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  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (204) | Send Message
     
    You can be in my dreams if i can be in yours. I said that.
    14 Apr 2014, 06:34 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    :)
    14 Apr 2014, 06:34 AM Reply Like
  • Josh Greene
    , contributor
    Comments (78) | Send Message
     
    Let's hope we see a nice bounce back up this week.
    14 Apr 2014, 06:48 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    If not this week, we should get some kind of bounce when the long-anticipated significant sales announcement is made. T minus 31 days and counting.
    14 Apr 2014, 09:38 AM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (516) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Iterating: Discussions of the relative safety of Li-* vs. LA* do not belong here any longer. Might be interesting to some, but I can't see continuation is gong to affect investing decisions. Start your own war blog if you want to continue would be my suggestion.

     

    As usual, it deteriorates into inappropriate comments.
    14 Apr 2014, 06:57 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (984) | Send Message
     
    A "bone" from ePower would be nice. The sudden end to regular status updates sure feels like a NDA went into effect. Which would be "No News is Good News" but, typical for things Axion related.

     

    I know, stop your whining, "We'll update when we have something to say." Thing is, expectations were set when there was frequent updates and the stopping of them is "interesting". Hasn't even been a "Day Cab status."
    14 Apr 2014, 08:24 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    As I said last week, I'm expecting Jay to provide a status update to ePower's stockholders soon. It would be very bad form for me to gossip with friends beforehand.
    14 Apr 2014, 08:39 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    It will be even nicer when Axion reports a substantial sale before the year end CC.
    14 Apr 2014, 08:55 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    The fundraising atmosphere is not that bad ...

     

    http://nyti.ms/1t0qmR5
    14 Apr 2014, 10:50 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    Rarely does "are we there yet" get us there faster. But often it can slow down the process when dad pulls the car over and has to "talk" to everyone about back seat driver etiquette.
    14 Apr 2014, 01:02 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (984) | Send Message
     
    I suspect we have first time readers every day but, if we don't make mention of ePower, that huge potential might be overlooked.

     

    Besides, I bought Axion before steady sales so, I obviously have poor impulse control.
    14 Apr 2014, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    GT
    "Besides, I bought Axion before steady sales so, I obviously have poor impulse control. "

     

    I suspect you are not entirely alone here in that regard.
    ;)
    14 Apr 2014, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    GT: There's lots of stuff linked in the header that covers our major opportunities. If newcomers really are reading, I suspect they wouldn't have that much uncertainty generated because they didn't see some daily minor commentary about it.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    14 Apr 2014, 03:28 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    >Stefan ... thanks for the fundraising article.

     

    Seems to me to reduce the risk of going to work for startups ... the potential was always huge, but there was much more risk about having to find jobs more often if the horse you bet on didn't make it.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (810) | Send Message
     
    I haven't signed an NDA, so here ya go:

     

    1) Things are progressing nicely on the day cab, but our people are concentrating on heavier OTR units.

     

    2) Our heavier truck concentration efforts are proving to provide positive steps, but at a rate slower than we would like. We're still working on it.

     

    Next update in 45 days.
    14 Apr 2014, 08:56 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Is 45 days the normal interval?
    14 Apr 2014, 10:02 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    There is no normal interval. Jay tries to send an update to our shareholders every couple weeks. For the last few weeks we've been puzzling our way through a control system issue that's kept us from getting as much power from the engine and generator in the truck as we got when Cummins tested the engine and generator on the shop floor. The process has required a ton of data collection and four-way communication with engineers from Cummins, Marathon and Unico. We think we've found a solution, but won't know until we try the idea and find out. Sometimes there's just nothing to talk about.
    14 Apr 2014, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Any color you could add on the process would be interesting ...

     

    Once a particular solution is proposed, how long does a test to run to assess the result?

     

    Is it a matter of minutes, hours, ??

     

    Are there a (long?) series of tests, all of which have to be performed in series, e.g., from on the "shop floor" through actually taking the truck on the road?

     

    Is there frequently a "quick fail" test (actually what you hope for ... something that gives you key info quickly without a huge investment of "effort")?

     

    Have there been mostly quick fails or slow fails (or as I suppose Edison might term them, "information discoveries")?
    14 Apr 2014, 10:52 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Are you guys doing any "computer" coding?

     

    I am reminded of this recent article on the "Heartbleed" Huge Deal Security bug:

     

    How The Internet's Worst Nightmare Could Have Been Avoided
    Posted: 04/10/2014 7:48 am EDT

     

    "The programmers don’t have time to check every line of code for flaws and can’t afford to pay someone else to do it. A formal audit of software code can cost at least $100,000 and often costs much more, according to Laurie"

     

    http://huff.to/1t0wkRU

     

    If you are doing any coding, I'm guessing there are several of us here who would offer to "code review" if you could figure out a safe way to do it, or pull out small enough pieces to be comfortable with it.

     

    Assuming you guys aren't doing any coding, have you asked your providers what types of software audits they're doing on their code? You guys could be doing "everything right," but some weird interactions between the various pieces could be leading to situations they didn't expect and haven't coded for.

     

    This can be VERY frustrating (not to mention time consuming) for the users of the software/firmware!

     

    A related possibility is that the programs expect certain pieces of data that you haven't actually set, but the program doesn't check that it hasn't been set and in the worst case actually gives random results because it's getting "random input."

     

    GIGO as we've said for many years ... Garbage In, Garbage Out.
    14 Apr 2014, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    Our bigger challenge is getting four different sets of code from four different component suppliers to play nice together while we find ways to make the different control hardware to communicate and cooperate.

     

    It's all basically one big bug hunt.
    14 Apr 2014, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (984) | Send Message
     
    The good side is that your IP becomes more valuable the harder it is to reach the solution.
    Assuming of course you are not choosing to "do it the hard way."
    I've seen that so many times. You can keep trying to break a hole through the wall, or you can step back and realize that throwing a rope over the top works just as well.
    14 Apr 2014, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    GT, I'm not sure that there is a direct correlation between the cost and effort that goes into a patent and the eventual value. This is not to say there is no relationship within certain industries.
    14 Apr 2014, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • tongas
    , contributor
    Comments (40) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1gxvI0M

     

    I guess that's their job,but might be perhaps a bit expensive solution for a young company.
    14 Apr 2014, 04:26 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    "we've been puzzling our way through a control system issue that's kept us from getting as much power from the engine and generator in the truck as we got when Cummins tested the engine and generator on the shop floor. "

     

    Did the engine-generator shop floor test include the battery pack? If not, perhaps that "four-way communication with engineers from ...) should be five way and include Axion. According to TG (April '14 cc), "Each converted ePower truck now has 56 PbC batteries in a sophisticated Battery Management System proprietary to Axion. The system regulates fuel consumption by providing boost power when needed to accelerate, navigate grade variances, and initially bring the truck up to speed, all while allowing the motor and generator to operate at a constant rate."
    14 Apr 2014, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (984) | Send Message
     
    Since the engine on the Day Cab is the same as the Sleeper, it seems to me that they should have the Sleeper on the road collecting real data with real loads.
    The tuning of the controls could be done with the Day Cab. Time is not on their side. Cash is bleeding.

     

    I understand the ultimate goal is for everything to be automated and drive-able by anybody but, the first truck is only one and there should be drivers with the skills to control it.

     

    Yes, once they get to volume conversions they will want all the bells and whistles including start/stop and APC. Initially they need real world data and a lot of it. That takes time and should start as soon as possible. I doubt NSC or BMW will share all their test data so they need their own.

     

    IMHO of course. I look at the calendar and think how many months past "next week" we are.

     

    --- and then there was a new update... thumbs up for them!
    15 Apr 2014, 08:07 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    A company like ePower only gets one chance to make a good first impression with fleet operators and putting a sub-optimal drivetrain on the road is suicidal, particularly when you've identified a problem and a solution.

     

    I'm sorry if you're unhappy with pace of our progress but criticizing things you don't understand is offensive. It's also a big reason companies keep development projects shrouded in black canvas until they're finished.
    15 Apr 2014, 08:25 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Graphs w/ no numbers. No mention of warranty improvement.

     

    Hey, we came clean that our older deep cycle batteries most often didn't deliver the life we promised, as mentioned in the article, but we're not lying this time.

     

    The author works in, drum roll, "sales".

     

    Battery Update: Carbon resolves partial state of charge

     

    "The single most important factor to consider when purchasing a deep-cycle battery for a renewable energy application is cycle life, which is the number of discharge/charge cycles the battery can provide over its lifetime. Many find that deep-cycle batteries used in renewable energy (RE) applications never reach their expected cycle life, but they do not know why. The answer is simple - the occurrence of Partial State of Charge (PSOC) in which the batteries are often never fully recharged on a regular basis."

     

    " Consistent PSOC cycling is harmful to the battery and leads to significant reductions in cycle life. Addressing the issue of PSOC and its impact on battery performance and overall life has remained a challenge - until now. Advancements in carbon technology and its addition to lead acid batteries has shown to extend the life of deep-cycle batteries designed for RE, telecom and inverter backup applications."

     

    http://bit.ly/1eEuuN4
    14 Apr 2014, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    "but we're not lying this time." Yeah, about that ...
    14 Apr 2014, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    Sounds like a sales pitch. Vani should blog something similar for the PbC.
    14 Apr 2014, 01:28 PM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (810) | Send Message
     
    ii, the arrows just seem to brush against the hair of our arms as they go into the target. Discussions of carbon paste, "smart carbon" (as opposed to dumbo carbon?) and carbonized carbon, etc. just seem to zip right past us. It's is becoming exceptionally annoying.

     

    Sooner or later the arrow will hit us squarely and we'll be delighted. Seems odd, yes? Hit by the arrow between the eyes would make us giddy? :>)
    14 Apr 2014, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    VW, TG must feel like Arnold Horshack trying to get attention but rarely succeeding. Then when he does get a chance to speak it's in private and confidentiality is demanded.

     

    http://bit.ly/1eECqOp

     

    Then again, If you will not share DATA....
    14 Apr 2014, 10:04 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Keeping the EV guys up at night. Match this with some SS and low level launch assist "creeping" and you got a very compelling package. With a respectable battery that is.

     

    Toyota Gasoline Engine Achieves Thermal Efficiency Of 38 Percent

     

    http://bit.ly/1t0w59n
    14 Apr 2014, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • tahoe1780
    , contributor
    Comments (110) | Send Message
     
    Nice. I just saw that here: http://bit.ly/1eF7LAu
    14 Apr 2014, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    Ford has been using an Atkinson engine since 2009/2010 - for the Fusion and others. It's a high compression engine. Matches up real well with electric motors which provide the missing torque.
    14 Apr 2014, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Be there soon unless the delivery boy arrives.

     

    "You know the nearer your destination the more you're slip sliding away."

     

    http://bit.ly/1t0x21n
    14 Apr 2014, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Viridity is in the SEPTA mix:

     

    http://bit.ly/1t0DTYH
    14 Apr 2014, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    "SEPTA projects it will earn between $150 000 and $200 000 annually from its battery."

     

    Haven't they already had this in place for over a year?
    Projecting what? Government BS because they can't share the data they should already have.

     

    The fact that they are now adding supercapacitor banks says it all. Lithium ion sold them a bill of goods.
    14 Apr 2014, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    FYI, I think they got the order a couple years back. Govmint grants.

     

    VYCON delivers flywheel kinetic wayside energy storage substation (WESS) for LA Metro

     

    http://bit.ly/1eFe0V4
    14 Apr 2014, 12:17 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    Regarding the SEPTA energy storage--
    Anyone have rough numbers on how much more the lithium ion plus supercapacitors solution costs vs. a PbC that could in theory do the same job?
    14 Apr 2014, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1gxtv5p

     

    The link will take you to the most complete review I have found on the waystation energy storage system (WESS) projects under way. April 2013 publication, SEPTA project included. LA flywheel included.

     

    None are for freight rail.

     

    Axion is mentioned. Enjoy.
    14 Apr 2014, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I did a search for Axion and it didn't show any hits. I did see where their technology is mentioned under advanced PBA. Is that what you meant or was there some specific mention of Axion in some other round about way without directly using their name. For example, TG's company which is run in his New Castle!
    14 Apr 2014, 05:06 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, Axion Power, page 15, in the Table.
    14 Apr 2014, 05:10 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    VYCON. Private company. One instantly wonders in these savage days: What connection will turn up to yet another political appointee ne'e donor?
    14 Apr 2014, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, Thank You for the study and the guidance!
    14 Apr 2014, 05:37 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    "I just want to say one word to you. Just one word.

     

    No, fans of “The Graduate,” the word isn’t “plastics.”

     

    It’s “graphene.”

     

    ...

     

    The real kicker? Graphene is inexpensive."

     

    ======================...

     

    NY Times does Graphene:

     

    Bits - Business, Innovation, Technology, Society

     

    DISRUPTIONS
    Bend It, Charge It, Dunk It: Graphene, the Material of Tomorrow
    By NICK BILTON APRIL 13, 2014, 11:00 AM 49 Comments

     

    http://nyti.ms/1t0E5XV

     

    Haven't figured out who Nick Bilton is yet ... but he has 1074 author references on NY Times:

     

    http://nyti.ms/1t0E4Dx
    14 Apr 2014, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2435) | Send Message
     
    Linked in the article:

     

    Samsung’s graphene breakthrough could finally put the wonder material into real-world devices

     

    By Sebastian Anthony on April 7, 2014

     

    http://bit.ly/1t0FXzY

     

    "So far, it seems Samsung has used this new process of growing graphene to create some field-effect transistors (GFETs), which performed quite well, but that’s about it. Still, in a press release, Samsung pulls no punches: “This is one of the most significant breakthroughs in graphene research in history,” said the SAIT researchers"

     

    Go big, or go home :-)
    14 Apr 2014, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • Deamiter
    , contributor
    Comments (164) | Send Message
     
    The author waited until the second-to-last sentence to mention that, "This doesn’t mean that we’ll suddenly see computer chips made out of graphene instead of silicon, though — we still haven’t found a way of giving graphene a bandgap, which means it’s actually fairly useless as far as digital computing goes."

     

    It's an incredible discovery and I'm sure graphene will live up to the hype (within 10-20 years) but it's not going to change the world just yet.
    15 Apr 2014, 10:22 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1942) | Send Message
     
    A battery project cloaked in NDA secrecy? Maybe it's Axion Power.

     

    http://bit.ly/1eFfUF1

     

    I also haven't been able to find any additional information about the Guam bill that iindelco mentioned in the last concentrator.

     

    EDIT: http://bit.ly/1t0Q0VA

     

    The bill will be considered tomorrow.
    14 Apr 2014, 12:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Patrick, I found this re: Guam vote.

     

    SESSION Day Two: Debate on GPA Revenue Bond Bill Suspended, It Goes to "Committee on the Whole" Friday

     

    "Guam - Guam lawmakers this morning suspended discussion on Senator Ada's GPA revenue bond Bill #207 after some expressed concerns about GPA taking on further debt. They voted to go into the "Committee on the Whole" tomorrow, Friday, to learn more about the details of the measure."

     

    http://bit.ly/1t0YHiP
    14 Apr 2014, 01:10 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    There was a good segment on NPR this morning about the new wave of higher mileage cars making it's way to the U.S. (mainly via Europe). Here is the link in case you did not hear it.
    http://n.pr/1gx8Fjf
    14 Apr 2014, 02:27 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    absolutely, I'll get right to it. "....just in case [we] did not hear it ...." hehehe, ngs, thank you sooooo much, now i get it, where your intolerance is coming from, the elitism and dismissiveness of your recent "don't try to convince him!" enjoinder .... one can only chuckle and wonder at your presumption that allllll must want to hear whatever NPR is saying about whatever "Europe" is sending us. Europe? For God's sake, man, have you no dignity?

     

    Dude, the Ford Fusion Hybrid gets 47 EPA, a top-selling car for years. My son's Sonata Blue Drive is getting him 51 ACTUAL. Sweet ride. Neither from Europe. Neither sucking high-priced hard-to-find diesel or belching particulates.

     

    I know, no impulse control, probably going to get deleted, yada-yada-yada...
    14 Apr 2014, 04:41 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    @Edmund. I simply thought it was interesting that some publicity is shining on some of the new stop/start, hybrid, and diesel technologies. I guess that makes me elitist. I don't think there is any argument that these technologies are more widely adopted in Europe, mainly driven by the high price of gas. Best of luck with your investment.
    14 Apr 2014, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    You guessed wrong, but that's not why I reply.

     

    The article/interview shines a light on absolutely nothing of the sort - the entire point of the article, to use the word liberally, hahaha- I crack myself up - seems to be the multiply-repeated myth that Europeans have been enjoying something (not the double-treble cost of fuel, I imagine) "for years and years" that only now are [insert silent dummy] Americans waking up to.

     

    Wake up, @slacker; we've had as good or better here. Meanwhile, your fellow elitists from NPR are "screeching" around in an $65000 - $105000 Audi A7 getting "an impressive 30 miles per gallon for its class". C'mon, man, take the ribbin' like a gentleman.
    14 Apr 2014, 06:25 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    Chill
    14 Apr 2014, 07:18 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (289) | Send Message
     
    Or a government subsidized Tesla.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:17 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    @Edmund, thank you for your insightful and thoughtful analysis.
    15 Apr 2014, 08:49 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    np, ngs.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:13 AM Reply Like
  • Deamiter
    , contributor
    Comments (164) | Send Message
     
    Thanks nogoodslacker. I've been routinely disappointed whenever a car I might consider buying in diesel (not at all hard to find) is sold in Europe but not released here. We ARE seeing many of the mileage improvements that they've had for much longer, but it's a remarkably slow process!

     

    After just buying a new kid-mobile (van) for the wife, I am compelled to add a quick whine about the insanity of franchise dealerships -- it's long past time to do away with laws requiring that manufacturers give dealers permanent local monopolies...

     

    And back on topic, I can't wait to get a car with Axion Power Inside (tm)!
    15 Apr 2014, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    I love NPR and support their reporters with donations. I drive a 10 year old Honda Civic when I'm not biking or using public transportation. I know other NPR supporters but none of them drives an Audi or other luxury vehicle. The NPR listeners I know are urban lower middle class types generally. Teachers and social workers more than anything else in my experience. I recommend NPR news for the quality and breadth of the journalism.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    D Lane. I guess we are both tree-hugging elitists.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:28 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1782) | Send Message
     
    D Lane,
    I've got you beat. My Honda Civic is 13 years old. And yes, I am a sustainer.
    15 Apr 2014, 04:03 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (289) | Send Message
     
    Who's driving the Teslas?
    15 Apr 2014, 04:38 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    13 years is about the longest I've been able to keep a vehicle. The salt they use in the region does not treat the vehicles kindly.
    15 Apr 2014, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    Y'all go right ahead and "Circle up!". Not one iota of technical information in the NPR article proffered. My analysis was spot on. The article was a worthless and not-so-subtle anti-American 'let's raise taxes and force them alllll to buy European' piece. First it's "I love NPR" and "I'm routinely disappointed". And now I have to hear y'all brag about how old y'all's JAPANESE cars are?

     

    Cmon, man! I was chillin', but this is too perfect an opportunity to have a bit more fun.
    15 Apr 2014, 04:57 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    By the way, I'm commuting 80 miles a day in a 1997 Ford Mustang V-6 getting 23 mpg at 79 mph in salty NJ and she LOOKS and RIDES like NEW. NEVER one iota of trouble.
    15 Apr 2014, 05:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, hard to imagine if they slop around salt the way they do in Rochester NY. The last two years of my 13 year experience was jacking the vehicle up by the cross arms because the standard points on the unibody would not support the vehicle.

     

    I don't think your Ford's were that much better than GM's when it came to corrosion protection. At least from what I've seen on the road here.
    15 Apr 2014, 05:37 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, wasn't saying they were, wasn't saying they weren't. Just presenting facts for which I would gladly provide photo evidence. Though it's raining now and my dog has me rolling on the floor laughing at her antics after our walk.
    15 Apr 2014, 05:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, No photo required. You mentioned salty NJ and I just wanted to point out there are different levels of SS. Also, very hard to keep a car for very long here as a result of the long snowy winters that make the salt torture a more prolonged event generally. All the cars I've junked had fine mechanics left under the hood but the balance was an ugly mess.
    15 Apr 2014, 06:01 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    What can I say? Try a Ford. Like hybrid tech? Try a Ford. Like NPR? Then maybe you're more suited to the Audi A7 they're drooling over in ngs's article. I'm no pretender. I don't put on airs. I'm a tree-hugger, as I've said here multiple times in the past, I'm sure. But I'm no tree-hugging elitist, ok?, I wouldn't say something stupid like that. Now I'm going back to chillin'. Unless someone likes to poke the bear. heh-heh. Go Axion! Go Green Bear!
    15 Apr 2014, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • blauschuh
    , contributor
    Comments (342) | Send Message
     
    47 mpg... gotta call BS on that.
    http://aol.it/1jJ5yZh

     

    Here's around a hundred Fusions that are getting less than 40mpg
    http://bit.ly/1jJ5yZj

     

    Sonata Blue Drive eh?
    Only 13 listed on fuelly.com so the sample size is small... they are lucky to see mid to upper 30's
    http://bit.ly/1jJ5AQU
    15 Apr 2014, 08:34 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    My son is getting 51 with his Blue, blau - his first tank was 38, but he says he "figured out how to drive" it.

     

    If you can't, best I not suggest why.

     

    As for Fusions, they are listed at 47mpg, never said anything other. I suspect their performance would be similar, dependent on the intelligence of the driver.

     

    As for your "call", hey, I get it, if something doesn't fit with your world view, you just label it BS. Whatever. C'est la vie.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:01 PM Reply Like
  • blauschuh
    , contributor
    Comments (342) | Send Message
     
    Didn't realize links to actual data was me stating my "world view".

     

    Have fun doing 50 in the slow lane...
    15 Apr 2014, 09:21 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    ii, regarding salt corrosion, this Civic is holding up much better than the 1987 hatchback I had. Had to give that one up because the floor was ready to give way. Something about the quality of the steel or the corrosion barrier is better now. Like you, I live in the Great Lakes salt zone (rust belt).
    15 Apr 2014, 09:30 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1782) | Send Message
     
    Edmund,
    You'll have to forgive my ignorance. I was trying to catch up on about 300 posts since I went on vacation last week to celebrate my daughter's birthday. I never saw the comment you made above about the NPR article or European vehicles. For the record, my first car was a Ford Maverick. I drove it until my dad was afraid the engine was going to fall out due to all the rust in the mountings. From there it was a Ford Taurus, then a Chevy Nova, and then a Honda Accord. All were used cars that a drove until they fell apart or got in an accident and the insurance company totaled them. I bought the Civic in 2001, and it is the first and only new car i have ever purchased. I looked at all the competition at the time and there wasn't a US car that was made better for the price. When my wife's '97 Civic finally dies we will probably be getting a minivan to replace it. If there's a decent US minivan to compete with a Honda Odyssey or a Mazda 5, then I'll consider it. As for my Civic, when it finally dies, my next car will be a hybrid. Whether it's a Toyota or a Ford...time will tell.
    All that said, I'm still an NPR sustainer. ;-)
    15 Apr 2014, 10:53 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    The big problem is that drivers drive their cars at full tilt and slam on the brakes to stop or slow down. They expect the advertised mpg but they do not come close to driving in a manner to obtain the advertised mpg and then complain.
    15 Apr 2014, 10:59 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    "As for Fusions, they are listed at 47mpg, never said anything other. "

     

    2014 Ford Fusion is EPA rated for 22 city/ 34 highway. 2014 Ford Fusion HYBRID is rated 47 city/47 highway.
    16 Apr 2014, 12:17 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    D Lane, understood. I've never had a structural problem at that level because after certain other levels of impending repair like brake lines, fuel lines etc., well it's just not worth it when you're busy and alas getting older. Working on a car in the rust belt gets very expensive if you don't maintain channels to reasonable relationships.
    16 Apr 2014, 12:36 AM Reply Like
  • Milo2
    , contributor
    Comments (43) | Send Message
     
    Ha ha EM, go get'm :)

     

    D Lane, NGS, I think he was referring to NPR reporters and employees as being elitist. But maybe I'm wrong.

     

    I find NPR to be a one sided biased organization almost totally liberal in it's content and delivery. I hate it that tax dollars are used to subsidize it. The governing body should require equal time for a more conservative voice.

     

    Am I allowed to post this? I know it's got nothing to do with Axion or batteries.

     

    Just felt the need.

     

    Oh yea, I've got a 11 year old VW Passat with 180k miles. Still going strong. Gets 28mpg on the road and 23 in town.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:32 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    Milo2, maybe you will rest easier knowing that my public radio station (Michigan Radio) is only 6% funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (federal government). Its 63% supported by listeners (members) and 22% comes from corporate sponsors.

     

    http://bit.ly/1kyjciO
    16 Apr 2014, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    Certainly I don't want tax dollars going to radio stations of any sort - that's a time-worn recipe for a lot of evil; surely it's absolutely no wonder that those radio stations so supported (in any measure) then become spoke-puppets for ever-higher taxes.

     

    If you read the NPR offering by NGS, you will find nothing of technical value. Instead, in support of the point of the article, there are several mentions of the value of taxes and regulations and high-priced gasoline in helping control the unruly common man - the consumer who "wants his cake and to eat it too". (The nerve of that guy)

     

    Look up the individuals involved: Skorupski is a Booz Allen lobbyist (they don't tell you that) and Gott is upper management at IHS Global Insight (busy "advancing the world") and a consultant for the auto industry (esp VW) and for government, how convenient; no doubt in my mind he spends time lobbying for laws that favor VW diesel technology. Helping the State pick the winners, in other words.

     

    I'm sure they weren't at the Consumer Reports testing site in CONNECTICUT to see the C-Max being tested - and who do think invited the NPR puppet to take a ride in a "luxurious A7"?
    16 Apr 2014, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    My but you are one bitter and angry conspiracy theorist. They have meds for that.
    16 Apr 2014, 02:14 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    not at all - I'm the sweetest guy you'll ever meet. But I get you, you need to be dismissive; it's the backbone (and the tell) of the self-appointed elitist.
    16 Apr 2014, 03:10 PM Reply Like
  • Milo2
    , contributor
    Comments (43) | Send Message
     
    Again EM, very well stated.

     

    D Lane, I'm glad it is only 6%, but 6% is too much. 0% is what it should be. I would love a National Public Radio that was representative of all views. Imagine a healthy debate on AGW er, I mean Climate Change where the opposing view, er oh I mean "deniers" were allowed equal time.

     

    NGS, There is nothing conspiratorial about facts, and there was no anger, (maybe a dose of sarcasm/cynicism) in EM's comment. But then again, labeling is the final resort of the left when confronted with actual facts.

     

    I'll let it lie now.
    17 Apr 2014, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    Milo, the fact that you think climate change "deniers" deserve equal time given the overwhelming body of evidence that AGW is real, tells me all I need to know about your opinion. (BTW, I happen to be an earth scientist who has done climate research in the past and have followed the topic closely for 20 years, so I know of what I speak).

     

    I only answer because you addressed me directly. I won't comment further as this is off topic and APH has advised to knock off the OT arguments. Thanks for checking in.
    17 Apr 2014, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3166) | Send Message
     
    HTL, do you think we're headed towards a battle for 15 cents soon?
    14 Apr 2014, 03:53 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (10770) | Send Message
     
    Mr I: Until we hear something from New Castle, $0.14xx is on my radar as a potential add.
    14 Apr 2014, 07:16 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    MrI: Yes. It's got an origin and two touches where it provided support, one on goo rebound volume.

     

    How long and strong it might be is nothing I want to guess at because we've transitioned to seeing very aggressive behavior cxonsistently recently from WABR, CSTI (not quite as often), NITE, ATDF (as usual) and ARCA.

     

    Yesterday's post includes trading breakdown by time and there was no "late-day weakness", it was "all day weakness".

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    15 Apr 2014, 08:44 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3166) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, guys.

     

    Well, just broke below 15 cents on decent volume, and it's only early in the trading day. Wonder where the bottom is.
    15 Apr 2014, 10:56 AM Reply Like
  • Sohkubo
    , contributor
    Comments (98) | Send Message
     
    I must be an official Axionista now: my position is officially an unrealised loss.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:00 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    This thing can turn quickly. Today looks like a good day to be a buyer.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    Greentech Media:
    A failed battery technology in the auto sector (too hot, too heavy, too rigid a form factor) might well be perfect for the home energy storage market...with an addressable end market of 2 billion backyards.

     

    http://bit.ly/1eEIo1U
    14 Apr 2014, 09:43 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    Solar power so cheap and *reliable* it puts the oil sheikhs out of business. The boogie man of "energy price deflation" in a world where 5 billion do not have washing machines or automobaubles.

     

    I hear the honking of politically correct wild geese.

     

    And what's good for the proper goose is good for the proper gander.
    14 Apr 2014, 10:10 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I'm still laughing. You have those old "stupid" slack jawed utility guys that have a business model, while not perfect, having served far too little inhabitants of the world for a pretty long time. I can fully understand why some of "we'uns" want more reliability during certain events to keep our power. What the heck do you think is going to happen in a pretty unusual event when we have all kinds of people that thought they would be immune to such things and they hear, "Sorry can't help ya".

     

    The utilities have their primary assets well hardened. Your solar panels and other assets are wonderful during MOST events. If they go down hard they will become your worst nightmare.
    14 Apr 2014, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    I'm continually amazed by the guys who think they'll be independent of their utility with solar panels and a 10 kWh battery. It may work most days but what about those times when the weather is gloomy for a couple days in a row and the solar panels aren't making enough juice to power the house or recharge the batteries? Will they expect the utility to stand by at the ready without demanding reasonable compensation for maintaining the connections and capacity to provide the standby service?
    15 Apr 2014, 05:45 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    Guys, a great article on the subject is here:
    http://bit.ly/1jHxHje

     

    I am pulling for the grid vision as articulated here by the Rocky Mountain Institute: Utilities evolving.

     

    "Lena Hansen, an energy specialist with the nonprofit Rocky Mountain Institute, suggests that it might be possible to fix that problem at its root. Her organization has long advocated for distributed energy, and with it “a regulatory framework that rewards what we as a society want from our utilities: electricity that’s affordable, carbon-free and innovative.” Utilities could evolve rather than disintegrate, continuing to serve the “elderly and less fortunate” as ably as they manage supplies from rooftop solar owners. Everyone could stay integrated on the same “thriving, interconnected electricity grid,” Hansen says.

     

    And the grid has its advantages. “It helps bring costs down; it creates a reliable system in general for all customers.” Rooftop solar has grid benefits, too – it’s clean, efficient and relatively predictable. “So the key question before us,” Hansen says, “is, ‘How do we revise the pricing structures to encourage more solar on the grid? How do we make sure that everyone is paying their fair share, but everyone is also being paid for what they’re providing?’ ” The goals is to keep incentives strong on both sides: For people like Flint and Jones to generate clean solar power for the utility; for the utility to survive, and maintain a robust system for the customers who depend on them."
    15 Apr 2014, 08:01 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I listened to this PodCast where they are interviewing Scott Sklar about all things energy efficiency/green energy and he made one point that made me smile as it relates to robustness of solar panels. His comments were that they have learned to focus a little less on maximizing the angle of the solar panel for peak efficiency relative to the sun's path and to keep the panels mounted in a parallel plane with the roof line and to also be mindful of how the panel and mounting bracets might gather organic waste like leaves.

     

    It is one of the things I thought about when I reviewed one of the Bysolar installs. In one of the residential installs they had mounted the solar panels on a well worn 15 year 3 tab shingle roof. That means that long before the panels have served their useful life the owners will have to pay someone to remove all the panels and put them up again just to replace the roof. A pretty expensive proposition for a system that takes a long long time to pay for itself if that were even to be the case before the round trip installation of the panels AGAIN.

     

    http://bit.ly/1jHZhNq
    15 Apr 2014, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3166) | Send Message
     
    Good pt, iinde. Seems like a solution to lower labor and material costs would be to eliminate redundancy by having the solar panels be shingles. I think Dow or some other biggie had those.

     

    Heck, I'd take a solar power front lawn, too, as I'd rather vacuum than fertilize, weed and mow.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:43 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I, Yes I saw the panels for roofing article some time ago and it has been discussed here. I think, just like with larger scale energy storage, justifying an expenditure because it can perform more than one task makes it an easier sell. Of course the reasons have to be real.

     

    Don't know why more people in arid areas don't just stick with rock gardens and various cacti. Lawn mowing can only be rationalized as an acceptable sport for the wealthy and paid workers. Or livestock.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Hi ii,
    As a desert rat I can tell you that while not having the hassle of a lawn would be nice, having a lawn cuts down on reflected heat and keeps the house cooler.

     

    An underground (or mostly) house with rock gardens and cacti would solve the problem and save a lot of energy (good luck meeting earthquake code).
    15 Apr 2014, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the perspective Stilldazed. I have to believe that w/ today's insulation and appropriate air flow in conjunction w/ things like mass and color selection, there are things you can do above ground to reduce active cooling/heating quite a bit.
    15 Apr 2014, 01:53 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2112) | Send Message
     
    Hi ii,
    Believe it or not, the technology hasn't changed much in a couple hundred years.

     

    The best way to keep the heat away from the house is to put a veranda (porch) around the sunny sides of the house. Stick built houses with 6 inch thick walls that are well insulated helps on cold days and in the mornings of a hot day, but once wood and insulation heat up it takes a long time to radiate the heat away.

     

    I use a swamp cooler instead of a/c except for the August dog days and save a ton and have fresh air in the house to boot. Fortunately our area cools at night into the 70-80 degree range, not like Phoenix AZ where it is 100 degrees at midnight.

     

    BTW, it is not unusual for my attic with an attic fan to reach 140-150 degrees in summer.
    15 Apr 2014, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Stilldazed, Been to the region many times but never spent any time in residential construction. Shading does seem to make the most sense. Evaporation as well if you can get the water. Seems a waste too dump it on a lawn though.

     

    Anyway, Thanks for the feedback!
    15 Apr 2014, 03:20 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    Your backyard battery storage unit along with solar power is limited by your ability to be a stand along power producer and consumer. I can see someone splitting their electricity consumption to on-line and self-contained. The energy companies can not give customers power at retail and buy back power at retail because of the cost of transmission., so there is a cost to have on-line power as a standby or supplement. As the saying goes, there is no free lunch.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:16 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    Her basic premise has no basis in fact. Roof top solar is no a reliable source of power because to two factors; one, there is no power generated at night and two, not all days are equal in power generation due to potential cloud cover. To cover these contingencies, there would have to be a power cube units available to match all the power generated by solar in day time and night time when "the sun does not shine".

     

    This reminds me of the environmentalist in Washington State putting an measure on the ballet which passed that stated that hydroelectric was not a renewable source of electric power. The only reason they stated the ballet measure this way is that Washington State generates most of its electrical power from hydroelectric. They wanted solar and wind power to be 15% of power generation by a date certain weather it made any sense or not. It does not make any sense and is not obtainable because hydropower does not need to be supplemented in most years. The whole thing is fishy if you know what I mean.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:43 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    iinde, You are describing what we have in Sun City, AZ and many areas around Phoenix. We have no lawns. Our yards are covered with rock except where have planted trees or shrubs. These we water with carefully monitored sprinkler systems. I am currently reworking my sprinkler system to match the type of vegetation involved. One line for citrus trees, one line for medium water requirement plants, and a third line for desert plants.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:53 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Larry, makes sense.
    16 Apr 2014, 08:53 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2962) | Send Message
     
    As a roofer friend says, "There are two kinds of roofs: those that leak, and that will."
    16 Apr 2014, 09:57 AM Reply Like
  • axion-nl
    , contributor
    Comments (183) | Send Message
     
    ten days has past since TG announced Axion will present some meaningfull sales within 44 days. So the pressure and expectations are growing :) I expect some good news any day now!
    15 Apr 2014, 02:43 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    I don't expect to hear anything before the 44-day update call. Is that a reasonable possibility?
    15 Apr 2014, 08:58 AM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    It is in alignment with our history!
    15 Apr 2014, 09:04 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    axion-nl, Actually, it's 14 days since the CC, but who's counting. Although he did not really say he would "present some meaningful sales," he did raise the expectation in my mind that there would be some progress worth talking about. I'm not expecting anything to be announce before then, but it would be a nice surprise if it is. My feeling is that he will come through this time, based simply on my hunch that he could not be so dumb as to raise expectations yet again only to fail.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:06 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, Don't forget that if he stretches it to the Q1 cc he has once again failed to meet his last promise that it will not be 6 months to meaningful sales. Or was that 2 promises? Not good IMO. He's not exactly batting 1000 in his sales predictions.
    15 Apr 2014, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    "He's not exactly batting 1000 in his sales predictions. "

     

    :-) Let's give credit where credit is due, iinde. He is not batting zero either. TG (11/15/13), "... certainly significant means significant and it’s not just a creep-up in sales." Yes siree! No creep up in sales appears on the mark.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, Well we did have the Bysolar sale which was a solid single as well. Alas, games are rarely won with only a solid singles. Especially with so many innings between sonic cracks on the ole' stick.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:31 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    "... we did have the Bysolar sale which was a solid single "
    Indeed we did .. prior to November 15, 2013.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13565) | Send Message
     
    I would say that the Bysolar project is more of a bunt...

     

    And too bad there was no runner on base to advance.

     

    A larger pc sale would be what we are all watching for, short term, and perhaps it could even move the Bysolar runner over to 2nd base.

     

    Notice none of us are talking much about the prospect of a TG "home run" anymore.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    "Notice none of us are talking much about the prospect of a TG "home run" anymore."

     

    Reminds me of a story about someone crying wolf.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:36 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    As the old saying goes;
    What we have here is a lack of communication!

     

    Along with a lack of trust I would add!
    15 Apr 2014, 12:39 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13565) | Send Message
     
    "Trust but verify".

     

    I'll let you know when TG gets "verified". So far all the evidence is piling up under the "not" column.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (289) | Send Message
     
    "Not" but perhaps "not yet."
    15 Apr 2014, 04:41 PM Reply Like
  • anthlj
    , contributor
    Comments (228) | Send Message
     
    Not a particular fan of the dreary Mr. G, but if you review the last call transcript, I don't think the CEO directly announced the promise of sales within 44 days. Now this may be simply a case of a 'once bitten twice shy' CEO, but those expecting booked sales *may* be disappointed once more. In any event, we should adhere to what was said, not what we'd like to have been said:

     

    And last question thank you, the update on the substantial sales issue that we've been following for the last several months.

     

    Thomas Granville
    Well I am going to mention here in my closing remarks than it’s a short 44 days to the next call. And we’re looking forward to that call because we’re looking forward to update everybody on how that is going and progress that we’re making. Would I love to have seven or eight of these projects under lock and key? Absolutely. Walk before we run for sure, is this a Norfolk Southern automotive scenario where it’s going to take forever to test, no that’s not where we are.

     

    ...The next call will be in a short 44 days from now. We’re happy with that timeframe because it will allow us to update you on the fast moving market initiatives that we have embarked upon.
    15 Apr 2014, 07:34 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    I would agree that TG was not stating unequivocally that in 44 days he would be reporting the signing of a contract, but your ellipsis obscures the very next question:

     

    Unidentified Analyst : Has there been anything that has interfered with your initial expectation of substantial sales between then and now or is it just variety business delays?
    TG: It’s more the latter than the former. There have been a couple of hiccups in there such as funding for the owner, such as approval from government agencies that have just dragged down forever.

     

    I am not disagreeing with anything you have said, but his answer does sound somewhat more hopeful than not that booked sales are imminent within the 44-day timeframe.
    15 Apr 2014, 08:56 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, about those TG responses. Based on past performance, there is not really much to say other than buyer beware.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:17 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    Stef,

     

    Do you think TG is the always running late type who means well? We all have office mates like that.

     

    Or is he a guy who pre-plans his mis-actions? I sure hope we aren't told what we want to hear. I'd rather hear the true state of our sales pipeline.
    15 Apr 2014, 01:58 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Bazoo - From what I understand of TG, he is a very smart, methodical, and calculated individual.
    15 Apr 2014, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • Alphameister
    , contributor
    Comments (1428) | Send Message
     
    They activate only one teleconference line at a time so they don't have to hear the audience laughter at such lines as "our fast-moving market initiatives."
    15 Apr 2014, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13565) | Send Message
     
    Alpha: LOL, it IS a "fast-moving market", but their initiatives...

     

    Not so much.
    15 Apr 2014, 03:45 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    cue audience laughter: BWAAAAAA_HAHAHAHAHAHAA...
    geez, ed, that sounded like a Vampire, didn't it?!?!
    15 Apr 2014, 06:37 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    I've just published an instablog with a lightly edited version of the update Jay Bowman sent to the ePower stockholders last night.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    15 Apr 2014, 07:37 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    Thanks JP!
    15 Apr 2014, 08:02 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1942) | Send Message
     
    Thank-you JP! I sincerely appreciate all the pro-bono work you do for Axion Power.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:03 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    ePower is a very small company with huge ambition that needs the exposure as much if not more than Axion. The synergies between the two companies are very strong but my primary goal in talking about ePower is to further its business and enhance my fundraising efforts.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:08 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1942) | Send Message
     
    John, could you comment on whether, similar to NSC thinking about having a "battery car" between two diesel locos, ePower has considered putting some or all of the batteries in the trailer itself. Obviously this would only be feasible for operators that use their own trailers, but you could presumably get longer grade-assists with more batteries, no? Obviously not a priority, but I would think the batteries wouldn't take up any more space at the front of a trailer than a typical refrigeration unit.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:15 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    We've considered the possibility and think that mounting the batteries on a trailer would be easy, but for now our focus has remain fixed on very narrow goals. Using more batteries to provide extra boost on long grades where other tractors rely on the transmission is inefficient. The only place we even care about battery boost is modest grades that other tractors take at 65 mph.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:29 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1942) | Send Message
     
    What metrics would adding more batteries improve?

     

    Towing capacity?
    15 Apr 2014, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    More batteries is usually a bad plan because every pound of weight you add to a tractor subtracts a pound from the cargo hauling capacity.

     

    Current weight limits regulate the gross combined vehicle weight including tractor, trailer and cargo. Lighter weight tractors and trailers increase available cargo weight. Heavier tractors and trailers have the opposite effect.

     

    Several states have changed their rules to bump the weight limits for tractors that use more hardware to improve fuel efficiency, but the rule changes are not uniform.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    Maybe it is time for the trucking industry to copy the railroads. Put on power pack units where needed and drop them off when not needed. I can see a whole new business. Whereas the railroads are operating on their own tracks, trucking is operating on public highways. If the trucking industry does the mapping to determine where they would need additional power, they could have contractors with supplemental power units available to get over passes.
    16 Apr 2014, 12:07 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2962) | Send Message
     
    I think it is highly unlikely that a cat 8 cab/trailer combo would put batteries in the trailers.

     

    1) The cabs and trailers are often on very different duty cycles

     

    2) there are gross vehicle weight limits that could be troublesome

     

    3) the efficiencies of larger batteries are penalized by the additional weight

     

    4) very challenging engineering and ownership issues

     

    There may some very specialized, small niche where it might be effective, but I cannot think of any.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:08 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    Rick, it makes sense to put batteries on the trailer with independent owner operators who stay with their own trailer. I have even given some thought to using the forward tandem axle of the trailer to assist after converted to a drive axle. But you are right, drop and hook is what we do the most of...
    16 Apr 2014, 02:08 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1578) | Send Message
     
    Very nice to see both Rick and Tim sharing their viewpoints again!
    16 Apr 2014, 09:17 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    Yes!
    16 Apr 2014, 09:30 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    From the CC:
    TG: "We have developed a model from our data and from hourly data from the PJM network that provides a value proposition for future PowerCube owners. We developed this model on what we call a standalone basis, in other words [a] cube that is not integrated with renewable like wind or solar. Based on our standalone model of modified usage, advantageous recharge and advantageous maintenance times and *PbC sweet spot electronics*, we are able to fill an excellent internal rate of return using only the revenue from frequency regulation.

     

    This model does not place [any] value on system storage support or any use [of] power support in an emergency situation. It only values the dollars that are returned to the owner from PJM. The value proposition only grows [larger] when solar is added to the equation and the storage system becomes eligible for solar tax credit. We have a begun the launch of our model with a 500kw up, 500kw down system in conjunction with a solar farm in New Jersey. We continue to market this application and found a particularly competitive "sweet spot" using a 2.5 megawatt building block. Our customers’ base for the first time now includes investor based entities that are beginning to understand the value propositions of frequency regulation.

     

    1st Unidentified Analyst: Is the 2.5, you mentioned the 2.5 [MW] block and I haven’t heard that before. Is that the ideal size for a frequency regulation project?
    TG: Yes, you haven’t heard that before because we haven’t really experimented with it until the last few months. For the larger projects and by larger projects I am talking about double figure megawatts, that’s a building block that we feel we can be at it for a lot of reasons that I won’t get into, but there are break points and that’s a "sweet spot". {What's a break point? Is that some financial term?}

     

    ----------------------...
    2nd Unidentified Analyst: Good morning, question again about the PowerCube, you mentioned a "sweet spot at 2.5 megawatts". Can you explain why that is the sweet spot?
    TG: No. {I about choked when he said "No" so summarily} I certainly could but I don’t want to reveal too much other than certain things dove tail [at that] level and our economies of scale that include electronics and some other things that I would rather not get into because of the competitive advantage. {some other things? for what other "things" could they be accruing the benefits of economy of scale? mega-racking systems? And which component of the required electronics might be benefited? Do inverters come in 2.5 MW size?}

     

    Did anyone here offer an explanation or details of any sort as to what this "sweet spot" might be about?

     

    Finally, is the solar farm TG mentions one and the same with the BySolar food-industry customer sale? And/Or the "investor-based entities"?
    15 Apr 2014, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2962) | Send Message
     
    I thought the 2.5 MW "sweet spot" was simply the capacity of a standard shipping container at maximum weight. Anybody else remember? I am feeling too lazy to calculate out the numbers.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    Since 2.5 MW is a power rating and not a storage, I had assumed it had something to do with the ratings of the Princeton Power inverters that they use. Then again, since the battery power rating is proportional to the storage, it is probably the combination of container size, inverter rating, and maybe a few other things.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:31 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I can't imagine that much PbC in one trailer from a volume standpoint ignoring weight for the moment. I was thinking the sweet spot might have more to do w/ the sizing of the inverters in conjunction with full containers of batteries. So the footprint would be a electronics trailer that supports x number of storage battery trailers.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:34 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    ii, Assuming a PbC battery has about 500wh of storage and can handle a 5C discharge rate, that only adds up to about 1,000 batteries for a 2.5 MW power rating. That should easily fit in a standard 40' shipping container with room for racking and inverters.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:40 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    I think 2.5 MW would require several battery containers and a shared control electronics container.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    NGS, Oh, OK. I was thinking MWh. So in this case it would only be a shipping container as you both suggest.

     

    Why is this any different than what we've seen them suggest for the PC for some time now?
    16 Apr 2014, 10:45 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1215) | Send Message
     
    It is possible that TG meant MWh, but he did say MW more than once.
    16 Apr 2014, 10:55 AM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (620) | Send Message
     
    My impression was it had to do with issues like matching up the optimum size of various components of the system. Capacity of the shipping container could be that critical component but I don't think that was directly stated.
    16 Apr 2014, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    I would think there are some differences in how you would maximize the value of the offering based on the target market. The highest value market would be with a larger inverter and charging/discharging at the highest rate possible for frequency regulation. This recognizing that the market utilizes the storage for both the ability to source and sink power with the latter being one of the PbC's biggest strengths.
    16 Apr 2014, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    From the transcript.
    "Good morning, question again about the PowerCube, you mentioned a sweet spot at 2.5 megawatts. Can you explain why that is the sweet spot?
    Thomas Granville

     

    No. I certainly could but I don’t want to reveal too much other than certain things dove tail level and our economies of scale that include electronics and some other things that I would rather not get into because of the competitive advantage."

     

    What those 'other things' are is my question.
    16 Apr 2014, 02:17 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    A 40-foot container is 2400 - 2700 cu ft, (depending on whether it is of the "high cube" sort or not). I figure about 1/3 of the volume is for access or other components. That leaves 1600-1800 cu ft for batteries. If there's two inches clearance between every battery on every side to account for racking, wiring, etc, that would mean the 30H battery (13 x 6.8 x 9.5) needs 14 * 7.8 x 10.5/1728 = 0.6635 cu ft and the container would have room for 2400-2700 batteries.
    OTOH, if each battery weighs 73 lbs, that's 175,200 - 197,100 lbs. Unfortunately, the maximum payload weight of a shipping container is listed at 58,000 lbs. Not sure that applies, but if it does, that's only 800 batteries and nothing else.
    16 Apr 2014, 02:19 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    You will have to move the container as well so a high cube will require a drop deck trailer and you get over 80k and permits and the cost to transport start getting real expensive... FYI...
    16 Apr 2014, 02:22 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Froggey, I think TG is delirious if he thinks he has some information that gives him advantage based on size that extends beyond some performance vs price characteristics unique to the PbC battery.
    16 Apr 2014, 02:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Tim, So if you wanted to do this would it make more sense to dress out the cube and leave out enough batteries to keep the load under the 80k load restriction, adding the remaining batteries back in on site?
    16 Apr 2014, 03:17 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    IIndelco
    Having thought it over a few times.
    I've no idea what he was talking about... but he clearly had something in mind.
    16 Apr 2014, 07:26 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Froggey, All I can think of is that Axion thinks they have an advantage due to the more balanced cycling rate capability vs pure chemical storage batteries due to it's capacitive component. Not as good as capacitors but they are far more expensive unless you are constantly cycling them up and down over very short durations. I can't think of any other advantage that people with far more resources than Axion has would not be able to figure out as well.
    16 Apr 2014, 07:39 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    IIndelco
    I considered cooling at first but I couldn't see how mentioning that would ruin a competitive advantage....unless perhaps he thinks they might lower their margin thus spoiling Axion's price advantage. (and Axion's greater margins with a lower price point?)

     

    As with solar panels and everyone cutting their own throat for market share.
    That seems weak, but plausible.
    16 Apr 2014, 08:01 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    "PbC Sweet Spot Electronics", continued:
    http://bit.ly/1hP8GV0;cat=;51
    These are TG comments which have been linked before, but for simplicity I'll put a link here.

     

    "Granville continued, "There are certain federal and state tax credits that can apply to energy storage assets like our PowerCube when the asset is combined with solar. So our recent initiatives, such as the purchase order we received for a '500kw up and 500kw down' PowerCube system in New Jersey, take advantage of three separate revenue streams from the frequency regulation market - demand response compensation, pay for performance and solar tax credits. The PowerCube value proposition provides an owner with a very attractive investment with a high Internal Rate of Return. Our Axion Model seeks to maximize IRR's and return all investment dollars in the first five years~, (a One MW system for example, annually grosses $250,000. ~ just from frequency regulation). In addition, the PowerCube provides storage for the solar project while also providing project power in emergency situations," Granville concluded."

     

    While TG does not mention "sweet spot PbC electronic" here as he did in the CC, one can see where the phrase might be applicable. I would like to understand better the meaning of "A 500 kW up, 500 kW down system", a phrase which TG uses in both sweet spots re' "the sweet spot".

     

    Is this the amount of energy the system is easily able to cycle or does this have something to do with the sinusoidal nature of electronics or frequency regulation?
    17 Apr 2014, 08:32 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4363) | Send Message
     
    FWIW, I interpreted the "500Kwup, 500 kw down" reference as indicating the electronics were capable of both supplying power to the grid and discontinuing draw from the grid (acting both in front of, and behind, the meter). This was noted earlier.
    17 Apr 2014, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    I just saw a Figure 5 on page 18 in the PJM-Ultrabattery report that iindelco links in the next Concentrator which seems to me a graphic representation of this up/down description. I have never really understood the whole "in front of, and behind, the meter", to be honest.

     

    I'll repeat his link here for simplicity for those who follow: http://1.usa.gov/1qRpQTs - and thanks again to iindelco and all those who have tried to explain this.
    17 Apr 2014, 09:36 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    Ed,

     

    I really only take it to mean whether the storage asset is on the customer or utility side. Behind the meter is on the customer side and in front of the meter is on the utility side ... I could be wrong though, as I have been many times before and will be again ...
    18 Apr 2014, 12:40 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco, if it were me, i would build out in 20' containers from the factory and not rely on field installations. One container w/electorinics (inverter/switching) and the rest full of batteries built and TESTED at the factory.

     

    Looading at the factory on flat level pavment with a stationary overhead crane is one thing, unloading at the project site with a shale base and equipment that is likely to be too small.

     

    20' containers are modular, easy to manuver, stakable and you don't have to have the big boom to put it where it needs to be... just my 2 cents worth...
    18 Apr 2014, 08:52 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (2722) | Send Message
     
    Ecoulet/EastPenn went with the 20' container for their "expansion strings", each weighing "about 50,000 lbs". But only batteries inside; the inverters etc for power control were all housed in a separate building.
    19 Apr 2014, 07:48 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18515) | Send Message
     
    04/14/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from the blog (up now).
    # Trds: 64, MinTrSz: 500, MaxTrSz: 25000, Vol: 449480, AvTrSz: 7023
    Min. Pr: 0.1593, Max Pr: 0.1720, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1641
    # Buys, Shares: 28 194680, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1662
    # Sells, Shares: 36 254800, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1624
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:1.31 (43.31% "buys"), DlyShts 115500 (25.70%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 45.33%

     

    ARCA was in pre-market again on both sides with a 5K $0.131 bid and a 4K $0.249 offer. They exited the buy side at 10:23. Their first move came at 10:33, 10 minutes after they exited their bid. Similar behavior has been noted many times recently. Anyway ... As with many prior days, there was heavy and somewhat aggressive competition from the usual WABR, NITE and ATDF market-makers. CSTI also became more active and aggressive. Unlike prior days, ARCA did not pop in and out of the market all day long. They basically hung in there are slugged it out with the other aggressively selling folks.

     

    This resulted in a constant price weakening throughout the day, seen in the trading breakdown by time.

     

    I didn't see NITE's 200K offer at $0.21 in pre-market, nor during the day. That doesn't mean it wasn't there ...

     

    The average of the lowest 20 VWAPs times 80% today is $0.0979 vs. $0.0954, $0.0929, $0.0904, $0.0884, $0.0865, $0.0848, $0.0831, $0.0819 and $0.0816 on prior days. 80% of today's VWAP is $0.1313 vs. $0.1351, $0.1425, $0.1485, $0.1397, $0.1468, $0.1505, $0.1522, $0.1399 and $0.1332 on prior days. These are potential prices for the next tranche of shares to the PIPErs.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved -0.44%, -5.96%, -2.87%, -48.71% and 25.22% respectively. Price spread today was 7.97% vs. 14.31%, 8.57% 5.71%, 9.40%, 7.78%, 11.30%, 14.22%, 5.88% and 19.76% on prior days.

     

    The larger trades (>= 15K) occurred on 7 of the 64 trades, 10.94%. These 132,000 shares were 29.37% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1650. 4 of these ...

     

    The other 57 trades, 89.06% of the day's trades, traded 317,480 shares, 70.63% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1637. 24 trades, ...

     

    We have the second consecutive day of lower highs, lows, VWAPs and closes. Yesterday was on rising volume while today's is on reduced volume. Let's hope volume remains low and we don't head into a nose dive on rising volume.

     

    I had mentioned the possibility of some support at $0.16, but said I didn't think it would hold up well because it looked weak to me and was just a bottom of a brief sideways trading channel. Yesterday's low was $0.16 on ~32K, two trades at 15:56. Check today's breakdown by price and you'll see twelve trades at that price for 73.9K, all but one a sell.

     

    You'll also see ~47% of day's volume in the $0.16-$0.1621 range but with only ~20% buys. This tells us two things of note. About 43.7K shares were taken from the offers around that range, not a sign of strength, and ~174K+ were sold into the bids in that range, also not a sign of strength. If you now check the breakdown by time you see that no strength was exhibited as the slide down towards the lows of the day was almost totally uninterrupted.

     

    We closed at the second lowest price of the day, $0.16.

     

    I'm thinking there's enough selling to exhaust support at $0.16, based on what I see ATM. Unless the sellers just pack up and go home ...

     

    $0.15 still seems the best nearby potential support point. We'll have to keep our eyes peeled as we approach though – there's a lot of reasons to suspect that it might have difficulty holding there, some of which are based on traditional TA stuff.

     

    All the usual is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    15 Apr 2014, 08:55 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1942) | Send Message
     
    I checked out the Yahoo finance comment blog for Axion Power, and there sure are some ignorant people out there.

     

    Admitting my own lack of knowledge, could someone please explain how one goes about shorting AXPW? I cannot find any options for it using my Vanguard trading platform, but there has always been the implication that there are people "holding shares short".
    15 Apr 2014, 09:20 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    It's extremely hard to short a low-priced stock like Axion because there's no easy way to borrow shares.

     

    Federal Reserve rules subdivide every brokerage account into two classes - a cash account and a margin account. Brokerage firms can loan funds against securities in your margin account and they can also loan your margin account securities to potential short sellers. Stocks like Axion that can only be deposited in a cash account cannot serve as collateral for margin loans and the brokers can't loan them to potential short sellers.

     

    Until the price rises to a point where Axion is included in the Fed's list of marginable securities, the only way to short the stock is to find a holder who's willing to loan shares, and that's usually very difficult.
    15 Apr 2014, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • DaveT
    , contributor
    Comments (209) | Send Message
     
    When I asked IB about loans out of my margin account there they refined the statement to say that they can forbidden to loan the stocks if the cash balance is positive.
    But when the balance is negative they can lend whatever they want, irrespective of, say, any limit sells.
    Whether they got it right is another matter, but the respondent seemed convincing.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    Some brokers do it and some don't. Most people won't bother with shorting a micro-cap.

     

    http://bit.ly/Rmrznv
    15 Apr 2014, 02:03 PM Reply Like
  • CoryM
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    I guess fear is in control of this stock now. Goes back to what I think was JPs point of bottom feeders waiting for the stock to drop before buying. If investors buy at the ask and price rises then greed takes control. I myself don't have any clout (or money) to reverse the trend. I don't mean to put anyone on the spot, but I believe there are those who could say "I am buying" or "I have bought" and the result would be a change in sentiment causing the share price to ascend. Is it artificial...I don't know. All I know is this is dropping fast and I see no other reason but fear. It would be of great benefit if someone with faith in the company stepped in and bought some shares.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2660) | Send Message
     
    CoryM -

     

    A change in sentiment will come when TG's words ring true and Axion starts to capitalize on even a little sliver of all the potential that is regularly bandied about.

     

    Otherwise, I cannot and will not agree that the low price is somehow our fault. Complete hogwash in my honest opinion, but everyone is entitled to their own opinion.
    15 Apr 2014, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2248) | Send Message
     
    I agree completely with you Stefan. I was carefully watching the increase in price considering it somewhat an attempt by some to ride the price up prior to the next CC, but when the price turned down the momentum was over and people started getting off the train. I did, however, admire the bravery of the buyers at .9 who cashed in at .18.

     

    In my own case, I believe the upcoming 4th quarter capital raise is hanging over this stock like a guillotine. Genuine significant sales had better occur before then or stockholders are going to experience another bloodbath.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:10 PM Reply Like
  • CoryM
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    Stephen--

     

    I didn't mean to imply the drop in price is "our" fault...I would guess only 10% of my buys were at ask. If not for this board, I would not be aware of the Axionista base that has undoubtedly supported this stock against past heavy sellers which has been amazing.

     

    My only opinion on the matter is if sales are "imminent" then no worries, but if sales are "possible" then it would be nice if insiders were buying without fear of orange jump suits. I am just looking for another possible catalyst besides talk...whether it be by battery sales or influential stock purchases.
    15 Apr 2014, 12:40 PM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (328) | Send Message
     
    I agree as well Stefan. While this is a wonderful discussion board, no one is beholden to any one as to stock price or sentiment. No one is even required to write honestly, although Our Host seems to take good care of instances where this happens.

     

    IMO, the market is a beautiful thing, despite the manipulations which we know take place. Our money is our own as are our buy/sell decisions.

     

    15 Apr 2014, 01:03 PM Reply Like
  • Alphameister
    , contributor
    Comments (1428) | Send Message
     
    The verse changes slightly between conference calls, but the refrain is always the same. Or to put it in a Peanuts context, Lucy remains a b*tch and Charlie Brown always ends up on his butt.
    15 Apr 2014, 10:22 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    I bought yesterday! I guess I should have waited!

     

    I believe the ongoing delays being reported by ePower is also throwing more concern into the mix as many here were hoping a year ago that ePower would be in full swing by this time. This reality of the debugging process is just supporting the fact that TG will again miss any projection of sales in the near term. Since TG has listed ePower as one of two of the hoped for near term growth sectors that puts more pressure on the other sector that NDA's have completed hid progress from view.

     

    I am hopeful TG will come through with a sales announcement but the way I read his statement he only suggests that he will update us in 44 days. He has been updating us every conference call but not with the data this story needs to support stock price increase. With the time erosion until the next raise continuing to take its toll I don't see any reason for upside potential until a definite sales announcement of significant value takes place. I did not obtain any warm fuzzy feelings from TG in regards to that happening.

     

    "Would I love to have seven or eight of these projects under lock and key? Absolutely. Walk before we run for sure,"

     

    I am hoping Axion can get up off the knees and stop crawling so we can start to walk. At least hold our head a little higher!
    15 Apr 2014, 12:08 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    RB,

     

    Wow; EPower sentiment drives Axion now (somewhat). We really are scraping then. In my mind Epower is many years away from being a significant source of revenues. Their own survival will likely be more difficult than Axion's.
    15 Apr 2014, 02:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Bazooooka, Nobody should really be questioning Axion's survival. It's about investor ROI only IMO.
    15 Apr 2014, 02:17 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    ii,

     

    I agree with you in the short term. But money has to come from somewhere to pay TG and company? At what point do raises become problematic? Especially if the macro picture weakens as many are predicting.
    15 Apr 2014, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    baz,

     

    I agree with you in regards to ePower being years away from significant revenues but per TG:

     

    "There are several initiatives in the vehicle market sector that we continue to pursue but we have been pointing our assets more and more toward a specific application and that is the heavy-duty Class 8 truck. ePower Engine Systems..."

     

    Maybe I am misinterpreting this remark but to me it appears that TG is placing a higher value on ePower in regards to the motive application market which is one of two markets Axion is pursuing. The longer ePower delays it's launch the more pressure appears to be put on the other market potential in regards to revenue generation. Axion would probably be thrilled to announce any form of sales whether large or small at this stage so I am assuming they are applying more assets to ePower since they feel they are the closest in terms of a launch opportunity. Of course I could be wrong and Norfolk Southern could definitely launch prior to ePower but Axion probably does not need to apply more asserts towards the NS launch at this time. Along with this is the potential of other motive applications that are nearing a launch of their own but are covered up with NDA's.

     

    All I am suggesting is that as of right now ePower is getting quite a bit of the spot light and they are still not ready to launch. I can definitely tell you that if ePower came out tomorrow and said their OTR unit is completely debugged and going into service next Monday that would go along way to improving "my" sentiment towards Axion!
    15 Apr 2014, 02:35 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    Eaton sold over 6,000 hybrids in the three year period following launch. Their system doesn't even come close to offering a comparable value proposition for end users. It could take us a long time to build customer base. We could also find ourselves with a tiger by the tail.

     

    So far the best Cummins and Peterbilt have been able to do with an unlimited budget is a tractor that hauls 65,000 pounds on level ground and gets 10.7 mpg with every fuel efficiency enhancement known to man.

     

    We expect to come within 15% of that number using a 2002 vintage day cab chassis and a retrofit drivetrain.

     

    The mousetrap matters and we expect to have a pair of them rolling within a few weeks.
    15 Apr 2014, 02:44 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Bazooooka, the raises are already problematic. They will just dilute the old investors away if they need to. Thus the ROI concern. Could be someone else will carry the ball over the finish line.

     

    Another example of dilution. The US govmint and many others. Just a different currency.
    15 Apr 2014, 03:26 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (289) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Peterson,
    Well said.
    15 Apr 2014, 04:50 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    ii;

     

    At some point you can't even do "raises". I've seen it before with mining companies. Last year's PIPE shows that suitors are getting fewer and uglier.

     

    Can you imagine a scenario where nobody wants to give Axion money under "any" terms. That isn't at hand yet - but it is possible imho.
    15 Apr 2014, 05:21 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    JP,

     

    A 30B company can sell 10 a day. I hope you guys sell 10 before year's end. Also I'd love it if I have wildly underestimated your potential.
    15 Apr 2014, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    I plan to borrow a page from Tesla's playbook by taking reservations with refundable deposits. Since it will take a while to ramp up our conversion capacity, I can't think of a better way to show that demand is far greater than current capacity. I'll also be willing to bet that a couple hundred reservations with deposits at the ePower level will represent a clear planning path for Axion.
    15 Apr 2014, 05:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10254) | Send Message
     
    Bazooooka, Axions next raise might look structurally something like this at another price point if they don't get some giddy up soon.

     

    BTW, I consider Arista to be a big POS so please keep this in perspective.

     

    Arista Power, Inc. Announces $1.5 Million Financing

     

    http://yhoo.it/1jIPBCe
    15 Apr 2014, 05:51 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3633) | Send Message
     
    Yup,

     

    That's a junk placement for Arista indeed. However I did notice it wasn't a bottomless convertible and it only covers about half their S,G,n A which would be good if they can get sales by Summer's end.

     

    Point taken, I do hope Axion doesn't have to rattle the cup for a few months of salary like those guys are. But did note their salaries are about half the Axion brass and they have only burned about 27M to date.

     

    All in all Axion does smell better but I think you did a good job of showing where things "could" head. If we end up like them we will be below a nickle stock and that's almost as bad as an ROI of zero from my perspective.
    15 Apr 2014, 06:19 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (984) | Send Message
     
    The biggest reason I'm so interested to see ePower on the road is to prove to the world that the batteries are real and not just sales hype.

     

    While "we" may believe all the great things said about them, having a real truck running real loads with them and not catching on fire, will go a long way towards putting them on the radar of other potential buyers.
    15 Apr 2014, 08:12 PM Reply Like
  • Alphameister
    , contributor
    Comments (1428) | Send Message
     
    Would I love to have an effective CEO under lock and key, one who can deliver on his endless promises, absolutely!

     

    (Believing the technology is bigger than the CEO, I bought today also.)
    15 Apr 2014, 10:27 PM Reply Like
  • Bill Burtchaell
    , contributor
    Comments (413) | Send Message
     
    John, what exactly do you mean by "come within 15% of that number", does this mean that our proto will only achieve 85% of the efforts of Cummins and Peterbilt?
    16 Apr 2014, 02:16 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    Our Cummins engine has a fuel burn rate of 6.8 gph. If its hauling a truck at 64 mph it should have a fuel economy of 9.4 mpg. We think we've got enough power for 65,000 pounds at 64 mph and maybe a bit more, but we won't know for sure till the tractor is on the road and tested. Any way you cut it, 9.4 mpg on a 2002 or 2008 vintage chassis with a rebuilt drivetrain shows real well against 10.7 mpg using every gee whiz technology known to the industry. we don't feel any need to beat the big boys as long as we make a good showing and come with 15% or 20% of their best.
    16 Apr 2014, 03:23 PM Reply Like
  • Sohkubo
    , contributor
    Comments (98) | Send Message
     
    Completely understandable. If theoretically one did have the budget to use the best tech in the industry in an ePower drivetrain, would you expect the mpg be mind-blowingly better than anything out there, or does it quickly reach a point of diminishing returns? (Possibly a pointless and difficult speculation to make, just curious).
    16 Apr 2014, 03:53 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30636) | Send Message
     
    We know of several enhancements that would further improve fuel economy. Some are truck related like better aerodynamics, tag axles and low rolling resistance tires, and others are mechanical items like a permanent magnet generator, a better transmission and a drive motor that's better tuned to our needs.

     

    For now our primary concern is building a tractor that can do the required work at an attractive cost. When that job's done we'll be looking for ways to do the work better and cheaper.
    16 Apr 2014, 04:13 PM Reply Like
  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (405) | Send Message
     
    I bought today

     

    This is a long term story -

     

    That said I believe the pipers are still there and when they can move inventory at good mark ups they could care less of AXPW and its future. Moreover i think they move fast on sales when they see any price deteroration further driving prices lower

     

    I also believe TG will have positive news in the days ahead. How many days I do not know - but certainly by the end of June 2014 the story should be told. For TG - it must be told

     

    If one does not believe the foregoing do not take advantage of softening prices

     

    AXPW remains a technology company with significant prospects and adequate leadership to solve its problems and develop its markets

     

    It has been and continues to be on sale
    15 Apr 2014, 01:03 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1942) | Send Message
     
    Near-term pros:

     

    2.5 MW PowerCube "building block".

     

    NSC will be testing a working train within the next few months.

     

    Ongoing cons:

     

    Management is bush league.

     

    Undervalued market cap inhibits financing.
    15 Apr 2014, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1948) | Send Message
     
    PY,

     

    The answer to poor management is really within our hands: change the guys at the top! The idea that TG is somewhat "above average" given his record of fund raising/sales prediction is stunning to me.

     

    We might just find that the market is warming up to a company taking a different a strategy. I still think that all the Top Tier names we have been involved with/are involved with have found Axion rather than they other way around, and the reason they did is because Axion' s technology is ideal for certain applications, and this has IMHO nothing to do with TG's skill in attracting them. It would have been the same under any other leadership.

     

    Just my two cents.
    A
    15 Apr 2014, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    Patrick,
    Maybe the answer is not in the management of the company but in their maintenance of honesty about where they are.

     

    If you lie about where you are as a company, you can gain an edge on financing, if the those who supply the funds are less than diligent in doing their work. However, lower levels of due diligents will eventually come back to bit the lenders of funds.

     

    Undervalued market cap is only a single measure of a company's financial strength. If those who lend only rely on this measure, they will not be successful in the world of finance.
    16 Apr 2014, 12:31 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (2072) | Send Message
     
    Anyone know why fills take so long? I put an order in on the ask, and took a couple minutes to fill.
    15 Apr 2014, 01:43 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    I don't have an answer but will tell you I have the same experience.
    15 Apr 2014, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (328) | Send Message
     
    My guess, that nasty Vampire Squid and his cousins and their unfair advantages previously referenced on these pages.

     

    I have placed orders at the ask, with many more shares available than I was asking for (not AXPW however) and had it sit for ~15 minutes only to walk away up and not fill.

     

    I don't like it of course but accept it as something I cannot control. I still think the market is a beautiful thing, warts and all.

     

    One reference on the subject is linked below. I do not trade like this fellow but I like his writing and I think he explains the problem well and offers ways to circumvent the disadvantages to the retail trader.

     

    http://bit.ly/1jIogAg
    15 Apr 2014, 02:12 PM Reply Like