners contribution so you don't want to risk your reputation. Just a couple thoughts.

     

    I'm hoping Axion is a minnow that found a conservative whale in this area but who knows.

     

    Truth be known, Axion has huge headwinds irrespective of any tech. advantage it might have. The old " Nobody got fired for choosing IBM thing.
    8 Jan, 11:33 PM Reply Like
  • Nathan Kemalyan MD
    , contributor
    Comments (506) | Send Message
     
    The whale could be the state of California, driving the intermittent renewable power agenda, producing a market for brown-out protection for all those companies whose computer systems and production lines can't tolerate expensive interruptions during peak power usage times. Maybe it's time for AXPW to open up that west coast office?
    Forget semiconductor fabs...I'm thinking about Target, performing minute by minute analysis of buyer trends from the cash register scanners, pushing e-coupons over mobile media, eking out a few extra percentage points in summer ice cream sales across the western US from those hot July 5 p.m. home-going shoppers and then "poof", the brown-out resets the server and the last 15 minutes of data is lost, costing the company a couple million in sales. Bring on that power cube!
    Probably just fantasy, but it's nice to daydream now and again.
    9 Jan, 12:11 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    The recent rulings re' storage being a required part of renewables projects in California made that state appear to be a good candidate, but then I read the PowerCube was sent to a client, specifically a commercial entity, with whom AXPW had a long-established relationship, IIRC. That suggests to me a local destination, another installation on the PJM grid perhaps.
    9 Jan, 12:34 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    I don't expect the CA mandate to ramp up quickly ... it is back-end loaded towards 2016-2020 and gives a bunch of leeway for the utilities to wiggle.
    9 Jan, 01:04 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (434) | Send Message
     
    Ed, I think the phrase they used was " somewhere in N America". That's really pinning it down huh. :)
    9 Jan, 01:41 AM Reply Like
  • Nathan Kemalyan MD
    , contributor
    Comments (506) | Send Message
     
    "with whom Axion had a long-established relationship"...either one of those many NDA partners or one of a very few previously named partners, but not willing to name the transaction. If I were just a bit more of a conspiracy theorist, I'd say the NSA is buying a power cube for it's ultra-secret servers.
    This battery storage story has the aura of in international spy novel about it.
    There are only so many stationary energy storage products out there that can be shipped and installed at this point (I'm guessing less than the number of my fingers, including the flywheels); who's fooling whom about trying to capture the lion's share of a "market that isn't", quite yet. They attend the same industry conferences, shake the same hands in the vendor fairs; there are certainly a lot of commercial enterprises that might want to manage their power supply behind the meter. Were I at the front end of a potentially endless market, I'd want to be a visible first-mover, rather than a stealthy spy.
    9 Jan, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    My blog is now updated for EOD 1/8/14.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    9 Jan, 07:51 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Cummins seems to be tapping the brakes on its long-haul CNG efforts.

     

    http://bit.ly/1abl5u6

     

    “Reality and Confidence in Reality’

     

    “My gut feeling is that most of the people buying the 12-liter today have dedicated fueling,” East says – or run regular point-to-point routes. “The customer base demanding the 15-liter engine is more likely to run variable routes,” he says. “They need to be confident that they can stop at a public station.”
    9 Jan, 07:59 AM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1828) | Send Message
     
    'Just not sure on when'

     

    In a weird way, the development of a market for the natural gas engine might be good for Axion. Long term.

     

    More natural gas engines on the roads means higher natural gas demand and, therefore, a higher equilibrium price for natural gas.

     

    Higher natural gas prices makes the ePower hybrid with Axion(TM) Inside an even better solution from a cost-benefit perspective. Just not sure on when.

     

    D
    9 Jan, 07:39 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1259) | Send Message
     
    That is interesting and has to be encouraging to hybrid sellers such as ePower.

     

    I always found ePower's focus on OTR trucks to be a move that contradicted conventional wisdom. The CW says hybrids are for stop and go routes. But those routes tend to be local and CNG is a much easier sell when you manage a local fleet and can fuel up at your own pump every night. CNG is all the rage and hybrid sellers have to fight against the current now.

     

    ePower appears to be facing far less competition in the OTR market!

     

    (PS "gut feeling' is a funny choice of words. Surely this guy has access to the latest and greatest market research.)
    9 Jan, 09:29 AM Reply Like
  • obieephyhm
    , contributor
    Comments (1567) | Send Message
     
    I just remembered the old saw about the Light at the End of the Tunnel . . . you know -- the one that goes, "I thought I saw the Light at the End of the Tunnel . . . but it turned out to be an oncoming train . . ."

     

    Then I realized -- yeah, that'd be good, too!!!
    9 Jan, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • tahoe1780
    , contributor
    Comments (96) | Send Message
     
    Solar deployment: http://bit.ly/1ajhDBc
    9 Jan, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • tahoe1780
    , contributor
    Comments (96) | Send Message
     
    Long rhubarb: http://bit.ly/1lQIjuN
    9 Jan, 01:12 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Used on the latest GM "Yank Tank" as well.

     

    VW uses cylinder deactivation to increase Passat's fuel efficiency

     

    http://exm.nr/1iWKyzM
    9 Jan, 01:32 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    IINDelco,
    Honda has been using a similar system on the Odyssey since 2005. It is one of the reasons why the Odyssey gets better highway mpg than the Toyota Sienna or the Highlander, even though they basically use the same 3.5L engine and weigh about the same.
    9 Jan, 08:14 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Thanks LabTech, I know it's pretty well developed at this time. I'm surprised it's not used more often.
    9 Jan, 08:28 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    IINDelco,
    I don't really know why it hasn't caught on more. I do know that the Odyssey can't tow as much as the Highlander so maybe there is a drawback on using this system if you are towing more weight? Also, it probably doesn't make as big of a difference on smaller vehicles and so the added cost of the system would be harder to squeeze out of a smaller, cheaper car, than a giant Honda van that can easily cost $10-20K more.
    9 Jan, 10:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    LabTech, Can't be towing capacity if GM is putting it on full sized trucks. Certainly it makes more sense for vehicles that have higher displacement engines that are only used on occasion like a large V8. There is cost involved so higher petrol prices probably made the efforts worthwhile again after some earlier disasters like GM's 4-6-8 Cadillac disaster. My guess is better electromechanical controls, fuel injection and computer advancements made the second time a charm.
    9 Jan, 11:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    BMW Suffers Big Setback Against Tesla in California

     

    "NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- BMW's (Xetra:BMW) Tesla-challenger, the i3, was engineered to get special regulatory status in California to enable it to compete effectively against the Tesla (TSLA_) Model S. Just in time for BMW's customers to start placing their orders, this critical BMW selling point has been removed, resulting in a huge victory for Tesla as well as BMW's other competitors."

     

    http://bit.ly/1bW1xcR
    9 Jan, 03:08 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    It seemed a bit unfair that BMW had gotten the law tailored to their new i3. That being said, I would really like to hear an explanation from California regulators as to why they felt it right to change the rules after the fact? Other than the obvious fact that Tesla's plant is in California.
    9 Jan, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    The whole read is disgusting, IMHO. Notice it's not about making a better car, it's about jumping through gov't hoops and seeing who's better at playing the system. If electric car sales are that dependent on HOV stickers then what does that say? And if 40,000 green stickers are so good for the environment, then why limit them? Anyway, hire yourself a bunch of bureaucrats and then overpay and over empower them, and this is what you get---dozens of fat thumbs on the scale and a host of artificial constraints and limitations that have nothing to do with sound vehicle design or economics. If the state of california wants to discourage gasoline use, fine, then jack up the gas tax and call it a day, and then let the auto companies compete *in the engineering space* to deliver the best vehicles to their customers.

     

    But then of course that would mean a lot less to do for the legions of busybodies in sacralento....
    9 Jan, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • renim
    , contributor
    Comments (1068) | Send Message
     
    if the following is from BMW, then there was no change of rules after the fact.

     

    'The i3 with Range Extender qualifies for the green sticker, which is limited in numbers and will run out in the eventual future (possibly late in 2014). This is technically to be expected since the car is equipped with an internal combustion engine which potentially emits fuel fumes, and thus makes it harder to qualify for the white sticker which typically can be obtained by full battery-electric vehicles (BEV) and Hydrogen vehicles. The white sticker is not limited in terms of numbers. There is a continued, constructive relationship between BMW and CARB executives, and there has been no reversal of position. It also bears mention that the i3 with Range Extender qualifies for the full CA incentive amount of $2,500 – so the statement in the original article that the owners will not receive CA state incentive money is also wrong.'

     

    http://bit.ly/1eJMaaR
    9 Jan, 08:20 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1209) | Send Message
     
    Strong price action into the close! We went from about 400k volume to about 740k in very short order.

     

    I wonder if there was a "leak" somewhere?
    9 Jan, 04:12 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    New York Plans $40M in Prizes for Storm-Resilient Microgrids

     

    Can $40 million bootstrap more than ten community microgrid projects across the state?

     

    Jeff St. John
    January 9, 2014

     

    http://bit.ly/JL7ZNC

     

    "The projects are meant to support communities of about 40,000 residents and to operate in conjunction with the grid most of the time.

     

    ...

     

    It’s a more indirect route than that taken by neighboring Connecticut, which in 2012 created a statewide microgrid program. In August, the state dedicated $18 million to fund nine projects. Connecticut is considered the leader in the region in terms of microgrid support, although other governments are putting funds behind emergency backup power and community energy sufficiency. New Jersey, for example, is partnering with the Department of Energy on a $1 million study aimed at supplying microgrid capabilities for New Jersey Transit, and New York City is studying a microgrid project for the Rockaway Peninsula as part of its climate change response plan

     

    ....

     

    One of the key challenges for the microgrids as grid resilience resources is the fact that they’ve got to find ways to pay for themselves that extend beyond keeping the lights on during emergencies. But many of those alternative revenue streams can come into conflict with existing regulations, not to mention posing a threat to utility business models that rely on selling power to customers"
    9 Jan, 04:27 PM Reply Like
  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (163) | Send Message
     
    "Strong price action into the close! We went from about 400k volume to about 740k in very short order."

     

    And the rise in price suggests that deals were soaking up the asks. Buying rather than selling it seems.
    9 Jan, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    01/09/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from the blog (up now).
    # Trds: 98, MinTrSz: 23, MaxTrSz: 145000, Vol: 934373, AvTrSz: 9534
    Min. Pr: 0.1000, Max Pr: 0.1055, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1024
    # Buys, Shares: 25 266450, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1022
    # Sells, Shares: 73 667923, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1024
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:2.51 (28.52% "buys"), DlyShts 162000 (17.34%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 24.25%

     

    Strange day. First, as you can see in the trading breakdown by time we had relatively weak price action through 15:53. And it wasn't due to ARCA as they were only in at 15:06 and were gone by 15:08. They didn't drop the offer much either, $0.1025 before ARCA and $0.1015 was their bid. In the last seven minutes we traded about 53% of the day's volume, including the two AH trades, with VWAPs rising from $0.1010 ending at 15:53 to $0.1023, $0.1033, $0.1047 and $0.1050 in those four periods.

     

    Unfortunately, the buying percentage didn't follow suit – the big trades at the end were 0% buys.

     

    We had a few unusually large blocks that skewed results today. Nine trades greater than 15K accounted for 398,500 shares, 42.65% of the day's volume. If we remove just the two largest trades of the day, 101K and 145K, our VWAP drops to $0.1018, up 0.83% from yesterday's VWAP instead of the actual 1.40% we ended with. This also affected our average trade size, one of the things for which I track the trend as an indicator of coming price action. Without those two large trades we had an average trade size of 7,171 instead of 9,534. If I remove the 9 trades greater than 15K (seems reasonable since 89 trades were 15K or smaller), our average trade size would be 5,684.

     

    Sans the 101K and 145K sells, our buy percentage would have been 38.71%.

     

    The daily short sales percentage stuck with the script today – a leg down ...

     

    The average of the lowest 20 VWAPs times 80% today is $0.0834 vs. $0.0838, $0.0846, $0.0849 and $0.0852 on prior days. 80% of today's VWAP is $0.0819 vs. $0.0808, $0.0809, $0.0831 and $0.0798 on prior days. These are potential prices for the next tranche of shares to the PIPErs.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved 0.00%, 3.53%, 1.40%, 74.58% and -1.34% respectively. Price spread today was 1.90%, vs. 5.80% and 8.08% prior days.

     

    On the traditional TA stuff, the high today peaked just above that new short-term descending resistance I mentioned I constructed yesterday. We also closed with a higher high, and VWAP, on rising volume. In normal times, positive signs. But we know we are not in normal times and we've received plenty of false signals before. Keep in mind the discussion of the trading in the last 7 minutes vs. the rest of the day (see the trading breakdowns and my comments on them). I said yesterday if we try and move up, we'll have to consider this line as potential resistance. Today closed above it on strong volume. If we can do the same tomorrow, we might actually have something to get excited about.

     

    Contrary to yesterday, the oscillators I watch, except MFI and accumulation and distribution, flipped from suggesting weakness to trying to improve. None are showing strength yet, but they are trying. However, I must continue my “Debbie Downer” role – we've had volatility like this too many times to get all giddy just yet.

     

    My caution seems somewhat supported by the buy percentage, which had picked up a tad from Tuesday's 27.5% to 32.8% yesterday. Even with ARCA almost essentially a no-show, we saw a reduced buy percentage today, 28.5%. However, sans the 101K and 145K sells, our buy percentage would have been 38.71%, a decent number. What I think will happen is we'll return to the recent “normal” behavior seen since the advent of the PIPErs.

     

    The usual stats and commentary in in the blog here.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    9 Jan, 08:34 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Sorry guys, I can't help the snarky comments anymore. Can't deal with getting my head smacked anymore. I'm already going bald.

     

    *please give me a reason to quit talking shit.
    10 Jan, 12:44 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1500) | Send Message
     
    Stefan,
    http://bit.ly/1iXrKjL
    10 Jan, 02:57 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Haha. Love the old SNL stuff.
    10 Jan, 10:17 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I was thinking that I love the new Saturday Night Live stuff as well. lol
    10 Jan, 10:27 AM Reply Like
  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (163) | Send Message
     
    Dr Love,

     

    Thanks for the detailed trading description. I have never seen trading in a company tracked so closely before. I was wondering if you could answer a couple of questions from a technical novice. What is ARCA and VWAP? Also how are the buys and sells percentages calculated? I dont understand how the 5% rise in price at the end of the day can not be at the ask price I am assuming a buyer accepting an ask price is a buy? and a seller accepting a bid price is a sell? Or am I way off the mark?

     

    Thanks
    10 Jan, 04:53 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    I'm not a Dr. I am hard to love I think.

     

    Dance621: VWAP = Volume Weighted Average Price. ARCA is a market-maker code, in this case the code for the ARCA exchange, one of the NYSE owned ones IIRC.

     

    The buys and sells are a classification of trades based on hitting the bid or hitting the ask, or in a few cases being *very* close to the bid or ask. I enter every trade's price and quantity in the spreadsheet and whether it's a buy or sell and time. Then the formulas do the heavy lifting by dividing the buy, sell or unknown quantity by total trade volume.

     

    The rise at EOD is a result of rising bids. Often the sellers will see this and back off (rise) the offers some, allowing more room for the bid to rise. If there's buyers who want to get filled they tend to walk the bids up and those sellers that want to get rid of the shares for share will tend to hit those rising bids.

     

    There are some times when the bid and ask are 1/100th of a penny apart and then there's no wiggle room. I even saw a day or two ago a locked market (bid and ask were the same, but no trades were made) for a few minutes.

     

    Your "buyer accepting" and "seller accepting" is correct.

     

    The *potential* utility of these metrics for gauging sentiment changes, not intra-day but over time, is what drew my experimental nature to try and use them. If I was better educated we might have a new whiz-bang indicator already, but for me it's a trial-and-error process with some help and ideas contributed by others.

     

    HTH,
    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    HTL, sorry brother, you can't shake a callsign. Especially one so perfect...

     

    Dr. Love it is! ;)
    10 Jan, 02:37 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1209) | Send Message
     
    @HTL... I think your new moniker should be Dr. Strangelove! What do you think?
    10 Jan, 02:52 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    O.R.: I thought of that soon as Dance621 called me "Dr.".

     

    But I think it's too radical for me. Gave up riding around in/on potential "bombs" when I sold my '59 Plymouth w/361 c.i. V8 and swing-out bucket seats (chocolate leather too).

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 03:01 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Sorry HTL, I tried to forget about it but 48 brought it up again.

     

    http://bit.ly/1ktMzFj
    10 Jan, 03:27 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    HTL,you're not a doctor, you just play one on the APC...
    10 Jan, 04:26 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    LoL! Yep! And I'm working on playing an independently wealthy man of leisure next! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 05:03 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    HTL, that has a nice ring to it...."wealthy man of leisure..." I could get into that!!
    10 Jan, 05:11 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    ever the realist, at this point I'm willing to settle for "wealthy man of leisure suit"....
    10 Jan, 05:13 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    As Jack Benny would say. "Now THAT's Funny!!" If you know who Jack Benny was...
    10 Jan, 05:26 PM Reply Like
  • obieephyhm
    , contributor
    Comments (1567) | Send Message
     
    I don't suppose there's an argument for being an "independent man of leisurely wealth" ....????
    10 Jan, 05:29 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    48: Lol! Going retro? Back to the 70s?

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 05:30 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    Now Rochester!

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 05:30 PM Reply Like
  • Mac325
    , contributor
    Comments (19) | Send Message
     
    It appears we can cross the Las Vegas Sign Solar Project off of the PC sale speculation list. This article mentions there is no storage capability being used:

     

    http://bit.ly/KIAVpJ

     

    "The system that kicked into action this week alongside the iconic, 55-year-old sign at the south end of Las Vegas Boulevard consists of three solar “trees” – arrays of panels perched on poles. Each tree has six 265-watt SolarWorld panels, giving the entire system a generating capacity of 4.77 kilowatts of power, according to designer Bombard Renewable Energy. But of course, the sign is most obviously lit up at night, and with no energy storage capability attached to the solar trees, they won’t be feeding electricity to the Fabulous sign after dark."
    10 Jan, 09:28 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    As I read the article, the trees make enough energy to run the lights 24hr/day, but with no batteries they are just feeding the rest of the power into the local grid and then the sign has to take electricity back out of the grid at night to power the lights.

     

    I'm not really surprised this wasn't the application. It didn't really fit the description of the user and their application in my mind.
    10 Jan, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (895) | Send Message
     
    That is an interesting article. I was the person to bring it forward at the time. The project was a few years in the making and initial documents all had required battery storage.
    10 Jan, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    mrholty,

     

    Maybe, since it was all paid for with other groups money, those groups didn't want to foot the bill for the batteries too.
    10 Jan, 01:39 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Maybe the politicians just didn't have anyone smart enough to convince the Cadillac dealers association that they would also need free batteries to time shift the solar energy to make it a REALLY smart idea. Oh well, they got a great fluff piece photo op next to a well recognized landmark without it costing the taxpayers anything for their self promotion.
    10 Jan, 01:52 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    ARCA on the *buy* side @ $0.108!

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 09:36 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    This morning PLUG announced a $30 million placement of common stock and warrants priced at $3 per unit. Each unit consisted of a share of common stock and a $4 warrant. When you consider that PLUG's 200-day VWMA was $0.44 on December 1st, the offering is a great object lesson on how financing dynamics can change when momentum shifts from fear based to greed based.

     

    http://yhoo.it/KILM2X
    10 Jan, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Very interesting placement.
    10 Jan, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    In the micro-cap world emotions are everything. If you look at Plug's 9-30-13 financial statements they were in pretty poor condition with equity comparable to Axion's and a nine month loss of $34 million.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/1a6CE1D

     

    Their current market cap is $384 million and the announcement of a $3 placement has pushed the price to $3.74 and climbing.
    10 Jan, 10:45 AM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (507) | Send Message
     
    PLUG hit an air pocket yesterday possibly due to a seeking alpha article linked below that is highly critical of the company. That article's companion piece came out this morning (I believe) and is also linked below.

     

    I've developed a little bit of familiarity with PLUG in recent weeks. That is nothing like my understanding of Axion so take "...little bit" with a shaker of salt. My take is that the article has a number of valid points polluted by what is obviously a one-sided viewpoint. It would seem that if the author believed his own hype his fair value estimate for the company would be far lower than it is.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    The financing at what seems like a very favorable price will probably trump the second article, which has a number of very damaging quotes from non-attributed customers. Yes, I can understand why the quotes can't be attributed but the author's one-sided approach would certainly seem to bring into question the completeness, if not the veracity of his quotes.

     

    One question I have is that the author's assessment of the economics of the PLUG fork lift kit is based largely on whether a six minute refueling has to take place once every eight hours or once every four hours (vs. once per six hours for batteries which I assume is a change out not a recharge as he describes).

     

    Honestly, it is very clear in my mind that a customer wouldn't adopt hydrogen-powered fork lifts because they thought the refueling cycle would be 8 hours instead of 6 for batteries. Furthermore, that is the kind of thing that would become very apparent on the first day of testing, not something that would take years and years of testing to become apparent.

     

    My Axion-related point is that while the products are different, the psychology of our Axion investment is pretty similar to the psychology of being a PLUG investor. Yes, when the momentum shifts, the impact on the stock price can be huge. Also, it is clear that the waters are not clear and the issues and anxiety that Stefan describes are and will continue to be real even if what we think we know about Axion is true. That is, while light shines on part of the Axion story, it is very clear that large amounts of the story are in shadow, if not outright darkness.

     

    That is the way that investing is. JP shines a whole lot of light on Axion but he also obscures a little bit as well because he's human. This concentrator also shines a lot of light. Nevertheless, there's still plenty of room for individual judgement and luck. To a large extent we have to trust TG the way PLUG investors have to trust Andy Marsh. Most investors don't know these men and we have to hope the CEOs and their teams are competent, honorable, well-connected, and lucky.

     

    I favor the approach of digging up as much information as possible and discussing it from all angles, including positive and negative, but I acknowledge that the water will never be clear and even if Axion is successful we'll always have to struggle with fair value vs. the stock price at that time.

     

    10 Jan, 11:04 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1901) | Send Message
     
    I went through Plugs SEC filings to see if I could gleam anything that would give insight into how the stock performed over the past two years. Interestingly our good friend Austin Wolfe Marxe (aka Special Situations partner) held 8M shares until Feb, 14th 2012 when Plug announced a $2.4M offering issuing 18M shares with Roth Capital Partners as the book-runner -- the 50-day WMA at .50 about a 70% discount. An SEC filing a week later shows Special Sits sold 7M shares that day, total volume skyrocketed to 27M about 8x its previous high volume day of 3 million over a year before that and the stock closed the day at .12.

     

    A couple months later Roth himself is named to the Board of Directors. A few months after that in Sept.they do a $10M offering at .54, while the 50-day WMA was .49 and their 100-day WMA was .43 -- this $10M offering goes off at a premium to the 50-day WMA. Over the next few months the stock soars 600%....fascinating.

     

    Axion needs a sugar mama, and I need to become a book-runner.
    10 Jan, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    Axion needs to get in line. Trust me, I got dibs on the first sugar mama in the door. the need is that great.
    10 Jan, 02:41 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    Regarding fuel cells as a device class, I think this quote direct from one of their customers is quite telling:

     

    "Some of our operators can outwork the fuel cell. These are guys that really know how to work a lift. The fuel cell can't keep up with the workload and you end up having to stop. This is more down time."

     

    When (s)he says: "...the fuel cell can't keep up..." I believe what they're talking about is power. The fuel cell may have lots of energy to provide at a steady rate, but without oversizing, it is limited in its ability to deliver that energy at rate sufficient to the application...
    10 Jan, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1488) | Send Message
     
    I agree, and...The sentiment for the entire group of fuel cell (there are 4) companies is supporting greed for shares of all the companies and each announcement from any of the companies causes all the companies to be more desirable and thus, move up.

     

    To get sector sentiment in a similar manner, we probably need to be associated with other small battery companies, or the like, so people can see that there is a sector to invest in as well as a company.
    11 Jan, 04:54 PM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1488) | Send Message
     
    48-where did you get a quote like that?
    11 Jan, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    Doc, it's from the second Akston article:

     

    http://bit.ly/1dcHtaM

     

    About 3 inches below the second table...
    11 Jan, 06:54 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    If it keeps up, this will be a huge volume day. 1.2 million shares and only 11 a.m. Numerous big buys. What gives?
    10 Jan, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (654) | Send Message
     
    Just a guess: The PIPErs appear to at least be working to keep the price above .10 to avoid another price failure. The last few days they appear to even be buying to avoid a below $40,000 day failure. Others from the sidelines are beginning to step in after seeing the price hold at .10+. There is also the possibility that others may have inside knowledge of the PCs, NSC, or BMW.
    10 Jan, 11:07 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Apparently, there was just a NS999 sighting on the board ...
    10 Jan, 12:38 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (895) | Send Message
     
    Wha?
    10 Jan, 12:40 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, Details? What board?
    10 Jan, 01:06 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Since there was no link I suspect that Stefan may have been feeling a little snarkish.
    10 Jan, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1209) | Send Message
     
    @jveal: My guess is the latter: some type of insider knowledge...
    10 Jan, 02:57 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    ii - not even being snarkish ... Edward Metcalfe's photo.
    10 Jan, 04:02 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Very observant Stefan - Gold Star.
    10 Jan, 04:09 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Would have been worth a palladium star if he noticed my name wasn't Edward.
    :)
    10 Jan, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Oh, Thanks Stefan. I guess I didn't put two and two together since that has been his moniker picture for some time. Or was that another Axionista as I remember seeing it b4.

     

    Well, Ya had me excited anyway!
    10 Jan, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    I make a quick search for new images of the NS999 virtually every day. I had a train set as a kid, built by my Dad some 50 years ago. It's been handed down a generation, There's just something I really enjoy about the big heavies, like earthmovers, defensive linemen, locomotives etc.

     

    Here's a look at the landing gear of the world's biggest cargo plane - the thing weighs ~600 tons and can lift off carrying ~300 tons payload. Unbelievable.
    http://bit.ly/1cLD5hY
    10 Jan, 04:54 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    haha, sorry, Edmund.
    10 Jan, 05:01 PM Reply Like
  • axion-nl
    , contributor
    Comments (142) | Send Message
     
    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="nl"><p>... | Axion Power is now commercializing its battery technology and providing solutions to the trucking and rail: http://bit.ly/1a6MbFV;/p>&mdash; Rudy Barrio (@barrio10010) 7 januari 2014</blockquote>
    <script async src="//platform.twitte... charset="utf-8"></script>
    10 Jan, 11:39 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1a6PZqB

     

    Link to "OurRegionsBusiness" interview with TG published 01Jan2014; TG refers to a solar customer in NJ with PJM hook-up. Also mentions a 37% fuel savings with E-Power. Ranging interview, just a few minutes.
    10 Jan, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4453) | Send Message
     
    Preparing for a very steep climb. I guess that is better than a bounce in the step. Still, since data is so scarce & too precious to share, the only thing of interest to me is ink on paper ... be that manufacturing alliance or (be still my heart) actual sales.
    10 Jan, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    That was a solid interview and well worth watching. While I'm not often kind to Axion's PR efforts, Tom's presentation has gotten a lot smoother over the years without a hint of slick.
    10 Jan, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (895) | Send Message
     
    Nice find. toward the end he mentions they just shipped the 600 batteries to a Bi Solar in New Jersey. Ok, what can we find out about these guys. This appears to be the sale where the press release went out in Q4 with installation complete in Q4.

     

    -We know who bought the batteries and for what market.
    Still nothing for offshore.
    - I had figured the batteries would have had to have already gone out earlier to be installed in Q4. Guess its drop and go.

     

    What I didn't like was the omission of anything automotive.
    10 Jan, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • User462699
    , contributor
    Comments (102) | Send Message
     
    Bysolar here:
    http://www.bysolar.com
    10 Jan, 12:23 PM Reply Like
  • User462699
    , contributor
    Comments (102) | Send Message
     
    BTW, I believe Rudy Barrio deserves credit for providing that link via twitter if I tracked this down correctly.
    10 Jan, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • AWOL ENGINEER
    , contributor
    Comments (33) | Send Message
     
    Maybe I missed this before but he mentioned working with NS on an OTR train on the Crescent line. Does anyone know if this is just design engineering or is there a possibility of more sales for testing?

     

    I am going to assume he skipped automotive since we won't be seeing it anytime soon.
    10 Jan, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17449) | Send Message
     
    MrHolty: And I liked that he said they would be playing in the FR and backup market as well. I assume this is PJM and Viridity territory and Bi Solar was able to see a good case since data was available from Viridity and.or PJM as well as Axion.

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jan, 01:10 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    Good presentation by TG though dull. Not going to get any random viewer excited about PbCs, but that's ok. Vani present may have been a plus.

     

    Nobody will hit every nail in a 5 minute interview, but yes auto s/s was left out, Cubes for other than solar/wind, and a uniquely huge benefit of PbCs over LAB was not mentioned: that you can deeply discharge it without harm, over and over.
    10 Jan, 01:12 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (352) | Send Message
     
    Axion is "preparing for a very steep climb in top line sales", according to Granville.

     

    Sounds encouraging.
    10 Jan, 01:14 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Well that's a reasonably sized install.

     

    http://bit.ly/1irs5sf

     

    And more installs and photos.

     

    http://bit.ly/1irs5sl
    10 Jan, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1494) | Send Message
     
    Renzo,

     

    I ONLY believe what I see with my eyes, although I must say I am more willing to believe him now after having watched the recent interview...
    10 Jan, 01:40 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (886) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Holty, you just have to know how to translate axion time scale to real-world time scale. When Axion says something will go out in 3 weeks, it usually means 3 months. "Before next CC" means three CC's from now; "not six months" means about a year, and so on.
    10 Jan, 02:22 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (886) | Send Message
     
    They've been preparing for a couple of years now. One day it will start to happen. One day.
    10 Jan, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • rastros
    , contributor
    Comments (36) | Send Message
     
    Our Regions Business is aired on Pittsburgh's KDKA, which is the areas most watched TV station (CBS). The reporter, Bill Flanagan, is a well respected and long-time business correspondent for the station.
    10 Jan, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (856) | Send Message
     
    "Axion is "preparing for a very steep climb in top line sales", according to Granville. --- Sounds encouraging."

     

    As I interpret it, the preparing for the "very steep climb" is happening in 2014. Can it be reasonably inferred that TG is also saying this translates into a "very steep climb" in sales in 2014? --- RBrun357, you've tried to parse TG's words in the past; any thoughts on his latest?

     

    I have to say, that even though TG can come across as rather dull, he did seem to have a "spring in his voice" when commenting on 2014 developments. I noticed he said (at the 5:18 mark) with conviction "it absolutely is..." TWICE, and finished with a downright "glint" in his eyes, face and voice. --- I "absolutely" believe TG believes 2014 will be a very good year.
    10 Jan, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    TG comes across as somewhat the weary warrior, one who's got a lot of miles under his moccasins, but a warrior still, with his destination nearing at last..

     

    Knowing what we know, what also comes through is sheer tenacity.

     

    It would be *very* great to see a companion piece come out as well---something similar but focused on automotive, and starring Vani.
    10 Jan, 03:03 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2673) | Send Message
     
    Sometimes, it is very rewarding to glory with the preparer over the good dinner just eaten, and not even think nor mention the desire for the next meal.

     

    Such verbalization can ruin a good thing.

     

    Of course, it always pays to be aware, even silently.
    10 Jan, 03:28 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (781) | Send Message
     
    WIO,

     

    I must say that I am a believer in TG's confidence regarding his "preparing for a steep climb" after watching the video. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview and although TG is not very charismatic I really do not care about that.

     

    I am still anxious as we all are in regards to "when" the start of significant orders will flow but I am feeling better about Axion after watching the interview!
    10 Jan, 03:51 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    I think that possibly time constraints would prevent him from mentioning all of our potential customers, although it would have been nice. Great to know who the customer is. Another thought I have had is, in November during the CC, TG was asked about other sales developments and he stated that it wouldn't be 6 months. It has only been 2 months since that statement, so I think he deserves a little slack for that. I thought it interesting that he talked about NSC as if it were a done deal! He mentions the (999) and then talks about the Crescent line. He may be speaking about things he KNOWS that we don't! I am still of the opinion that other sales proposals are in the funnel and closer to the end than the beginning of the process.
    10 Jan, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    KDKA, is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, radio stations in America. I believe it is the only station east of the Mississippi with a call sign beginning with a "K", instead of a "W". Not surprising that it is the CBS affilliate, since most heritage radio stations became the heritage television station in the market before the FCC limited ownership to two of three mediums (radio, television, newspaper). I'm sure this got a lot of coverage in the area.
    10 Jan, 05:02 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    Raleigh, TG missed his last "proct-nostication" by a long shot. His past performance puts him in the "We hope to..." category in knowing if/when events will occur. The odds makers in Vegas have placed his date picking capabilities in the same odds category as the Red Bull sky diving guy bouncing and walking away if his parachute didn't open.

     

    I now place his shared information on these event possibilities as things they are working on.
    10 Jan, 05:28 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    AWOL ENG,

     

    PSU, Norfolk Southern receive federal grant

     

    http://bit.ly/S6EdoV
    -
    Alternative power projects

     

    NS 999 leads the charge

     

    "In addition to NS 999, we are continuing work on a prototype battery-powered road locomotive that would move freight over long distances."

     

    http://bit.ly/153097V
    10 Jan, 05:45 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    raleigh, I continue to believe that NS will eventually place large PbC orders, based on their favorable test results vs a lot of the competing battery types, their continued favorable public mentions of Axion, the mention here (although unverified) that they are preparing training for elec locos, and their recent response that work on the NS999 continues.

     

    I just don't know when investors will be given a clear path as to when and how much.
    10 Jan, 05:46 PM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (235) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I,

     

    I have the same opinion, which is one of the big reasons I find myself optimistic at times. I continue to expect the unexpected out of NS this quarter - no foundation for that statement though.

     

    For better or worse, I'm in.
    10 Jan, 06:01 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    I like this quote from NS:

     

    “We’re really excited about it,” said Gibson Barbee, our senior engineer of energy, who has been involved with NS 999 from the start. “It’s all about perseverance, to continue working and moving forward.”

     

    That last sentence sounds exactly like a perfect description of just who they are. Perseverance. It says something both 1) that they *have* persevered with it, and 2) that they *had* to. Which calls to mind my favorite Alex P. Keaton quote: "if it was so easy, everybody'd be doing it"
    10 Jan, 06:11 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29666) | Send Message
     
    Over the years I've come to believe the majority of "business failures" are attributable to a lack of perseverance and an unwillingness to suffer during the hard times. Sometimes entrepreneurs make really stupid choices, but they usually simply give up because it's too hard or they can make more money doing something else.
    10 Jan, 06:21 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    48, The net says it was Tom Hanks.

     

    http://bit.ly/KKDveU

     

    BTW, I think it's great when companies have a vision and will stick with it and support it until they have succeeded or verified it's just not viable with current technology or due to some unforeseen factors. The key is to know when to say when though if you just can't get there. Or if someone else gets there first.
    10 Jan, 06:35 PM Reply Like
  • Alphameister
    , contributor
    Comments (1428) | Send Message
     
    The difference between you and TG is that you are aware that you have no foundation for your optimistic statement.
    10 Jan, 06:51 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    Hanks does a creditable version but it still pales..

     

    The scene: Alex's sister Mallory has been going steady with a guy, something of a lovable loser, named Nick... Nick lacks a few things, one being burning ambition, and two being sophistication...and Mallory begins to notice this. So Nick turns to Alex for help....he decides he needs to be more like Alex.. And Alex takes up the challenge. Nick has come to the right place, Alex is going to teach him everything he knows... how to dress, talk, about the one true politics, and of course, mostly about business, the stock market, and reading the wall street journal... well.. Nick tries to get into it... Sincerity is his one big virtue... And Alex, unjustly without a protoge' for too long, pulls out all the stops in trying to learn Nick some correct economics. But Nick, bless his heart, is having trouble getting it. It seems he under-appreciated the wonder that is Alex all this time... and remarks: "Gee, Alex, I never realized being like you would be so hard" To which of course, Alex replies, "well duh, I mean heck, if it was so easy, then obviously everybody'd be doing it"

     

    Or something like that. Anyway, that is the true genesis. Just one of the gleaming gems that still shines out dimly at us from the glorious, glorious epoch that was our eighties. Our lost eighties. But I digress. And I need a drink.
    10 Jan, 07:01 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    To me, one thing is pretty apparent in TG, at least thus far---there doesn't seem to be much quit in him. I just get the sense that after all this time, his mind is set so that he's going to be the one to either finally sail this voyage into harbor, at last triumphant, or else he's going down with the ship.
    10 Jan, 07:15 PM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (235) | Send Message
     
    alpha,

     

    lol, a subtle difference. That and I'm not the CEO, so it's not expected of me. I may even get a free pass from the board(s) if I'm wrong!
    10 Jan, 07:47 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2535) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I, NS is lending Axion way more in public support that non-existent for 4 years BMW.
    10 Jan, 11:33 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    I like the use of the word "affordable".
    11 Jan, 12:49 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    "For better or worse, I'm in."

     

    Unbridled optimism. Settle down or they'll start accusing us of running a pumper site.
    11 Jan, 12:50 AM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2673) | Send Message
     
    raleigh - FWIW:

     

    KDKA was started by Westinghouse.

     

    Westinghouse bought CBS.

     

    KDKA may have already been a CBS affiaiate prior to becoming part of Westinghouse.

     

    And the rest of the story is, Westinghouse became CBS and moved HQ from PGh to NY.

     

    The Westinghouse fragments are all over the place, owned by others.

     

    Westinghouse stock is no longer an entity.
    11 Jan, 01:47 AM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (220) | Send Message
     
    The only other "K" station in the East: KYW in Philadelphia (1060 AM).
    11 Jan, 02:20 AM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (283) | Send Message
     
    naked, rugged.

     

    Good info. One of my favorite things to do, when travelling late at night, was to try and tune in the farthest away signal I could get. A lot of those 50,000 watt clear channels I could included WLS, WOWO, WLW, WWL. i don't remember the call letters now, but I remember getting a station our of Minneapolis late one night, and I'm sure KDKA. Also, WSM out of Nashville. As a kid, I listened to WOWO Ft Wayne and WLS in Chicago on my transistor radio at night in bed. Of course, I spent my career in broadcast, and was lucky enough to have a career that I loved doing. Radio today is a sad state of affairs with the corporate ownership. It's cookie cutter and has no soul.
    11 Jan, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • Fleet242
    , contributor
    Comments (27) | Send Message
     
    May I ask the context or source of that Barbee quote? I find NS to be the hardest target of internet searching, but when they 'show a little leg' it is usually very tantalizing.

     

    BTW - Good Alex Keaton knowledge

     

    Fleet
    11 Jan, 09:16 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3337) | Send Message
     
    Fleet, the quote came from their page which iindelco first linked above:

     

    http://bit.ly/153097V

     

    subject quote is midway down the page.

     

    APK---if only we had listened... ;)
    11 Jan, 09:58 AM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (220) | Send Message
     
    Raleigh, "career in broadcast"

     

    In what capacities? On air (doing what)? What market(s)?

     

    Ah, those first transistor radios… I was the same, listening to those exotic farthest distant stations under covers at night (in South Jersey near Philadelphia). Add WOR in New York, WKBW in Buffalo "Your Future is Here on the Niagara Frontier" (if it had really been true they wouldn't have needed to keep asserting it so often!), WBZ in Boston. On College Hill in Providence, RI, in the late 60's my big achievement was those times when I could receive a Natchez, Mississippi, FM station on my Lafayette (Radio Shack) LR1500T receiver.
    11 Jan, 12:05 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (856) | Send Message
     
    Raleigh, as a kid growing up in rural Wisconsin, I used to love listening to WLS Chicago, and KOMA Oklahoma City. Besides enjoying the music, it also felt like a way to better connect with the outside world. Not to say I didn't absolutely love the tranquility of living in a land of bountiful cows and deer.
    11 Jan, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2673) | Send Message
     
    raleigh - go Sirius Radio (SIRI) and create you own productions with others content for free (well $13/mo), at your will, anywhere to everywhere without losing the signal you like; boost my investment some more, starting just about where Axpw is today over the past 5-6 years (a 25x bagger). Rightly or wrongly, I just converted some SIRI to AXPW for hopefully another like kind or ride - maybe even more so if AXPW can keep itself pure!!!!!

     

    PS - for what it's worth, the Oldies music is about the best thing on radio.

     

    For FREE streaming material from the internet with real content, it's http://bit.ly/1cWF27N .
    11 Jan, 01:51 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    Check out his pic on LinkedIn

     

    Gibson Barbee
    Senior Energy Engineer at Norfolk Southern Railway Company

     

    http://linkd.in/J6rUpI

     

    Might he have chosen a different one if the project was floundering?
    11 Jan, 03:36 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8969) | Send Message
     
    WTB, I've been watching for exactly that reason for a couple years now. Same picture. Dats good.
    11 Jan, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1497) | Send Message
     
    The obvious alternative explanation is that he is an instrument of the devil and the 666 being upside down is his way of being tongue-in-cheek incognito.
    11 Jan, 04:33 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (721) | Send Message
     
    I used to listen to WLS in TN back @1980 late at night. I remember that's where I first heard John Lennon had been killed
    11 Jan, 04:39 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    I wasn't allowed TV as a youngster. I used to listen to Baretta and a few other night shows on TV channels 6 and 7 by tuning my transistor radio (which I got from the Newark Star Ledger by adding subscribers to my newpaper route) to the extreme top or bottom of the dial.
    11 Jan, 09:30 PM Reply Like