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  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (853) | Send Message
     
    Holy Cow ! It must be a sign.
    12 Jan 2014, 09:17 AM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (853) | Send Message
     
    Of course it's a sign, you nitwit !

     

    Now aren't you glad you kept those shares ?
    12 Jan 2014, 09:19 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (974) | Send Message
     
    There is some horn tooting going on. It may be a truck or it may be a train but some horn blowing is starting.
    12 Jan 2014, 04:40 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    While I'm working on the truck I'm cheering for the train because it has a louder horn and more of them.
    12 Jan 2014, 04:43 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3951) | Send Message
     
    and ta hell with the State that makes minions of us all.
    12 Jan 2014, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2851) | Send Message
     
    John - is this old info?:

     

    http://bit.ly/1cZemU0

     

    http://bit.ly/1cZemU1
    12 Jan 2014, 06:43 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    That story has been out for a while and while the fuel efficiency is impressive, much of the gains is attributable to great aerodynamics, low rolling resistance tires and a host of other enhancements that can be implemented alongside the ePower drivetrain. With all those goodies in place, a 65,000 pound CGWR truck got 9.9 mpg. With none of the goodies and a seriously underpowered engine ePower got 7.2 mpg.

     

    This recent study from the Carbon War Room provides a solid overview of impact on non-drivetrain fuel efficiency opportunities in heavy trucking.

     

    http://bit.ly/1aBO9Qg
    12 Jan 2014, 07:18 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2851) | Send Message
     
    Thanks John - yes, combine the two and NOX some gas from the tails trucking, then locos, and then commuter hybrids of sorts, and we begin to impact drilling. Big opportunity for the private sector.
    12 Jan 2014, 10:46 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2851) | Send Message
     
    Plus, FWIW, this is even a bigger eye opener to the opportunity that is hopefully facing the private sector and real innovation addressing energy and "productivity":

     

    http://bit.ly/1eA9SG2

     

    And it that was not enough of an eye opener, try this one:

     

    http://bit.ly/1eA9SG2

     

    Let's make and sell this stuff, guys; maybe even giving it away for a while is still cheap, or teach others how to implement and use this stuff we're creating,.......

     

    It may still mean more drill, drill, drill; but a lot less drilling with it.
    13 Jan 2014, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2851) | Send Message
     
    This one (embedded in the previous video at its end):

     

    http://bit.ly/1eA9SG2
    13 Jan 2014, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (974) | Send Message
     
    Is the ePower truck now officially "On The Road"?

     

    I remember some heated words not long ago about when this (would) occur|ed. Can we definitively say it is _now_?
    14 Jan 2014, 10:45 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The retrofit of the Gen3 sleeper cab is complete but the tractor won't be "on the road" until we finish our detail work with the insurance carrier. Since insurance companies in the upper midwest are buried in claims associated with the recent cold snap, trying to get and hold their attention is a job. We haven't run into any problems (knock on wood) but the job isn't done till the paperwork is finished.
    14 Jan 2014, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Hungry due to lack of a can opener. The old adage "Hurry up and wait" rings true once again.

     

    I can see it now. Guys driving by the ePower plant, "Hey Sam, Look at those guys at ePower. Been driving around in circles in the parking lot for a week!"

     

    Isn't that they way it seems sometimes with development programs. ;-)
    14 Jan 2014, 11:37 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    If you want proof that God has a sense of humor make a plan.
    14 Jan 2014, 11:43 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    John, Ahhh, Very good.
    14 Jan 2014, 11:57 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    But if you *really* wanna tempt him, don't... ;)
    14 Jan 2014, 02:13 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    01/10/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 194, MinTrSz: 8, MaxTrSz: 100699, Vol: 1967208, AvTrSz: 10140
    Min. Pr: 0.1006, Max Pr: 0.1118, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1052
    # Buys, Shares: 104 1137956, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1060
    # Sells, Shares: 84 761352, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1041
    # Unkn, Shares: 6 67900, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.1054
    Buy:Sell 1.49:1 (57.85% "buys"), DlyShts 532152 (27.05%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 69.90%

     

    Another strange day. First, ARCA was in on the bid side, very unusual, at 09:32 with the highest bid of $0.108. The next best bids were $0.105 from ATDF and $0.1003 by 60K from NITE. This elevated the early trading range substantially from yesterday's VWAP of $0.1024 ($0.1000-$0.1055 range). A feeding frenzy by the buyers ensued (not often seen here), seen in the breakdown by time and price ranges, until ARCA was gone by 09:56, although they were likely gone earlier based on volume and VWAP by 09:38. I couldn't catch all the changes in the bids during the early part of the trading day.

     

    That first rush resulted in almost 17% of the days volume going off at a VWAP of $0.1079 and a very nice buy percentage! This was helped by some larger blocs, ~66K, ~33K, ~22K and several larger than 10K. In the next period we again had some larger blocks of ~60K , ~21K and several of 10K.

     

    In the next period we again ...

     

    By 11:30, the euphoria had passed and we began the descent into the (now semi-normal?) late-day weakness.

     

    28 of the 194 trades were 15K or larger, including 10 in the 20K+ range, 3 in the 30K+ range, 5 of 50K, 4 60K+, a 70.3K and a 100.7K. These represented 51.91% of the day's volume. The buys in this group were 33.98% of day's volume and the sells were 16.27% of day's volume. Excluding these 28 trades, the day's percentages ...

     

    The average of the lowest 20 VWAPs times 80% today is $0.0831 vs. $0.0834, $0.0838, $0.0846 and $0.0849 on prior days. 80% of today's VWAP is $0.0842 vs. $0.0819, $0.0808, $0.0809 and $0.0831 on prior days. These are potential prices for the next tranche of shares to the PIPErs.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved 0.60%, 5.97%, 2.77%, 110.54% and 228.49% respectively. Price spread today was 11.13% vs. 1.90%, 5.80% and 8.08% prior days.

     

    On the traditional TA stuff, I mentioned yesterday ... short-term descending resistance ... Well ...

     

    Although we a higher open, high, low and traded most of the day above it, ~$0.1033 AFAICT, we closed below it at $0.1026. If the market had closed seven minutes sooner we would've closed above the line at $0.1040. Until we see a trend of more-or-less continuous strengthening in price and volume, we have to look at yesterday's early price strength as an aberration and we would have a better chance of being correct if we assumed a return to what has heretofore been more normal.

     

    Additional details and comments are in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    12 Jan 2014, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • obieephyhm
    , contributor
    Comments (1591) | Send Message
     
    wow - a showing . . .
    12 Jan 2014, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • obieephyhm
    , contributor
    Comments (1591) | Send Message
     
    oh, and just to start this concentrator off on a sour note, just remember this is a mid-term election year (like they're gonna let you forget) . . . which is almost always related to a 'bad-moon rising' . . .
    12 Jan 2014, 01:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Power facility in Humboldt operating at half its capacity

     

    "In a segment broadcast on the CBS News program "60 Minutes" on Sunday, correspondent Lesley Stahl mentioned Beacon Power when listing green energy companies that have gone bankrupt after getting federal money.

     

    Beacon Power Corp. filed for bankruptcy in October 2011, but re-formed as Beacon Power LLC when purchased by Rockland Capital of Houston.

     

    The reorganized company completed a 20 megawatt flywheel plant in Stephentown, N.Y., undertook construction at Humboldt and began repaying a loan to the U.S. Department of Energy, Hunt said. He figured 50 or more people have jobs building the plant, including workers at Hayden Electric, one of the contractors. When the plant is built, one or two workers based out of the area will maintain it.

     

    "In truth, Beacon Power is not a fair example of DOE stimulus funds gone to waste as the story attempted to get across," he said in an email. "One could argue that it's an example of stimulus funding that did just what it was supposed to." "

     

    http://bit.ly/KXZ3Fy
    12 Jan 2014, 01:35 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, just ask all the faithful small investors who got burned in the light of that glorious beaconfire...
    12 Jan 2014, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    48, Yeah but I bet some people that were important made out. Ta he$$ with the minions.
    12 Jan 2014, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (483) | Send Message
     
    Lately, 60 Minutes reporting has been down right wrong or misleading. They reluctantly failed to report that the "Green Energy" investment by the Government has a better success rate that the private sector..
    http://bit.ly/1dImnh6

     

    "Neusner and Varney also criticized the federal government's investment in green energy. Neusner said that Obama has a "modest portfolio of low-interest unsecuritized loans to speculative solar-energy plants, wind farms and biofuel plants." But 87 percent of the Department of Energy's 1705 loan guarantee program for green energy is made up of low-risk investments, and these loans have succeeded in creating jobs. Furthermore, the investments in green energy the government made as part of the stimulus have been more frequently successful than green energy investments made by the private market.
    12 Jan 2014, 06:10 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Probably put a bounce in someones step.

     

    Johnson Controls Inc : Johnson Controls Receives Three Awards From Volvo Cars

     

    " Volvo Cars Award of Excellence 2013 for outstanding achievements in environmental and social responsibility"

     

    http://bit.ly/1eAdNCX
    13 Jan 2014, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1110) | Send Message
     
    OT - Has anybody found a simple solution to the nasty new Chrome scrollbar that is maddeningly thin, hard to see, and ridiculously un-userfriendly? --- Thanks.
    13 Jan 2014, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3951) | Send Message
     
    Plan B: Whatever problems existed with Microsoft IE are gone (including a certain slow-running script which made refreshing the Concentrator a problem).
    13 Jan 2014, 01:49 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1110) | Send Message
     
    I was able to download a new scrollbar from this site http://bit.ly/19qhsFJ. Not as good as the original, but much better than the current one.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:31 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Wayne, great tip! So far, working for me like a champ. Chrome32 on Win8.1....
    13 Jan 2014, 05:39 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Our FOIA gnomes have been hard at work and one just sent me this package of documents from the Federal Railroad Administration on the work Norfolk Southern has been doing with Axion since 2010.

     

    http://bit.ly/1aX1MoA

     

    I haven't digested everything yet but it's a fascinating read that offers a great overview of the complexity and cost of the project.
    13 Jan 2014, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >JP ... Thank-you and the gnomes.
    13 Jan 2014, 12:23 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Since it might be considered improper for me to engage in gnomish behavior, I'm merely providing a convenient repository for documents that come flying in over the transom.
    13 Jan 2014, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    John: already on page 4 of the Background, we learn that some work was done in Roanoke on the rectifier.

     

    So we have confirmation it wasn't all in PA.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Jan 2014, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Boy I sure wish we could get a look at the PbC vs Ultrabattery test data.they reference on PDF file pg 43.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Yep, Iindelco. But we have Dr. Bueil(sp?) already telling us it doesn't work [as well in our applications?].

     

    HardToLove
    13 Jan 2014, 04:12 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    HTL, Understood. But there is nothing like A vs B comparison data to drive home a point. I'd just love to see things like DCA over a test life, internal resistance at different SOC, string balance, etc.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    Has the good DR. B moved on to other arenas?
    13 Jan 2014, 04:45 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Coulometrics llc.

     

    http://linkd.in/1gBRHBt
    13 Jan 2014, 05:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    AiB: IIRC, he had sold his shares some time back, apparently as he didn't believe management was marketing(?) it aggressively enough.

     

    And something got under his skin and he stopped visiting.

     

    From (fualty?) memory,
    HardToLove
    13 Jan 2014, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    IINDelco,
    Speaking of Ultrabattery, OMY was over on Yadoodle this past week trying to promote the idea that, since the Ultra-battery has an energy and DCA drop in cold weather, when used as an energy battery for an HEV, that this must also be true for the PbC in start-stop applications and for ePower. I don't buy the argument, especially since Axion has stated on numerous occasions that cold does not effect the PbC, but the link to the Ultra-battery report was interesting. I don't think it's been posted here in the past, so I'll post it below. I haven't had time to read it all yet (my children think their dad should pay attention to them over the weekend), but maybe others would find it interesting (and are faster readers.)

     

    http://1.usa.gov/1gC5A2H
    13 Jan 2014, 06:26 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    might just be me, but I canna get the link to work captain...
    13 Jan 2014, 06:34 PM Reply Like
  • User462699
    , contributor
    Comments (120) | Send Message
     
    48, it's a .pdf that downloads to your computer for viewing.
    13 Jan 2014, 06:42 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    thanks 46, just wouldn't do squat for me in chrome, repeatedly, but downloading okay (so far) right now in firefox...
    13 Jan 2014, 06:52 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    48,
    That's strange. It downloaded fine for me in Chrome? Very strange. Anyway, glad you got it to work.
    13 Jan 2014, 07:53 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    One thing I found interesting about the document was that it pointed out how terrible the Ultra-battery is as an energy battery in even mildly cool weather (ie. 50F or cooler). It also points out the fact that all these reports we hear about the Ultra-battery doing X number of miles in an HEV are all done in places like Arizona, where they don't have to worry about cold weather. I found that very telling.
    13 Jan 2014, 08:27 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    I know collectively we've gone over ad infinitum why the PbC was not included in this (fairly in-depth and reasonably rigorous) study, and there certainly are the valid reasons, but still, it sure would have been nice to see a full-on apples-to-apples comparison of the PbC against its mutant UB and carbon-additive cousins... (to say nothing of NiMh).... but of course, all's well that will end well, and when we finally do get that long-looked-for MH/SS design win, the tedious and winding road it took to get there will probably make a lot more sense-- in the rear-view mirror.
    13 Jan 2014, 08:45 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    FWIW, ISTM that UB's cold wx problems had more to do with power acceptance than energy.... but perhaps I need to re-read it.
    13 Jan 2014, 08:48 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    48,
    Yes, I think you are correct. I keep focusing on how few miles the Ultra-battery could go in colder temperatures, but the more I read, the more I understand that this is because the DCA goes down so dramatically that it takes much longer for the battery to be recharged. And so you can only go a few miles on battery again before you need the engine to kick on and charge the battery for a longer period of time. If this is correct, and I see no reason not to believe it to be, then Axion has nothing to worry about as far as whether or not the Ultra-battery could ever be a replacement for ePower. No way they could get by with these DCA issues in the cold.
    13 Jan 2014, 10:07 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    Thanks JP(and FOIAers). Please provide any insights after you digest it =)
    14 Jan 2014, 04:13 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (974) | Send Message
     
    Interesting that the 4th quarter is 31 Dec. May imply that you wouldn't want to claim your project was done before that date. Which could also explain otherwise unexplainable delays.
    14 Jan 2014, 07:42 AM Reply Like
  • bobhaeger
    , contributor
    Comments (39) | Send Message
     
    Couple quotes that caught my eye.

     

    pg42-"If thermal variation identified thus far exceeding 10 °C
    cannot be reduced, viability of road locomotive hybrids using the PbC® technology is questionable."

     

    pg50-"Due to battery management challenges and the complexity of modeling the hybrid system, NS has requested removal of task 7 / G. NS is actively pursuing a hybrid locomotive but the timing of this locomotive has been delayed."

     

    pg61-"Following meetings with the FRA April 2012, NS and the FRA agreed to focus on higher voltage systems between 400 - 800 V DC as necessary for locomotive operations and respectively requested this task be removed from the 20 II scope of work."
    14 Jan 2014, 02:35 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Thx bobh. Not sure what to make of those items. I can't even tell when they were made, exactly. Are the comments still relevant, I wonder? Do they help explain the protracted pre-rollout period we're still in?

     

    Another, probably smaller item I noticed:

     

    "NS placed a purchased order for 727 (of the 864 PbC batteries necessary for the rebuilt NS999) in August 2012 [Axion’s PR of this event was in April, so hopefully this a typo. That PR said, “this first $400,000 purchase order is part of a $475,000 total purchase order, that will be used in the commissioning of Norfolk Southern's NS-999”]. NS battery tray fabricator received these batteries and NS subsequently receipted for them December 20, 2012 [Axion’s 1/1//2013 PR said, “Axion Power shipped the last skids that comprised this battery order to NS in late December and the batteries will be used to power the NS-999 "yard switcher" locomotive.”, and “The final shipment of batteries to Norfolk Southern means that approximately $475,000 in revenue, attributable to the eventual re-commissioning of the NS-999, will be recognized in Axion's results for the fourth quarter of 2012.”]."

     

    There was discussion here and maybe even a Q on an earnings conf call about the $400k vs $475k. IIRC, people were thinking the diff was due to batteries being used by NS on other project(s). Based on what has been disclosed here, I’m guessing not: 400/475 = 727/864.

     

    Also, people were wondering where the batteries were. Looks like they were at the fabricator, at least initially.
    14 Jan 2014, 05:19 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Looks like we could use a copy of the Final Summary Report.
    14 Jan 2014, 05:53 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    BH, regarding the pg42 quote, I'm not (yet) clear as to what they are referring exactly with their qualifier "thus far"... were those the thermal variations they experienced with the previous Enersys batteries as installed in the locomotive, or indeed actually with PbCs in some other testing event? It would seem to me that virtually any battery type could also face the same issues of undue thermal variations, seeing that heat generation is going to be present in any battery type which is handling great amounts of power... Unless you have zero internal resistance then it's the nature of the beast, some worse, some better. Though of course I suppose even with the ideal case of zero resistance there is also going to be some heat liberated (or absorbed) internally by the specific electro-chemical reactions themselves...

     

    Anyone got a better handle on it?
    14 Jan 2014, 10:34 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    IIRC the thermal issues arose in large part because of the pan style battery racking used in the original design and reducing hot spots was a big part of the engineering challenge. I'd also note that the materials on thermal challenges were part of an 8/30/12 filing, so their statements about moving forward with the OTR in the 2013 Sustainability Report suggest that the issue was resolved.
    15 Jan 2014, 06:49 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    And our famous 200 AMP limitation comes not from the PbC, but from the IGBTs used to boost voltage to 800. They are limited to 200 amps.

     

    2011 Final report.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Jan 2014, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (974) | Send Message
     
    Someone is being mislead.
    "Are EV Battery Prices Much Lower Than We Think? Under $200/kWh?
    http://bit.ly/19pRjHd
    13 Jan 2014, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (523) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Updated late-breaking APC comments chart!
    13 Jan 2014, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Better enjoy those non-GAAP numbers while you can.

     

    Will Low Resale Values Spoil The Cost Benefits Of Electric-Car Ownership?

     

    "Tesla Motors is—no surprise—taking a different strategy here, and offering relatively affordable lease prices based on the company's own guarantee that the resale value of its Model S will be the highest of any premium sedan model."

     

    http://bit.ly/1iJ22ge
    13 Jan 2014, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Well, that was interesting, watching about 400k shares trade from ARCA to ARCA. In the end, the ARCA seller's still around and the buyer is gone for now.
    13 Jan 2014, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    14:41-14:56 ARCA on the bid at $0.103 soaks up 446000
    shares AFAICT, all sells.

     

    Now they are on the offer at $0.103.

     

    My suspicion is, since they were not on the offer all the time, is they were unloading shares from one ARCA customer to another in an, effectively, intra-exchange trade.

     

    End points? No way to know.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Jan 2014, 03:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Jeez. Come on people! Just because a 999 locomotive can do it!

     

    Calling 999 Does NOT Boost Your Mobile Phone Battery, Police Warn As Hoax Persists

     

    http://huff.to/L3khSz
    13 Jan 2014, 03:12 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    My second largest holding after $AXPW, $APNT is up 100% in two days on strong volume, but I'm not sure why. Someone must know something...
    13 Jan 2014, 03:16 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    Would love if I could exchange some of that position in the 0.25-0.30 range for more AXPW so I can join the million-share club.

     

    ...but will hold all of my APNT that I own at 0.04-0.05 for 3-5 years on their Solexel royalties alone. Not to mention their emerging sensor platform.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1966) | Send Message
     
    Patrick…remember hubris and nemesis? :-)
    13 Jan 2014, 04:35 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Oh, those guys? they're my buddies. Together we bought some APNT way back when they were working with Canon for the next big thing in direct luminescence HD television. (SED TV) Whee, what a ride with those fellas! good times, good times. Let's just say I was a tad early, again.

     

    edit: just in case she's listening, I didn't mean to offend Nemesis (any further) with my unfortunately erroneous gender descriptor error.. really I didn't.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:44 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (483) | Send Message
     
    I am also very happy today with my holdings in that stock Patrick. My avg cost is now .072

     

    I called them about ten days ago to find out more info on the merger. The CEO, Bakker, returned my calls and assured me there would be NO change in anyone's share count. Maybe that news has been circulated, I don't know. Maybe the merger has been OKed by the SEC. Or maybe they have closed a deal on one of their sensors OR (the big one) the metallic ink. Lets hope this price holds. I have owned them from way back when they were called SI-Diamond.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    FWIW I did quite well when I sold my APNT shares (f/k/a SIDT) in '93 and '94.

     

    You guys remember my comments about serving as issuer's counsel for the world's first carbon nanotechnology IPO? APNT is that company.
    13 Jan 2014, 04:55 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Well, John, clearly you were much earlier than me (circa 2007)... guess I just managed to hit the sweetspot. ...what can I say, I have a gift. ;)
    13 Jan 2014, 04:58 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    Nemesis is like my roommate, but I'm a much bigger fan of the story of Job. Authority be damned. The Man is an uncompassionate hypocrite.
    13 Jan 2014, 08:11 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    FINRA has progressed - gone from missng 1 - 23 shares of trade volume to missing -67.19%, 607,793. At this level their reported short sales of 74,090 is likely low too.

     

    I do expect a lower percentage today, but not as low as this would suggest, 8.19%.

     

    I wish there was something I could do to fix it - it wastes my (ever more precious) time.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Jan 2014, 05:50 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I wonder how many other people track the FINRA data closely enough to point out errors on a regular basis ...
    13 Jan 2014, 06:16 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Uggh! :-(

     

    Newssummary: China's Lead-acid Battery Scrap Recycling Rate Less Than 30%

     

    http://bit.ly/1dqVl2Y
    13 Jan 2014, 06:24 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    Oh yeah. Here is an article that is making the rounds on my facebook feed.

     

    A Poison Aficionado's Guide to 6 Killer Chemicals
    http://bit.ly/1j4lV43

     

    #1 Lead.
    Mother Jones' Kevin Drum has documented just how deleterious this naturally occurring heavy metal is to us. Lead is particularly dangerous to children, because it acts as a neurotoxin that can stunt brain development. And it's all around us: Naturally occurring in the soil, but also in substances ranging from paint in older houses, to pipes, to lipstick (the latter in very small amounts that the FDA says are safe).

     

    "As a poison, there's not one redeeming thing you can say about lead. It's just bad," Blum says. "And I like to remind people, it's still around, we're still exposing ourselves to it, and everyone's at risk." For more comprehensive information about lead risks in your home, see this infographic or click here.

     

    From the same group.
    http://bit.ly/1j4lXsX

     

    We need a new name. Coconut Carbon sounds nice.
    13 Jan 2014, 06:34 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Mr. Holty. Another name indeed.

     

    When I think of all the houses I've scraped before painting and all the fishing equipment I made with molten lead and the tens of millions of parts lubricated w/ lead based grease and...

     

    Hell, No wonder I love PbC technology. One can say I'm "nuts" about it!

     

    CarboCharge. When you need the speed! Find it next to our racing Turbo Charge batteries. When Turbo just isn't fast enough.
    13 Jan 2014, 07:26 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    IINDelco,
    I've got a house that was built in the 40's. I've basically confirmed that there is lead underneath all the paint in the house. I talked to the local EPA people and their basic response was to tell me to leave it where it is and just keep painting over it. Unless it is flaking off the internal walls, they say you are safest if you just keep it covered, since you aren't being exposed to it if it is covered by new layers of paint. I did some refurbishing of the trim work before I knew this, so I went and got myself and my kid's blood checked, just to make sure we didn't have any issues and they said that there was no detectable amounts in our blood, so it takes more to get a real dose exposure than to just scrape some paint or be in a house with it. They did say the one place you want to check is your windows, since opening and closing the windows can cause a constant dusting of the lead to occur, but my windows were replaced before I bought the house, so that wasn't an issue.
    13 Jan 2014, 08:05 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (2853) | Send Message
     
    I've spent gads of time dealing with lead paint. It seems the golden era of lead was around the 1920's. Lead enabled some bright unnatural pastels impossible before then which were quite trendy. Oil based lead paint was more moisture resistant than any prior coatings so kitchens, baths, exteriors and trim are most likely to have layers of lead. The "pre latex" era has super high probabilities of lead in those areas. Latex supplanted a lot of the lead paint to some degree.

     

    Lead paint was AFAIK always oil based, and thus becomes brittle with age and it tends to peel. This friability makes it especially hazardous as disturbing brittle flakes unleashes microscopic lead dust into the air in quantity. You breathe it or it falls to the floor and you track it around.

     

    I've developed a system that I believe is very effective in dealing with the most heinous and disgusting of old chalking, flaking, dusty lead coated walls as follows. You can use a respirator or just a dust mask depending on your tolerance for exposure vs safety.

     

    First lay down some layers of newspapers near the wall, with plastic sheeting underneath duct taped to the baseboard if desired. Then fill a garden type sprayer with hot water mixed with a TSP type cleaning solution found in paint stores. TSP is aggressive at ripping heavy metal dust off of surfaces which is one reason it's used for paint prep. (At paste consistency it can strip some paints.) Automatic dishwasher detergent does a good job too with HOT water.

     

    A 1 to 3 gallon garden sprayer will make quick work of wetting the surfaces. Use a fine mist so that any airborne lead particles get wet and fall to the floor on the newspaper. As the leadened water wets the newspaper just keep adding more newspaper on top. That traps the lead between layers of paper so you don't track it around. Keep a mop handy to sponge up excess water on the floor.

     

    Have a 5 gallon bucket of hot TSP solution handy. Scrub the wet walls with a large stiff cleaning brush after you mist/spray them down. Dunk the brush in the bucket as you go to rinse it. The lead being heavy will fall to the bottom of the bucket.Often the water turns the color of the paint. With a scraper in one hand scrape as needed the wet wall as you go, brushing/scrubbing with the other hand. There will be virtually no airborne dust regardless of how initially dusty/chalky/peeling the surface was initially!

     

    Roll up and dispose of newspapers trapping the paint detritus and put down fresh paper. Spray down walls and scrub/scrape again as many rounds as needed, then finally spray with a rinse of clean water.

     

    Run your palm over the wall everywhere. When your hand looks and feels completely clean after dragging it over the wall, congratulations, you've gone from a terrible mess to completely clean and ready for the next step. It's tremendously satisfying to save an old plaster or brick wall this way, and it's actually pretty fast and painless. This system is many times faster than my first attempts by trial and error!

     

    The only caveat is that for +exterior siding+ when there are many built up paint layers, sometimes the best solution is to just strip down to bare wood. Otherwise the outdoor moisture exposure and big temperature changes can wreak havoc on adhesion between old inner layers, which is beyond your control.

     

    There is a power tool called the "paint shaver" that feeds its exhaust into a HEPA vacuum that I've wanted to try, but never had enough exterior area I had to strip down to wood to justify the expense.
    13 Jan 2014, 09:32 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    RA,
    It's an interesting system, but one that would be discouraged, at least here in NC, on any large area. Here they don't want you throwing any lead paint away in the trash, because it's considered toxic. And if you take it to the landfill, they are going to want to see your permit that you are supposed to have to be licensed to remove lead paint. You can hire a contractor to remove it, but they basically have to turn your house into a hazardous waste site to remove it. For small areas, your system would probably work o.k. Anything larger, and the only thing you can really use on your own around here is an alkaline paste paint remover that is suppose to bind up the lead and make it no longer biologically available. That you are allowed to throw in the trash around here. The process is rather slow, and involves multiple steps where you have to inactive the paste on the wood with acetic acid, once you've removed the lead paint with it, and then rinse the wood with water and let it dry. The process works well on doors and wood work, but I wouldn't want to try it on drywall. One thing I found, is that, if you do have lead paint, make sure you prime your wall with an oil based primer before you put latex paint over it. If you don't the latex paint will cause the oil paint to dry out and everything will come flaking off much faster. This is what has happened in a lot of older houses, where someone didn't take the time to properly prime the walls before they switched from oil paints to latex.
    13 Jan 2014, 09:55 PM Reply Like
  • Treehill
    , contributor
    Comments (148) | Send Message
     
    To me all this obsession with lead seems excessive. For a number of years I was a professional painter, working in a small company specializing in heritage restoration. The guy I worked with who owned the company came from 3 generations of painters. As a kid he grew up mixing paint for his dad and grandfather. Both his dad and grandfather spent years working with lead paints and they lasted well into their retirement years. All that exposure to lead (incurred without masks, gloves or anything remotely resembling today's hazardous material outfits) didn't appear to have any negative health effects.
    13 Jan 2014, 10:37 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (2853) | Send Message
     
    LabTech> The city has gotten more stringent here over the years too. I "cut my teeth" on homeowner style lead abatement before it was to some degree outlawed. I gleaned a lot of tips through reading the old fashioned way pre-internet and invented some of my own.

     

    As for hazardous waste, if the newspapers are sealed in double layers of heavy gauge garbage bags it's hard to imagine a scenario where it becomes a problem. If still worried then triple bag it. I just throw it in the trash double bagged and tied. Would it work for a large scale renovation? No, but few homeowners have to worry about that.

     

    IMO it's too bad that bureaucrats would worry so much about hazardous trash going to the landfill -- the one place hazardous stuff is supposed to be -- that they discourage in effect people and landlords from taking care of problem lead paint in homes -- the place it really IS a hazard. They discourage it by making abatement so expensive or regulated or outlawing people from working on their own homes in some cases. It's way too much if you ask me, but I'm a bit of a rebel that way and I don't tend to pull a permit to run a new circuit or the like.

     

    OTOH a lot of workers really are thoughtless or unskilled in an abatement job and thus expose residents. It's a tough issue but I don't think current laws are very wise about abatement. I like how my city has purchased 3 HEPA vacuums of commercial quality for free loan to homeowners specifically for lead abatement. They give you a little booklet and a free vac and just say have at it with no hands on training. I think it's a good idea. I can only imagine how many people poison their families by sucking up lead chips in a regular vacuum without HEPA.
    13 Jan 2014, 11:04 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1110) | Send Message
     
    Treehill, "To me all this obsession with lead seems excessive."

     

    I think it's important to keep in mind that people have widely varying abilities to detoxify (men detoxify alcohol twice as fast as women). Detoxification often involves complex methylation and transsulferation pathways, which can become dysfunctional and quite inefficient. This can be the result of genetics, various nutritional deficiencies, and other factors. It may be that the family of painters you referenced had good genetics and good nutrition. A lot of other people however can be quite vulnerable to heavy metal toxicity, especially children.
    14 Jan 2014, 02:51 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (483) | Send Message
     
    Wayne, " especially children" is the important line here. The lead is very bad for their nervous system and brain development. Adults, being fully grown have much less to probably no adverse affects from lead. I'm not saying to go out and eat the stuff, but I too feel that some of these groups go way overboard.
    14 Jan 2014, 07:32 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    All, Thanks for the cautionary comments concerning lead paint and the good advice on how to handle small house renovations with a degree of care. I was more enlightened in my older years concerning lead paint so I didn't expose my family to the same level of self inflicted exposure I endured during my many dealings with the material.

     

    None have bought Axion stock so while there is always a level of concern at least one minor piece of feedback indicates I did OK. <end snark>
    14 Jan 2014, 07:39 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    I have one of the "paint shaver" tools I am using to remove lead paint in my 1918 house. It works pretty well. The heat makes the paint soft and bubbles up so you can scrape it off without raising a lot of dust. It gets hot enough to set your house on fire, so you have to watch where you set it down. A heat gun might work just as well, but slower going.
    http://bit.ly/1lZM8ke

     

    Also, be sure to wear an OSHA approved respirator; dust masks are useless.

     

    If you don't want to go to all that trouble, you can just paint over it using a paint called Ecobond that is made to stabilize leat paint. Two coats of that, then your top coat of regular paint and it will stay put.
    http://bit.ly/1lZMabM
    14 Jan 2014, 09:15 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Our previous house was built in the 1880's. Was gut rehabbed before we moved in, but still, issues were popping up all the time.

     

    There's nothing like the new house we're in now. No issues, everything works and is modern. Super highly recommend it.
    14 Jan 2014, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (2853) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I> Amen to "issues popping up all the time" as is the case with my 1893 bungalow. People who have only lived in well maintained or more modern homes have no grasp of the constant stream of problems a neglected old building can generate, even long after the neglect has ceased. I would have to say that built up layers of poor paint jobs can be the worst time consumers.
    14 Jan 2014, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    RA, I actually liked some of the stuff I had to do, as it was nice to use my hands after working all day with my head. But in the end, enough was enough. Starting new has been very refreshing.

     

    Of course there's still the grass to mow and the driveway to shovel, but that's where I can still get my hands dirty so I like it.
    14 Jan 2014, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4809) | Send Message
     
    "Treehill, 'To me all this obsession with lead seems excessive.'

     

    I think it's important to keep in mind that people have widely varying abilities to detoxify (men detoxify alcohol twice as fast as women)."

     

    People also have widely varying tolerances for many natural substances, e.g. - peanuts. Some people eat peanuts in some form throughout most of their lives with no ill effect while some experience severe allergic reaction to even tiny trace amounts of peanuts or peanut oil. Why make it difficult/more expensive for property owners to improve or modify structures previously painted with lead-based paint(s) and not take comparable action(s) to make it difficult/more expensive to consume peanuts?
    15 Jan 2014, 05:23 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (2853) | Send Message
     
    ngs> I'm referring to a different tool actually dubbed "The Paint Shaver". see here http://bit.ly/1asZvBA Isn't that thing awesome? probably not advisable for interior use though, esp on lead

     

    As for a special coating to bind down lead paint, it might work better than other paint but I'm comfortable with painting over lead with any paint. It's good prep that's most important and the best paint won't make up for poor prep. Also I'm sure that Ecobond cannot do any magic if any of the built up inner layers are poorly bonded to each other. They'll be prone to peeling sooner or later no matter what.
    16 Jan 2014, 05:04 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3951) | Send Message
     
    With a properly wielded propane torch and scraper, it is quite easy to quickly remove multiple layer of unwanted paint from exterior windows, trims, etc. Turns to goo.

     

    How quick or how safe? All relative. Some freak out about the flame, others about the lead, others about the labor.

     

    Fact is we all are getting all too used to being told "OMG, IT'S A NIGHTMARE", you better call your local State employees to have more laws written, more regs enforced, more licenses issued, more government to keep one safe. If you have a job, Uncle Sam wants YOU.

     

    Just keep your kids away.

     

    The rest of the hysteria is just government pump-n-tax propaganda.
    16 Jan 2014, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    In 1984 I melted down some lead fishing weights in our woodstove in order to custom form-fit a nose weight into the cowling area of a royal-models 1/2A RC Spitfire I was building (into which I shoehorned a lovely O.S. Max 0.10 FSR) .... Who knows what sort of ruin those fumes begat...

     

    Between that and all my mercury fillings, to this day I wonder if that might have been it...
    13 Jan 2014, 07:34 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (724) | Send Message
     
    I recall that in "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" RK's first attempt to make money was to melt down tooth paste tubs (made of lead) to make nickels...he seems to be doing OK. My dad talked about melting down lead pipes before taking them to the recycler because they would get more per pound that way.
    At the risk of waking up some Axion holders to sell, I have read that EDTA and IP6 found in any health food store and cilantro is an effective way to help detoxify of heavy metal.
    No if the EPA could only do the same about the more prevalent FDA approved, neurotoxin, food additive of MSG.
    16 Jan 2014, 04:15 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4809) | Send Message
     
    "I have read that EDTA and IP6 found in any health food store and cilantro is an effective way to help detoxify of heavy metal. "

     

    Could be, but one might want to research IP6 (at least) side effects a bit before ingesting regular dosages for very long. I've read that it can be a contributing factor to, or promote, colon polyps.

     

    Took IP6 for a while 10+ yrs ago as part of a nutritional therapy undertaken on my initiative (and research) in addition to "watchful waiting" recommendation by physicians (FACPs) on diagnosis of stage IV small cell lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). Physicians waited and watched while I did not. (No longer have enlarged lymph nodes or abnormal blood cell counts.)

     

    Informing of an SLL diagnosis was the second time a physician had pronounced me "dead man walking." The first occurrence was in 1962 and due to misidentification/repo... of laboratory results. Between those two episodes a decade+ long experience with orthopedic specialists regarding immobilizing back pain, sharp pain in heels on walking and sporadic, unpredictable up close inspection of walking surfaces gave further reason to regard conventional medicine with circumspection as well as reason to strongly consider WiO referral to
    http://bit.ly/1apJigv. In my case a competent Chiropractor resolved "herniated" and "slipped" disk diagnoses, obviating orthopedic specialist recommendations for spinal fusion procedures.

     

    Supporters of "a single payer" system or "Obamacare" might want to consider that caveat emptor applies.
    16 Jan 2014, 07:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Johnson Controls sells automotive electronics business

     

    "This completes Johnson Controls’ divestiture of its automotive electronics business. It sold the HomeLink product line to Gentex Corp. in September. Total proceeds of the transactions are more than $965 million."

     

    The sales will allow the company to focus on its core businesses in buildings, automotive and energy storage and reallocate capital to diversifying its portfolio and driving shareholder value."

     

    http://bit.ly/1iNpUiV
    14 Jan 2014, 08:02 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Since FINRA daily short sales will be delayed at least to 09:30, and more likely still missing 67% of the trade volume, I thought I'd post the top of what may eventually become part of the blog for 1/13, because I became enamored of the phrase I coined.

     

    I don't know when I'll get the blog updated as we'll be in the trading day by the time I can peek at the updated FINRA data, which I suspect will still be erroneous.

     

    01/13/2014: EOD stuff partially copied blog (up ??).
    # Trds: 112, MinTrSz: 150, MaxTrSz: 95000, Vol: 904633, AvTrSz: 8077
    Min. Pr: 0.1005, Max Pr: 0.1070, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1034
    # Buys, Shares: 25 176793, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1045
    # Sells, Shares: 79 669840, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1032
    # Unkn, Shares: 8 58000, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.1015
    Buy:Sell 1:3.79 (19.54% "buys"), DlyShts xxxxxx (xx.xx%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' xx.xx%

     

    The “Sold Rush of '14” began when ARCA exited the sell side, by withdrawing their $0.103 offer at 14:13, they posted a bid of $0.103 at 14:40, and 446K shares proceeded to continuously hit the bid of $0.103 from 14:41 through 14:56. This was 49.30% of the days volume in 16 minutes. Mores shares in 16 minutes than many days' total volume.

     

    The burning question, of course, was who was selling and who was buying, and why did this action seem so coordinated? ARCA present on the offer helping to keep prices low, they disappear from there and appear on the bid with best offer again (remember the $0.108 bid they had on the open 1/10?), and then the rush begins.

     

    Is this manipulated market or what? Aren't you proud of our financial markets and their regulators?

     

    Anyway, ARCA then exited the buy side and came back on the sell side with a $0.103 offer at 14:58. They became aggressive on the ask, contesting with NITE for the top spot, and had the offer down to $0.101 by 15:18. From there to the close a movement of only 5/100ths of a penny up to $0.1015 was the best offer seen.

     

    In aggregate, an expected return to “normalcy” today? Beyond the above, first, no ARCA on the bid side until 14:58 as described above. They appeared on the offer at 12:29 with the best ask of $0.1031, 1/10th of a penny lower than what had been the best offer. They stayed until 14:13 and were on top most of the time in the $0.103x range. NITE did step in front of them briefly with a $0.103 offer at 14:06 and took the top spot with that same offer when ARCA exited the sell side at 14:13. Nothing much went on for the next twenty-eight minutes until the “Sold Rush of '14” began at 14:41, described above.

     

    I'll post a link if/when I get the blog updated.
    14 Jan 2014, 08:05 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Saft signs multi-million euro energy storage contract for La Réunion island

     

    "Saft is leading a consortium to build a 9 MWp photovoltaic (PV) power plant incorporating a megawatt-scale Li-ion energy storage system to ensure effective grid integration for solar PV power on a French island in the Indian Ocean"

     

    http://bit.ly/1cZOLxD
    14 Jan 2014, 08:05 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    'BIRD Energy' Announces $3.6 Million in Cooperative Clean Energy Projects

     

    "The four approved projects include:

     

    EnStorage (Yavne, Israel) and Princeton Power Systems, Inc. (Lawrenceville, NJ), will develop a next generation energy storage system for uninterrupted supply.

     

    Rafael Advanced Defense Systems (Haifa, Israel) and Aquion Energy, (Pittsburgh, PA), will develop an advanced energy system for remote off-grid systems."

     

    http://bit.ly/1cZPz5J
    14 Jan 2014, 08:10 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Blog updated - FINRA "work-around" does on large discrepancies, apparently.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jan 2014, 12:26 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1702) | Send Message
     
    Remember the SEPTA train regenerative braking project we were excited about a couple of years ago?

     

    Its time for SEPTA to expand on their first success:

     

    “This time, we will go one step further and deploy a hybrid energy storage system, by combining super capacitors with batteries. We will recover more braking energy, produce higher revenues from the frequency regulation, and extend the battery life. This innovation demonstrates the full capability and flexibility of our Enviline platform,” says Jacques Poulin, Enviline product manager, ABB.
    http://bit.ly/1dNtTXW
    14 Jan 2014, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (483) | Send Message
     
    No mention of the type of batteries though. Aren't they right in Axion's back yard?
    14 Jan 2014, 01:53 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Masi: SAFT used Li-ion earlier - I think it's going to be the same.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jan 2014, 01:54 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    I'm sorry, but if Axion cannot sell a storage system for this application right in their own backyard, there has got to be some kind of major flaw with their product or program -- perhaps prohibitive cost? or just an incompetent sales team? -- but this should be a perfect fit for a PbC storage system.
    14 Jan 2014, 02:05 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1702) | Send Message
     
    The batteries might be the same--I agree. But note the addition of "super capacitors" as well.

     

    I wish they would just go with PbC. Would be cheaper, no "thermal" issues, etc.
    14 Jan 2014, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    If Axion thought about it, they would bid just the supercapacitor and never mention the energy sink they are encased in. The reason why Axion probably doesn't have a chance with this local project is because, first, it is a SAFT & ABB project and, second, Axion wasn't a viable product when the initial project was conceived. Now Axion (as well as any other vendor) is just frozen out. Someone else will build something similar and, depending on the GM, Axion might get a shot.
    14 Jan 2014, 02:13 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (2001) | Send Message
     
    NGS,

     

    I am also starting to have major doubts sometimes about our so called "experienced management". There just seems too much going on in energy storage right now and Axion is nowhere to be found. Makes me wanna bust my head against the wall.

     

    Granville if you are reading this, please wake up !!
    14 Jan 2014, 02:38 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    NGS,
    I think the problem in this case, is that Axion doesn't really have a chance to bid on something like this, because SEPTA isn't just buying a battery back-up system but a whole set of systems from ABB. They were the one who got the first contract and they were the one who "won" the second round (ie a winner had been picked before any bids were accepted). If you look at the ABB website you will see that they supply SEPTA with a system to take in the energy, a system to feed excess power to the local grid, and a system to release excess energy that their battery system can't take in (because SAFT's LI-ion batteries don't have a high enough DCA). ABB is the one who chooses which battery/super capacitor they use in their system. SEPTA isn't concerned about that, only that the total system meets their needs. I think this is more likely how you are going to see these kinds of installations proceeding in the future. Companies aren't interested in who's battery is being used, but are interested in purchasing from a company that can put all the parts of a system they need together. Think of Multi-Link. No one who buys a system from them cares if it has a PbC battery in it. They only care that the battery Multi-Link uses meets their needs. That's why I'm going to be interested to see if we get any of these off-shore contracts, because they will probably show all the integrators that Axion is working with to sell a system, not just a PowerCube.
    14 Jan 2014, 03:02 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    LabTech, I think your point is on the money and that's why we saw the public announcement from Axion that they were looking for a systems integrator to work in the CA market. End users don't want and can't handle buying pieces of a system by and large. They need a system integrator for the full system installation and after the sale service / assurances that things will be covered.
    14 Jan 2014, 03:24 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Interestingly, ZBB said that they had to go away from that model b/c it didn't work for them.
    14 Jan 2014, 03:56 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (2001) | Send Message
     
    LabTech,

     

    Waiting to see if we will be chosen for off-shore island projects ???

     

    We better be!! After all the hype coming out from TG regarding this topic, if he can't deliver on it then there is a high chance I will write down my whole perception of him as just a sub average CEO. He can give all the interviews he wants and the predictions he makes, but at the end of the day I will only judge him by the bacon he brings home, and so far there isn't much bacon for us...
    14 Jan 2014, 04:10 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    >>. But note the addition of "super capacitors" as well.<<

     

    Might explain why MXWL is up 5% today.
    14 Jan 2014, 04:11 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    I assume ABB had to choose a vendor for the batteries and supercapacitors. I would assume they want their product to be the best it can be. Surely they know about PbC (if they don't, that's a whole other thing to get mad about), yet they chose to go with a different system. I can only guess that the battery-capacitor combo has some cost or performance advantage for this application.
    14 Jan 2014, 04:16 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Then let's change our name to "Carbon-Capacitor" or "Coco-Capacitor."

     

    IIRC, the/a reason given for the failure of the PbC to get into the Septa project was that took up too much space in a space-constrained location.
    14 Jan 2014, 04:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, It's hard to be in the middle between an integrator and the customer. Especially if your offering doesn't have a drop dead advantage and there are many options/suppliers. I don't see Axion as having any huge advantage in this market. Maybe if they were at scaled pricing?

     

    I have no problem being wrong in my perception.
    14 Jan 2014, 04:51 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Not saying you're wrong ii - just not sure if I can deal with Axion being wrong on this issue also.

     

    Just waiting for the smoke to stop blowing if it ever does.
    14 Jan 2014, 07:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I'm with ya.

     

    BTW, Just saw this article which is timely.

     

    Stored energy: Turn-key energy storage systems

     

    http://bit.ly/1a5kRdI
    14 Jan 2014, 07:58 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    LabTech, u hit the nail on the head, it's the system that counts. This example and above conversation shows how that window of opportunity has already closed. IMO, TG should have worked with ABB & others on their systems & not just BMW.

     

    I mentioned this on the revealing of the PC...how the system was the key.

     

    IMO, the PBC could very well be better suited to a combination of some longer discharge battery like the solar farm they landed where half the batteries are AGM & the other half PbC for the load leveling.

     

    Let the PbC shine in the fast charge/discharge part, and something else do the longer release.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:05 AM Reply Like
  • Mac325
    , contributor
    Comments (21) | Send Message
     
    Another Boeing 787 battery fire reported. This one is after the recent recall where safety related upgrades were introduced:

     

    http://yhoo.it/1dt6IHB
    14 Jan 2014, 12:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    D Lane, Thanks.

     

    Success with no data supplied and they are changing the design. Hmmm. I can smell their success I'm afraid.
    -
    Mac325, Uggh. I can't even imagine how much money this has already cost BA and it continues. I guess that's what you can expect when you can't find a route cause but you declare the problem solved.

     

    Well at least they contained it in a big ole box and vented it. So much for the weight savings.
    14 Jan 2014, 01:20 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1702) | Send Message
     
    ii

     

    Yeah, where is the data? IIRC this is funded by the feds (FTA?) and data should be available eventually.
    14 Jan 2014, 02:07 PM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    And Boeings' stock price nearly doubled in that time.
    14 Jan 2014, 03:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Kent. It's good to be part of a duopoly in some very large markets that are doing well with increasing demand and fuel prices making older equipment obsolete fast.
    14 Jan 2014, 04:45 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (3699) | Send Message
     
    Is the OTC board down again?
    14 Jan 2014, 01:38 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Stilldazed: not as far as I can see - just slow trading for some extended periods. But we've done ~500K shares.

     

    Last trade at 13:37.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jan 2014, 01:43 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Stilldazed, Not that I can see. I'm getting bid/ask and saw a recent AXPW trade.
    14 Jan 2014, 01:44 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (3699) | Send Message
     
    HTL and ii,
    Thanks for the response. Had to restart my computer and all is reading fine now. Oops. Too many times in sleep mode. ;-)
    14 Jan 2014, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    FINRA Missing 27,499 of trade volume again. That's enough that it could include a noticeable number of short sales.

     

    I'll be hamstrung again on my EOD stuff it looks like.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jan 2014, 05:46 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (483) | Send Message
     
    HTL, what is their contact address? Maybe if a few hundred of us here contact them they might get on the ball.
    15 Jan 2014, 01:54 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Masi: SA screws up the e-mail addy. I've inserted spaces - remove them all.

     

    Prod Mgmt Transparency Svcs @finra.org

     

    Being an SRO (Self-Regulatory Organization) in the financial industry, ostensibly operating under the aegis of the SEC which has not been all that responsive to fixing problems IMO, I doubt that we can have much impact. To whom are they beholden: the users of the services that provide no funding or those that fund their operations?

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 08:17 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (483) | Send Message
     
    Thanx HTL. I went there and then went to contacts but could find no category along the lines of missing/inaccurate info. I remember you posting a couple of weeks back that you had contacted them and they replied they would get back to you. Just who was it that you informed of the problem?
    15 Jan 2014, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Masi: The url above that ends in "@finra.org" is the contact point for this stuff.

     

    Copy it, remove all the spaces and use it as the e-mail recipient.

     

    That's the only contact I've got I know is current for these issues. Last I searched for other potential contacts they all seem oriented towards industry professionals.

     

    I did phone and e-mail someone else long ago about similar issues (and other folks about web site problems) and they helped and eventually pointed me to this group. Since July of 2011, I suspect those old addresses are not useful.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 09:25 AM Reply Like
  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (402) | Send Message
     
    $0.10

     

    Gobble gobble

     

    May get to 1 million shares yet
    14 Jan 2014, 06:13 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1110) | Send Message
     
    Dlmca, may you get your million shares, and may you become a multi-millionaire. :) --- Soon!
    15 Jan 2014, 12:48 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    01/14/2014: EOD stuff partially copied to the concentrator.
    # Trds: 85, MinTrSz: 169, MaxTrSz: 64700, Vol: 771170, AvTrSz: 9073
    Min. Pr: 0.0960, Max Pr: 0.1040, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.0993
    # Buys, Shares: 36 245127, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1002
    # Sells, Shares: 48 511044, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.0989
    # Unkn, Shares: 1 14999, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0980
    Buy:Sell 1:2.08 (31.79% "buys"), DlyShts 91633 (11.88%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 17.93%

     

    FINRA reported trade volume was missing 27,499 today. This is large enough that a noticeable number of daily shorts might be in the missing volume. I went ahead and used what they reported and will revise them when the “work-around” comes available at 9:30 tomorrow ... if it actually “works around” again. So be aware that anything related to daily short sales is subject to revision.

     

    Yesterday I said “In aggregate, an expected return to “normalcy” today?” after describing action outside the “Sold Rush of '14”. Today seems to confirm a return to normalcy.

     

    Today 13 of the 85 trades were ~15K or larger, ...

     

    The average of the lowest 20 VWAPs times 80% today is $0.0823 vs. $0.0828, $0.0831, $0.0834, $0.0838, $0.0846 and $0.0849 on prior days. 80% of today's VWAP is $0.0794 vs. $0.0827, $0.0842, $0.0819, $0.0808, $0.0809 and $0.0831 on prior days. These are potential prices for the next tranche of shares to the PIPErs.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved -4.48%, -2.80%, -3.94%, -14.75% and -12.39% (subject to revision)respectively. Price spread today was 8.33% vs. 6.47%, 11.13%, 1.90%, 5.80% and 8.08% prior days.

     

    On the traditional TA stuff everything is essentially the same as yesterday. The short-term descending resistance continues to apparently provide a ceiling. Trading above it today was much lower than the prior days and we again closed below it. The value appears to be about $0.1020 today.

     

    We again had a lower open, close, high, low and volume.

     

    As I said yesterday, trading lower is looking most likely and today we did so.

     

    The oscillators I watch continue to support dissipation of any signs of strength. All but the momentum indicator continue weakening. ...

     

    Additional thoughts and stats are in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jan 2014, 07:46 PM Reply Like
  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (205) | Send Message
     
    "pg42-"If thermal variation identified thus far exceeding 10 °C
    cannot be reduced, viability of road locomotive hybrids using the PbC® technology is questionable"

     

    Why is there a huge white elephant standing in my stock room? Can someone please explain why is is not very worrying. Seems to stand out as a major issue. JP, is temperate variation one of the variables ePower is looking at?
    15 Jan 2014, 05:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It hasn't been an issue for us, which is not the same as saying it won't be an issue. The materials on page 42 ware part of a summer 2012 expansion of the Grant/Cooperative Agreement between NS and the FRA (see dates on page 33). A year later NS publicly said:

     

    "In 2013, we plan to roll out the next generation NS 999, outfitted with a bank of more technologically advanced hybrid lead-carbon batteries developed by industry partner Axion Power International.

     

    In addition to NS 999, we are continuing work on a prototype battery-powered road locomotive that would move freight over long distances.

     

    We are optimistic that our latest efforts will provide a foundation for development of affordable battery-powered locomotives."

     

    When pulling together bits and pieces of a puzzle from different documents, I've found that the latest document usually contains the most up-to-date assessment. Since the Sustainability Report reflects another year of progress, I'm not going to obsess over a 2012 statement of challenge.
    15 Jan 2014, 06:59 AM Reply Like
  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (205) | Send Message
     
    JP, thanks for the reply. Obviously NS seemed confident enough to press ahead with axion even if there was some questions about the thermal performance.
    Can I ask if you know of any specific data regarding PbC performance at different temperatures?
    15 Jan 2014, 08:44 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Aside from Axion's general statements that the PbC performs better than lead-acid 1.0 (flooded) and 2.0 (AGM) at both low and high temperatures, I don't recall seeing much in the way of specifics.

     

    In general, chemical reactions slow down at low temperatures but capacitive reactions don't. The chemical reactions in a PbC happen at the same rate as the chemical reactions in lead-acid 1.0 and 2.0, so the real reason for the improved low temperature performance is about 13,000 Farads of capacitance from the carbon electrodes.
    15 Jan 2014, 08:57 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    As indicated before mass and volume are very important to the industry. I do wonder where else they are making compromises to the long standing requirements for the storage system.

     

    JCI preps lightweight lead-acid battery

     

    http://bit.ly/K1UXvf#

     

    Edit: For some reason the link takes you to a subscription required pg. Just search for the title and go to the "Automotive News" link and it gives you the entire article. Jeez.
    15 Jan 2014, 07:44 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I find JCI's stated weight reduction goal intriguing.

     

    A 30HT AGM battery from Lifeline tips the scale at 96 pounds – http://bit.ly/1iUjA9h

     

    The PowerCube spec sheet from Rosewater pegged the weight of a 30HT PbC at 73 pounds, or 24% lighter.

     

    The most curious bit was the last paragraph, "The cost may not be lower initially for a lightweight battery, she said, because removing weight increases costs for engineering, manufacturing and possibly materials, depending on the chemistry used in the battery."

     

    AFAIK there is only one lightweight lead-acid battery chemistry.
    15 Jan 2014, 08:22 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    And in only a year. Hmmm. Sounds like they've been working on it awhile. ;)

     

    That would be a big surprise for the other big BK LAB supplier.

     

    Edit: And based on the margins talked about in the second article posted these ones might seem down right frivolous. Plus it extends the runway for all that AGM capacity that JCI has. I remember one of their older articles pointing out that the good ole LAB still has years of life remaining in automotive. I'll agree w/ that.
    15 Jan 2014, 02:05 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    ii - which second article are you referring to?
    15 Jan 2014, 02:28 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    This one Stefan. Note the price the autos are paying directionally for LABS.

     

    Small scale battery storage costs tipped to fall quickly

     

    http://bit.ly/1dQ7Foo
    15 Jan 2014, 02:38 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2851) | Send Message
     
    JP - well then, if she is correct, AXPW should have sufficient justification for higher priced PbC's acceptable to the commercial world, performance being acceptable or demonstrated as superior to the competition.
    15 Jan 2014, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Gives you an idea of the type of pricing pressure one can expect in automotive.

     

    Small scale battery storage costs tipped to fall quickly

     

    "“Four years ago it was predicted that the prices for battery cells, if you buy large quantities as car manufacturers do, would go below €200/kWh for cells by 2020,” said Sauer. “What you see today is that prices are well below this. Tesla is probably buying battery cells from Japanese manufacturers for US$150/kWh.”

     

    For storage systems in homes, where weight and volume restrictions don’t apply as they do to cars, lead acid batteries can also be applied. Sauer says here too major cost reductions can be expected. “In home systems today, lead acid batteries are sold to the end user at €150 to €200/kWh, yet battery suppliers for car starter engines are sold to automotive manufacturers for €25/kWh.”"

     

    http://bit.ly/1dQ7Foo
    15 Jan 2014, 08:00 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: " Tesla is probably buying battery cells from Japanese manufacturers for US$150/kWh"

     

    That author ought to think about JP's noting operating at a small loss vs. shutdown costs on written-down P&E.

     

    I wonder what pricing for similar (out of date?) 18650s would be from a manufacturer that didn't have that situation - that is wanted to operate the P & E at a profit?

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 08:25 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The most authoritative estimate I've found for the price Tesla pays for cells is a September 2013 blog from Lux Research that says, "About 16,000 Model S units have been sold thus far, accounting for more than $400 million in revenues for Panasonic."

     

    http://bit.ly/1942L63

     

    That figure works out to $25,000 per car or about $300 per kWh for an 85 kWh battery pack.

     

    Since this blog was focused on Panasonic's business rather than Tesla's, I have a hard time believing that Lux got it wrong by 50%.
    15 Jan 2014, 08:38 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Understood and agree HTL.

     

    Maybe Panasonic made it back on TSLA stock. Might be wise for people to watch their holdings for signs of a relationship change.
    15 Jan 2014, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (205) | Send Message
     
    Sorry to repost. Original popped up above...JP, thanks for the reply. Obviously NS seemed confident enough to press ahead with axion even if there was some questions about the thermal performance.
    Can I ask if you know of any specific data regarding PbC performance at different temperatures?
    15 Jan 2014, 08:51 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The answer I provided above said:

     

    Aside from Axion's general statements that the PbC performs better than lead-acid 1.0 (flooded) and 2.0 (AGM) at both low and high temperatures, I don't recall seeing much in the way of specifics.

     

    In general, chemical reactions slow down at low temperatures but capacitive reactions don't. The chemical reactions in a PbC happen at the same rate as the chemical reactions in lead-acid 1.0 and 2.0, so the real reason for the improved low temperature performance is about 13,000 Farads of capacitance from the carbon electrodes.
    15 Jan 2014, 09:20 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    OK, ARCA came it at 11:19 and undercut the $0.1039 offer to $0.10.

     

    Place your bids and we'll get a few trades ... maybe.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Well, they sold 9K and went away!

     

    Back to $0.1039 best offer.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Interesting: ARCA left and NITE immediately appears with a $0.10 offer. NITE leaves and ARCA immediately comes with $0.10 offer.

     

    Think someone's trying to mess with us by shifting orders around to different MMs?

     

    I've noticed similar action a few times over the last few weeks.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • RyanfBell
    , contributor
    Comments (68) | Send Message
     
    The news about the AGM getting lighter seems to be good news for all if it's legit.

     

    Other then money issues what would stop axion from just buying batteries from JCI and putting the electrode on them.
    15 Jan 2014, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The carbon electrode assemblies that distinguish the PbC from a conventional AGM battery are internal components that are built into the battery during the manufacturing process. They can't be added afterwards.
    15 Jan 2014, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (512) | Send Message
     
    The carbon electrodes can be supplied to another battery manufacturer for assembly. I believe that TG has said that they have successfully done this as a requirement for a European auto manufacturer.

     

    AXPW and TG had the where-with-all to buy a manufacturing plant that was about to be dismantled for parts, along with a certification for 2000 batteries/day. It expect that it would take some deep pockets and lots of time and determination to acquire a permit for a new battery factory in the US.
    15 Jan 2014, 01:05 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    A couple quick clarifications.

     

    First, one of our principal development goals was getting the electrode assemblies in a format and form factor that would allow drop-in substitution in any AGM battery plant in the world because it greatly simplifies the adoption path and reduces ramp costs. Axion has demonstrated that ability with two other battery manufacturers, rather than one.

     

    Second, the New Castle plant is equipped and permitted for 3,000 units per day, although two of the three lines were designed for flooded rather than AGM batteries. Rather than building new battery plants for its own account, Axion wants to become a component supplier for other manufacturers. As long as Axion makes the electrodes, it doesn't really matter who makes the batteries. The component supplier roadmap offers a simpler and cheaper growth path that can leverage manufacturing experience, existing facilities, sales networks and customer relationships.

     

    The ultimate goal is "Axion Inside."
    15 Jan 2014, 02:00 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    I see pessimism is at an all-time-high again.
    15 Jan 2014, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (332) | Send Message
     
    Just curious Patrick, pessimism based on what, I don't see it.
    Price?
    Concentrator comments?
    Google trends?

     

    Thanks, geopark
    15 Jan 2014, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    Patrick, We all tend to vent our frustration, even those of us who are generally optimistic about the outcome. Those who are very frustrated tend to vent on a regular basis. The slow pace and delayed fulfillment of promises has tried the patience of all of us. Even NSC has been delayed on its promise to have the NS 999 on the rails by the end of 2013. (Unless of course they are hiding its operation.)

     

    Those of us who believe that ePower is about to give us some good news and other good developments are soon to follow, simply read the comments and buy some more when we have some dry powder. I just bought 12500 more the last two days.
    15 Jan 2014, 11:53 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    I follow this blog closely, and I have noticed a great deal of angst lately (since the last CC), not only among the investors who just joined the party but also some investors who have been around at least a year. The TG hating and general panic surrounding events that have nothing to do with an Axion investment thesis have reached a crescendo. What do we care if some French company is making batteries for a French island project? Or if a public transport green project has a contract with someone else - I am actually grateful Axion is not putting its future in the hands of the, gasp, government. BMW+unnamed auto manufacturers, NSC, and ePower are slow to fully adopt the techology, but it's not like they are disappointed in the performance. On top of that we've got MultiLink, an unexpected bonus, and an unknown number of PC customers. At no time has an Axion product failed to meet the customer needs. Numerous engineers have vetted the value of this technology on this blog. The only thing lacking at Axion is patience among its shareholders.
    15 Jan 2014, 03:40 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    Patrick....what is lacking at AXPW is "sales" instead of shareholders.

     

    "The only thing lacking at Axion is patience among its shareholders."
    15 Jan 2014, 04:04 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1110) | Send Message
     
    "The only thing lacking at Axion is patience among its shareholders."

     

    I continue to TRY to be patient because of the numerous positives you point out, but it's especially difficult on a major down day, which also happens to be on the 15th, the monthly anniversary of TG's cc assurances of impending sales and revenue (8/15/13).

     

    I might just point out that many of us who have hung on for a long time (to our great detriment), did so primarily because of similar forward looking statements by TG over the past 2-3 years. Given how believing him has cost so many shareholders so much money, the “TG hating” seems rather muted to me.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:13 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    Patrick, speaking only for myself, my "TG hating and general panic" has everything to do with Axion. It has been one broken promise after another; missed deadline after missed deadline. Do I need to list them all for you? Do you have any idea what is going to happen if VWAP falls below 0.09, which is less than a penny away? Each time we are forced to sweeten the deal for the PIPErs, it exponentially increases the dilution to us. The only thing that is going to keep us from drowning in a sea of dilutioin is battery sales. Lots and lots of battery sales. Not a half a power cube here and there and not six months from now. Those "significant sales" need to happen within the next month or the stock price WILL fall below 0.09.

     

    Sure, the technology is great, lots of testing, unparalleled charge acceptance, yada yada ya. All that won't mean a thing to you and me if some vulture investors own 99% of it.

     

    I'm starting to think there is a Stockholm syndrome going on here. Or, maybe it is more like the abused spouse, who after being smacked down yet again, says "but he loves me."
    15 Jan 2014, 04:49 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    NGS: We can';t expect one who has not yet suffered the slings and arrows of our outrageous misfortunes to be as negative as we have become.

     

    It takes time, enough lashes with the whips, ... to become sufficiently jaded to see the full scope of possibilities reality presents.

     

    I just hope that Patrick doesn't have to become so - I wouldn't wish that for anyone.

     

    But we do need to be mindful that we may be overly pessimistic as the game has gone against us so many ways for so long.

     

    We have to work a lot harder to be balanced in our expectations now. So ...

     

    I figure if "fails to deliver" occurs 99 times, the 100th attempt may be the winner! :-))

     

    I know, I know. No one likes an "infernal" optimist. ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 05:26 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (2001) | Send Message
     
    NGS,

     

    I am with you here, Stockholm syndrome is in full swing here IMHO but I am so down on this position that bailing out at this stage is probably not worth it!
    16 Jan 2014, 07:21 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Careful how you apply your statement to the board. This is a very diverse group with varying perspectives on Axion and its management. Trying to corral everyone into one category is a fruitless exercise.
    16 Jan 2014, 07:30 AM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (2001) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco,

     

    Sorry I didn't mean to offend anyone or generalize my reaction to others on this board. My reaction is mainly emotional torture arising from holding a penny stock for an extended period of time that doesn't seem to live to the rosy scenarios I keep hearing from the management in place. My reactions are purely mine and should be taken accordingly !
    16 Jan 2014, 08:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Amouna, No offense taken. I share your frustration for sure.
    16 Jan 2014, 08:29 AM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    "Trying to corral everyone into one category is a fruitless exercise."
    http://bit.ly/YgXfws
    16 Jan 2014, 10:11 PM Reply Like
  • pascquale
    , contributor
    Comments (143) | Send Message
     
    Dilbert's worth seeing today for Elon fans
    http://www.dilbert.com
    15 Jan 2014, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    And the beat goes on:

     

    http://cnn.it/L6byya

     

    "got a man of the people sayin' keep hope alive..
    got fuel to burn, got roads to drive"
    15 Jan 2014, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Press Release: USABC ISSUES RFPI FOR DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HIGH-PERFORMANCE BATTERIES FOR 48V HEV APPLICATIONS

     

    "SOUTHFIELD, Mich., Jan. 3, 2014 – The United States Advanced Battery Consortium LLC (USABC), a collaborative organization operated by Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors, has issued a request for proposal information (RFPI) for the development of advanced high-performance batteries for 48-volt mild-hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) applications.

     

    The RFPI, for consideration of contracts that will include a 50 percent minimum cost share, is focused on the development of advanced battery systems for emerging 48V HEV applications. It is aimed at developers with electrochemical energy storage technologies that are capable of meeting or approaching the USABC technology targets for FY 2020 commercialization."

     

    http://bit.ly/1b40mbX
    15 Jan 2014, 03:40 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    Great find iindelco! It sounds like an RFPI right down Axion's alley.

     

    The submission deadline is Friday, Feb. 14, 2014.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:08 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Appendix A to the full RFP makes it clear that the deck is stacked. With a target weight of <8 kg and a target volume under 8 liters, there's little or no potential for anything but lithium.

     

    http://bit.ly/Lf6cRV
    15 Jan 2014, 04:10 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    Still apply and focus on the price differential. Include the cost difference for one battery in nickels when you ship your batteries with the quote.

     

    "The PbC - We want to show you that we can do the same as Lithium. Like you we throw our nickels around like manhole covers.

     

    Love, TG and Vani"
    15 Jan 2014, 04:33 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    Didn't we go through another RFPI challenge two years back? Nothing came of it and I expect a similar result now. Li-on is king and little else need bother.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    That is a good opportunity. I guess Axion would have to team with somebody to participate in this because they are too broke to put up the 50% cost share portion of any new development.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    Even lithium would have trouble meeting those criteria. Only the most combustible LiPO stands a chance of meeting those specs.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:58 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    who within USABC has set this requirement and why?
    15 Jan 2014, 08:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Albert, The USABC has contributors from GM, Ford and Chrysler with the intent of the group being to reach for technology that would satisfy their needs at some future point. These are technologies that are not in existence today and are defined as stretch goals in their stated requirements. A stretch goal being one that exceeds what is available in the industry and thus requires development.
    15 Jan 2014, 09:18 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    ii

     

    I understand the goal but why the 8kg/8ltr limit?

     

    What makes those numbers so important, why not 7/7 or 11/11?
    16 Jan 2014, 06:40 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Albert, Not being part of the brain trust I couldn't say why this metric was selected. I would hope it came from gathering data from experts in the field and a level of assessing future business plans/requirements.

     

    In the end they better not be cutting off their nose to spite their face. The US automotive concerns are gifted in this regard. As is our political structure as it comes to manufacturing IMO. Well perhaps the later concern not as a whole.
    16 Jan 2014, 06:49 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    8kg/8L implies the density of water at 1kg/L. That will be impossible, even for the lightest lithium. I wonder how they came up with that as a goal. They must have something in mind that they think can achieve that. Or, it could be a typo.
    16 Jan 2014, 08:54 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    ngs,
    The DOE has discovered a new element: Obaminium. It's created in the beltway accelerator by slamming together one part hope with three parts hype.

     

    It's lighter than reality.
    16 Jan 2014, 09:01 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Air battery?
    16 Jan 2014, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    TB: I think so - I heard some genius in his basement invented it to power his air guitar.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jan 2014, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1299) | Send Message
     
    SMaurin, is that the opposite of Bushwackium, which is heavy enough to sink an entire economy?
    16 Jan 2014, 11:31 AM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    trip

     

    Surely you meant Air Heads!
    16 Jan 2014, 11:36 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    They are at opposite ends of the periodic table. Left and Right.

     

    The EPA has outlawed the use of Bushwhackium, and the IRS is auditing all of its former suppliers.

     

    Obaminium, on the other hand, is getting billions in dark federal funding because those Air Batteries will be needed to power the NSA server farms when the Tea Partiers cut off their electricity and water.
    16 Jan 2014, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    I usually stay away from the political comments, but this whole string was very clever.
    16 Jan 2014, 02:00 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    ;-)

     

    Laughter is the best way of coping with the circus in Washington.

     

    I think the founding fathers should have put a clause in the Constitution requiring all Federal officials to wear clown makeup.

     

    They could charge admission to the galleries in Congress and balance the Federal budget.
    16 Jan 2014, 02:52 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin, They are not wearing clown makeup? I guess I often listen to their rhetoric with my eyes on another task and my imagination filled in the blanks! ;-D
    16 Jan 2014, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    "Laughter is the best way of coping with the circus in Washington".

     

    I don't know, I'd be supportive of tar and feathers and a rail I think.

     

    For those that ignore the constitution, take money for <bleeped> up all the time, pick my pocket and give it to others, sell their souls to large donors and corporations, ...

     

    Even that is probably too good for them.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    16 Jan 2014, 03:08 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    I see clown makeup as a preventative measure.

     

    Tarring and feathering is a curative measure once the Political Disease has taken root.
    16 Jan 2014, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • RyanfBell
    , contributor
    Comments (68) | Send Message
     
    Does start stop ,48v and Pbc all work in the same sentence. I assume space is at a premium and at minimum 3 batteries at 16v would do as is required unless one 16v can be stepped up to handle it all.

     

    Would you be willing to give up your full size spare for such a system.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:19 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    To make a high voltage system while controlling space and weight you'd use much smaller batteries to keep total energy in the same range while increasing total power. Doing it all within the confines of an 8 kg weight limit, however, is a non-starter.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    How much room do you think a 48v PbC version would take and what would you approximate it to weigh?
    15 Jan 2014, 04:28 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    It looks like Axion is going to have to prove itself in some application, like ePower or NSC, before the auto engineers are going to sacrifice weight limits for cost and function.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:28 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    RyanfBell: It's really just a packaging issue, along with lots of very(?) expensive re-tooling of manufacturing lines, for LAB stuff. 48v can be achieved by cramming more cells into the battery. If you want the same space, thinner cells, implying some potential drawbacks if you have problems with sulfation, erosion, ...

     

    Total energy content would likely be lower because of losses due to required additional non-active materials. Everything would be more fragile too. QC might be more difficult. Best slution might be a battery case change - larger, different shape, ...

     

    Just wanted to point out that there are solutions other than 3 x 16v batteries or 4 x 12v batteries. These have placement issues, which you mention.

     

    No easy solution right now for LAB manufacturers I think.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    15 Jan 2014, 04:31 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Ryan, Many cars are already being sold not with a full sized spare and not with a dognut spare but only with a can of pressurized leak sealant. All to reduce weight. Oh and cost.
    15 Jan 2014, 04:44 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Stefan> My technical expertise is not deep enough to even try and estimate the minimum weight and volume of a 48-volt PbC, but I'm pretty comfortable that 17.6 pounds is awful light when you figure that a standard automotive battery weighs about 39 pounds.

     

    http://bit.ly/1eKBk6c
    15 Jan 2014, 05:06 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Stephan: Ever since someone, well...I believe it was me around this time last year, linked that JCI was going toward a 48V + 12V battery configuration, I have held serious questions about whether Axion will ever be involved with stop/start vehicles.

     

    He's a November 7, 2013 link titled: Will Small 48-Volt Lithium-Ion Battery Boost Start-Stop In U.S. Cars?

     

    http://bit.ly/1dtM5cU

     

    For those speculating about how large JCI's 48V micro hybrid battery is, please read the below extract from the above link:

     

    --The company has developed a compact battery pack that's no larger than a shoebox, the Detroit News reports.

     

    ####

     

    As far as I know, Axion is not working on a 48V battery, and would expect that there's no way Axion's techies can get a 48V battery to be the size of a shoebox, and still have stop/start work.

     

    Besides, though JP stated that R&D expenses can be moved (or obscured) to some other part of a 10-Q balance sheet (given that Axion no longer has a R&D expense line on their latest 10Qs), which means to me that Axion has no intention of developing a 48 V battery to compete with Goliath Johnson Controls.

     

    Of course, Axion may have never intended to compete in the micro hybrid biz to begin with.
    15 Jan 2014, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    "Axion may have never intended to compete in the micro hybrid biz to begin with."

     

    Oh wouldn't that be rich.
    15 Jan 2014, 09:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, Don't worry about it. 48VDC is so far out Axion will be successful or gone long before you'll see it scaled. Just in case you haven't noticed we need some sales or a hand shake soon enough.

     

    As for Axion not intending to compete in the micro hybrid biz. Bull hockey. They haven't spent the level of resources they have with BMW and some others at times because they love automotive test cycle torture. Their sweet spot would however be the higher volume 12 VDC architecture.
    15 Jan 2014, 09:32 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    48VDC is a third generation micro hybrid platform that won't be rolled out in significant numbers until 2020 and beyond, and there's no way to know today what the competitive technologies will be by that point in time. It's interesting for the ultra long term, but irrelevant to Axion's current investment potential.

     

    Axions's sweet spot will be in the second generation, which is what Tom has always spoken of.
    15 Jan 2014, 09:39 PM Reply