Axion Power Host's  Instablog

Axion Power Host
Send Message
Trying to learn stuff
Back To Axion Power Host's Instablog HomePage »

Instablogs are blogs which are instantly set up and networked within the Seeking Alpha community. Instablog posts are not selected, edited or screened by Seeking Alpha editors, in contrast to contributors' articles.

Comments (448)
Track new comments
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (385) | Send Message
     
    I'm taking this as an omen. For what? I'm not sure.
    27 Apr 2014, 06:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Isthisonebetter, I'm taking it as an "Oh Man", just missed it!
    27 Apr 2014, 07:14 PM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (846) | Send Message
     
    Third one's the charm.
    27 Apr 2014, 07:26 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    As most regulars know from my Concentrator comments and my Instablog's summarizing Jay Bowman's bi-monthly updates, we’ve made solid progress at ePower over the last six months. Since my last Instablog, Jay and the engineers from Cummins, Marathon and Unico have concluded that we have the drivetrain efficiency issues under control and the odd readings we've been getting arose from from communication bugs rather than performance problems. In other words, it looks like the drivetrain is doing everything it should be doing and the primary reason for our less than exciting fuel economy was that we were working the system too hard by running the drive motor too far out of its optimal torque band. Mercifully that’s a problem we know how to fix.

     

    We’ve recently changed the shift-points on the transmission to slow down the drive motor and bring it back to an optimal point on its torque curve. The last remaining steps will be:

     

    • Swapping out the gears in the differential to optimize the system for power and speed;
    • Replacing one of the two rear-end differentials with a tag axle to boost fuel economy by about 5%; and
    • Replacing the dual tire rear wheels with low rolling resistance “super-single” tires and wheels.

     

    Jay expects to have that work completed with a couple weeks and we've come to terms with an independent trucker who will begin hauling freight with the sleeper tractor as soon as Jay’s willing to turn over the keys. He took the tractor out for a couple hours on Wednesday and loves the way it drives.

     

    We still have to take the tractor to the trucker’s freight broker for an inspection, but we believe we can accumulate a couple weeks of real world fuel economy data before the end of May. While the bigger fleets we want to approach next will be skeptical of any data we generate, we believe a detailed report on an independent trucker's experience while hauling brokered loads on day-trip routes will be compelling.

     

    Jay is confident enough in the drivetrain that he went out and bought four more 2003 model year Sterling day cab tractors for the ePower demonstration fleet. A recent picture of our first day cab retrofit which is coming together nicely and should be road ready before the end of May is available here:

     

    http://bit.ly/QLHmvo

     

    While we’re delighted with the pace of our development progress, we are less happy with the pace of our financing activities. We’ve raised about a half-million and while experience tells me that we’re doing a good job of keeping ePower funded, we need to take things up a notch if we want to accelerate the schedule and make a credible approach to the industry.

     

    Last week the ePower board decided to change our offering structure from a sale of straight common stock to a sale of units, each consisting of a share of common stock and a five-year warrant. Concurrently our lead investor agreed to match the next $400,000. The offering is limited to accredited investors. Anybody who wants more information should contact me by PM or e-mail.
    27 Apr 2014, 08:14 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Aw man ... now all our mini-Gupplies that were going to push our PIPE-free AXPW through the roof are going to instead be investing in ePower ...

     

    we just can't catch a break :-)

     

    Good luck to all.

     

    And congrats on the progress!
    27 Apr 2014, 08:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Accredited investors must establish a million dollar net worth (excluding principal residence), an individual income of $200,000 per year or a joint income of $300,000 per year so the term "guppies" is not quite accurate.
    27 Apr 2014, 09:13 PM Reply Like
  • timzinski
    , contributor
    Comments (136) | Send Message
     
    JP>
    "Jay is confident enough in the drivetrain that he went out and bought four more 2003 model year Sterling day cab tractors for the ePower demonstration fleet."

     

    Does this mean ePower will be placing an order for PbC batteries for the 4 new trucks...soon?
    28 Apr 2014, 10:01 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    We're basically finished with the sleeper cab and should have the day cab on the road within a month. Once the first two tractors are in the hands of fleet owners we plan to build out our demonstration fleet as quickly as possible. The next four rebuilds are in the queue.
    28 Apr 2014, 10:04 AM Reply Like
  • CoryM
    , contributor
    Comments (79) | Send Message
     
    I don't understand the accounting difference between a purchase order versus an order/sale, but ePower does have a purchase order to cover it's next 10 trucks at 56 batteries each.

     

    http://bit.ly/1k3Uu6i
    28 Apr 2014, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Our purchase order is a contract to buy the batteries for a total of ten tractors. The order will not be included in Axion's sales until the batteries are shipped to us.
    28 Apr 2014, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the update, John.

     

    When you say "The next four rebuilds are in the queue," does that imply that ePower will be completing them in sequence, because they only have space and staff to work on one at a time? Or would they use the private investor's $400K mentioned recently to expand staffing and production?

     

    The photo's of the shop floor look like there should be space to work on more than one truck at a time.

     

    With the bugs worked out in the first two prototypes, can the software and hardware be standardized for parallel production at this point, or will it still be tweaking one at a time for optimal efficiency?
    28 Apr 2014, 10:32 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    We don't have any meaningful space limits in Florence and could probably handle up to 12 tractors at a time without having people tripping over each other. Our staff, on the other hand, is small and we still have some work to do before we'll be able to offer kits to customers. It's not rocket science by any means, but optimizing the packaging of our mounting hardware and electronics, outsourcing fabrication tasks on common components and building our staff will take some money, time and effort.
    28 Apr 2014, 10:47 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Does ePower have any plans to obtain ISO 9001 certification, or perhaps adopt some other quality management program? I would imagine a lot of potential buyers and fleet operators require some sort of quality certification.
    28 Apr 2014, 01:53 PM Reply Like
  • 23808
    , contributor
    Comments (87) | Send Message
     
    Nogoodslacker

     

    If you work for a big corporation, you need to cross the t and dot i. Then, I see the need to explain to your boss why you go with e-power if there is no ISO 9001?

     

    However, if you are the fleet operator, you can make your own decision because you are the boss. I doubt they will need ISO 9001.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:23 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    23808: And not to mention the expense and long-duration required to achieve certification. Then keeping records and periodic re-certification is needed.

     

    And it generally only benefits for exporting and/or "qualification" with big corporations that really get into managing supply-chain issues.

     

    That's what I've been told though - no personal experience.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 02:35 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    23808, Many big fleet operators are themselves ISO 9001 certified. I imagine those would want some assurance of quality. It's hard to imagine that something with as many critical safety features as a big rig truck could go to market without some sort of documented quality program. I imagine this is on the to-do list as they would want to perfect their process before trying to get it certified.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:37 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    ISO 9001 is one of those things a company like ePower has to grow its way into. I'm sure it will become a goal in due course, but not while you can count the employees on the fingers of one hand, or for that matter two.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:44 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3105) | Send Message
     
    JP is right about "employees on one hand". Getting ISO 9001 certification typically takes a team bigger than all your fingers and toes.

     

    ISO 9001 certification does not prove much. The popular line is you can get cement life jackets ISO certified as long as you fully document the cement.
    28 Apr 2014, 03:08 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    I don't necessarily put a lot of stock in ISO 9001 certification, but that is not to say that quality management programs are not important.

     

    Anyway, I'm not trying to be critical of ePower. I know the process needs to be perfected before they need to worry about documenting performance and safety objectives. Just trying to get a sense of their quality management goals.
    28 Apr 2014, 03:33 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Amen! the resources to attain and maintain ISO certification are pretty significant. And You're right Rick, All it means is you document and do what you say you're doing.

     

    I'll put the life jacket on and try to swim. He drown. Check! See you for the next audit.

     

    Not to minimize the intent but it is expensive.
    28 Apr 2014, 03:34 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Don't denigrate cement life jackets, there's a precedence suggesting they could be very effective if properly designed.

     

    http://bit.ly/1itnjxr

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (3174) | Send Message
     
    John
    As you've stated that the sleeper was basically the original idea and is the first on out of the block.
    I was surprised that Jay bought 4 day cabs. Just a good deal? or more demand? or something else you can talk about?
    28 Apr 2014, 03:46 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Jay started working with a sleeper cab because it has lots of space on the chassis for mounting components. A day cab chassis is a much tighter fit and Jay didn't want to take on that challenge until he was certain the drivetrain would work as he expected.

     

    Due to the way trucks are loaded and used, our series hybrid drivetrain is a better fit for the day cab segment that typically hauls lighter loads. While we want to be able to haul 80,000 pounds, we think our sweet spot will be in the 55,000 to 70,000 pound range, which is good enough for 80% of the US market and an even larger share of the European market.

     

    The bottom line is we think the day cab segment will be a better fit and easier to penetrate. Besides, we got a very good price on the tractors.
    28 Apr 2014, 04:03 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Concrete canoes are a long academic tradition and can be quite sophisticated:
    http://bit.ly/1m2nQEB
    28 Apr 2014, 04:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    SMaturin, You beat me to it. My sons college, to be alma mater next month, participates. Good stuff!
    28 Apr 2014, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    Also an "order" is not binding right? Was Axion required to put out that PR a year back?

     

    And if conditions force EPower to postpone delivery into late 2014 would Axion need to put out another PR (since that order makes up a significant portion of expected PbC revenues)?

     

    I only ask since I have been told that PRs normally occur when "anticipated" revenues are less than a year away or sooner.
    28 Apr 2014, 05:14 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    While Axion's recognition of the underlying sale depends on the delivery date, a purchase order is a binding contract when signed. Given the modest size of last year's purchase order (~$200,000) I'd classify it as a voluntary rather than a mandatory disclosure. As long as ePower accepts delivery at a commercially reasonable rate in the ordinary course of its business there's no rule or reason for a retraction, clarification or other follow-up.

     

    It's not at all unusual to see a company like Axion announce a multi-year supply agreement with a customer that encompasses a known quantity of goods with an uncertain delivery schedule.
    28 Apr 2014, 05:31 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    I see. If an uncertain delivery schedule can mean year(s) out before the majority balance of the agreement is booked then I'm not so sure how newsworthy 200k really is/was from Axion investor standpoint.
    28 Apr 2014, 05:43 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    As a matter of likely impact on top line revenue, the ePower contract probably wasn't news.

     

    As a unequivocal public affirmation of confidence in the PbC technology and its suitability for one of the most demanding fuel economy applications imaginable, it was big news.

     

    Our original schedule has slipped a little because it took longer to integrate the Cummins engine into our system than we expected. That slippage, however, is measured in months, not years and there's a lot going on behind the scenes that I'm not ready to talk about yet.

     

    The next important news should arrive in mid-May when we have done enough testing to give us a good feel for the sleeper cab's fuel economy. The more important news should arrive in late-May or early-June when our first independent trucker reports his experience hauling freight with our sleeper cab.
    28 Apr 2014, 05:56 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    Agreed it's news for EPower. But from my Axionista standpoint - I wish I could go back in time and reallocate to the Epower investment instead (since you guys will likely overtake Axion revenues in the near term and might make up the lion's share of PbC sales).

     

    And yes I hope I'm wrong on this but Axion moves so slowly now that the stock is starving and I suspect any rainy day funds from lurkers might make it into EPower before Axion does meaningful volume again. Or maybe it's just me that hears a clock ticking and other's are perfectly content with the pace of everything (news, revenue, placements, etc).
    28 Apr 2014, 06:02 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Can't wait to see those two data sets. Good luck to the team.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:14 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    ePower can only sell securities to millionaires and the vast majority of Axionistas and lurkers are not in that category. I see no potential harm to Axion from ePower's fundraising activities. If I did I wouldn't mention them in this forum.

     

    More importantly, every order ePower takes for a tractor or retrofit kit represents a $20,000 addition to Axion's backlog. While I'd love to overtake Axion's revenues, I don't see that happening any time soon.

     

    You're a victim of battered stockholder syndrome after watching Axion's stock take a beating every day for the last four years. That experience has distorted your outlook on the future and made you think of ePower as a threat instead of seeing it as a customer that's absolutely reliant on your company.

     

    There are no losers in the Axion – ePower business relationship.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:17 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    JP,

     

    I don't see EPower as a threat at all. I'm just realistic that your new team shows more "potential" than the Axion team which keeps changing except for TG. Heck, I have lamented before that I wish you were still a part of Axion but you have reminded us that if you had been, then we wouldn't get the info we've been accustomed too.

     

    As far as "accredited"; I'm well aware of what it means and I think you're wrong if you really don't think Epower investors and Axionistas have tons of overlap. Especially when it comes to the type of people who can move the needle for either company.

     

    Also I don't worry too much if EPower finds million(s) that otherwise would channel to Axion since Axion is a derivative of EPower's success.

     

    And yes I'm "battered" as I suspect you are too. Nobody likes to hold a stock that falls nearly 90% from when they first learned of it.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I didn't say there was no overlap because there most certainly is, but the class of money ePower is likely to attract is not the class of money that will move Axion's stock higher. Right now everybody is feeling battered and I'm no exception. Mercifully the experience is something I've lived through often enough that I accept it as a natural part of the process and draw a huge amount of comfort from mountains of data that tell me ZRPSOD is imminent.

     

    ePower will be able to offer a compelling product to the trucking industry because Axion has developed an extraordinary battery. Axion will have a product regardless of what happens at ePower. The inverse is not true for ePower. In this equation, Axion is the independent variable while ePower is not.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:39 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    JP,

     

    You would know better than me but it still strikes me as unlikely that no other battery on earth could help EPower achieve its goals. That being said; I'm glad it is the PbC that Mr. Bowman went with.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:46 PM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    I imagine ePower's financing will go a lot easier once AXPW is out of the woods. Those who know about ePower know about Axion. I forwarded ePower docs but it's hard to press the issue until some success is seen in the other. Of course by then everybody wants in.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:58 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    If the PbC hadn't worked the last options would have been lithium-titanates or supercapacitors, both of which are incredibly expensive in the quantities we'd need.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:59 PM Reply Like
  • Milo2
    , contributor
    Comments (43) | Send Message
     
    Man is that green!
    28 Apr 2014, 09:39 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3105) | Send Message
     
    I've been in concrete sailboats. Canoes apparently are active, too. But lifejackets.... :)
    29 Apr 2014, 03:02 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Rick: I think they be quite effective because they are so heavy you can't stand up in the canoe and fall overboard! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    29 Apr 2014, 03:13 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Rick, To your point yesterday. ;-)

     

    http://bit.ly/1kcxFNN
    29 Apr 2014, 03:23 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "... quite effective because they are so heavy you can't stand up in the canoe and fall overboard!"

     

    All a matter of perspective .. and indirection. I'm sure more than one person feels their lives were saved by fitting someone else with a concrete life jacket.
    29 Apr 2014, 05:19 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I always thought they used concrete galoshes.
    29 Apr 2014, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1mVBQnB
    29 Apr 2014, 05:50 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    D-Inv: LoL! I hadn't thought of that angle! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    30 Apr 2014, 06:56 AM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (724) | Send Message
     
    First of thnaks a whole bunch for the update.

     

    "• Replacing the dual tire rear wheels with low rolling resistance “super-single” tires and wheels."

     

    I thought y'all weren't going to do that to show a clear proof of fuel economy by the drive train alone.

     

    "Last week the ePower board decided to change our offering structure from a sale of straight common stock to a sale of units, each consisting of a share of common stock and a five-year warrant. Concurrently our lead investor agreed to match the next $400,000. The offering is limited to accredited investors. Anybody who wants more information should contact me by PM or e-mail."

     

    Does that mean you are not going on Shark Tank? :-(
    30 Apr 2014, 04:39 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    A first tier freight hauler that's based in our area gave us a tick-list of specifications they wanted to see in a tractor with an alternative drivetrain. While we were confident that our sleeper cab with 8 x 10 drive and steel wheels would satisfy all their requirements except for weight, being too heavy could give them an easy reason to say no. Since we'll only get one chance to make a great first impression, we decided to shave a thousand pounds by going to a single drive axel and super-single tires.

     

    Since I think we're weeks away from introducing a new apex predator, I wouldn't want to bruise any shark egos.
    30 Apr 2014, 04:55 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    JP -

     

    Will attempting to meet the specifications be something that you can do concurrently with collecting MPG data and putting a truck in another fleet's hands?
    30 Apr 2014, 05:00 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    With the tag axle and super-single tires we think the sleeper cab will meet every standard on their tick list with plenty of room to spare.
    30 Apr 2014, 05:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    For those like me not familiar with "super single" tires here is a brief article concerning their advantages.

     

    Making More Money Using Super Single Tires on Trucks and Trailers

     

    http://bit.ly/R4sVmf
    30 Apr 2014, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Here is a pretty good article about some of the advantages and disadvantages of converting to super single on class 8 trucks.
    http://bit.ly/R4uCQy

     

    They don't say the cost, though. One of the trucking forums I looked at guestimated $1700 per axle for wheels and tires, but I guess you could sell the old wheels to get some of that back.
    30 Apr 2014, 05:35 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (439) | Send Message
     
    JP -->> That is great news about the progress that "eTeam ePower" has been able to make on the project.

     

    How did the independent operator come to know about ePower?

     

    Once the sleeper unit gets out on the road packing freight, it will be generating news for the grapevine. It would seem likely that the industry trade publications will soon see the ePower vehicles as a great story to do a writeup on.
    27 Apr 2014, 08:44 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The trucker is a semi-retired local guy from Florence who's been close friends with our Kentucky counsel for decades. Since we have to assume that there will be breakdowns and other problems, it was important to find somebody who understands that he's driving an experiment and is willing to put up with any unexpected problems.
    27 Apr 2014, 09:09 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (973) | Send Message
     
    A documentary on ePower and American Ingenuity would be great to see.
    27 Apr 2014, 09:32 PM Reply Like
  • LawBoost
    , contributor
    Comments (11) | Send Message
     
    Really?!?
    27 Apr 2014, 09:21 PM Reply Like
  • LawBoost
    , contributor
    Comments (11) | Send Message
     
    Uno? Really?!?
    27 Apr 2014, 09:21 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (111) | Send Message
     
    JP, I wish you at ePower complete success with the first independent trial.

     

    We will be on the road for three days heading back to Washington State, the winter season in Arizona is over for another year.
    27 Apr 2014, 11:36 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Since I grew up in Phoenix and did my undergraduate work at ASU I understand why you might find summers in Washington more pleasant.
    28 Apr 2014, 04:21 AM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (439) | Send Message
     
    The ALABC, from 2010 to 2012, conducted more research into additives for lead acid batteries. The ALABC released light duty summaries for some of these projects.

     

    The ALABC contracted out one research project to Exide in Spain. The project's time frame was two years. The results are not really what the carbon additive industry would want to hear.

     

    Ten new varieties of carbon additives were tested, and five different test cells were constructed, presumably from these ten new varieties of carbon additives. The test results demonstrated that "carbon additives are not a universal remedy for lead-acid batteries." These additives were of no benefit under a high discharge rate at low temperatures (-18 C or 0 F), and in some instances, they reduced the battery's performance under those conditions.

     

    But, again, the basic difficulty that one is met with in designing a battery that uses carbon additives is that there is still no consensus on the fundamentals of how carbon additives work when added to the negative. Such means that the questions of which carbons to use as additives and in what quantities do not have clear and predictable answers.

     

    At this point in time, there is agreement that only so much carbon can be added to the negative, after which the performance of the battery is reduced. Generally, the amounts added are less than ten percent. Exide's recent patent documents are for a carbon/graphite mix that is as high as 15 percent. The current research indicates that after a certain point, adding any more carbon additive will be harmful to the battery's performance.

     

    Another ALABC project was conducted on the use of naturally occurring polymers as additives for lead acid batteries. Testing appears to be continuing in this area.

     

    In one particular ALABC project, Exide in Spain was contracted to work with activated carbon or graphite as additives. The goal of this particular project was to "increase the performance of VRLA batteries to the point of becoming a real alternative to NiMH and Li-ion ones in hybrid electric vehicle applications." It was decided that in order to accomplish this goal, it would be necessary to increase the specific surace area of the negative, thereby creating a supercapacitor effect within the battery. Increasing the surface area is generally beneficial, but if it is taken too far it can lead to gassing problems, especially at the higher voltages.
    28 Apr 2014, 03:43 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    The "original" patents underlying today's PbC were held by the "Russians", original assignee C and T Co., Inc. with inventors with names like Yuri M. Volfkovich and Pavel A. Shmatko. Lots of other Russians got involved in the years ahead. Another Russian, just a guess, by name Markovsky, was President of Tamboril. John was pretty brave to be hanging around with all these Russians.

     

    http://bit.ly/1isA7UY

     

    Anyway, here's one of the foundational patents:

     

    Electric double layer capacitor (ca. 2001, C and T Co.)
    US 6466429 B1 (http://bit.ly/1isA8Z6)
    Here's the first claim:
    1. An electric double layer capacitor comprising: a polarizable electrode made of a carbon material....
    and
    The capacitor of claim 1, wherein the portion of the lead in the polarizable electrode [ed., this is the activated carbon electrode] ranges from about 0.03 to about 3% by weight.

     

    Now the Russians also had important patents (also obtained by Axion) on methods of activating the charcoal (http://bit.ly/1isA9fo) such that it would adsorb the necessary charge carriers, as well as methods of fabricating the electrode (http://bit.ly/1isA9fq)

     

    As I mentioned in APC 325, the litigation seems to have come to an end in Dec. 2005. In the next year or so, E.Buiell et al filed many patents, including this one:

     

    Negative electrode for hybrid energy storage device (ca. 2006, Axion)
    US 7998616 B2 (http://bit.ly/1isA8bi)
    which contains this claim:
    The negative electrode of claim 1, wherein the sheet comprises:
    5-95 wt % activated carbon, 5-95 wt % lead, and 5-20 wt % conductive carbon.

     

    I did not realize that Axion had made such broad claims with respect to the composition of the activated carbon electrode. Interesting. This presents one obvious means by which they can adjust the "energy/power split".

     

    The point being, the activated carbon itself is not tweaked. The method of activating the carbon is one of the very first contributions by the Russians - I still don't know who does this activation process (alkali treatment, followed by acid treatment, followed by ammonia cleaning, etc), but I suspect it is Axion as the Kuraray import documents (IIRC) don't seem to indicate anything other than the sale of a carbon they offer for sale to anyone.
    28 Apr 2014, 09:37 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1k3IQbC

     

    Edit: Axion is using the YP-50F per the import records.
    28 Apr 2014, 09:43 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I bought the Tamboril shell from three private equity funds that were ultimately controlled by the Hunt family. Those funds invested a couple million in Markovsky's cigar company and ultimately forced it into Chapter 11. While Markovsky was a non-issue when I opened negotiations with the Hunt family, it was a challenging time because their lawyer was preoccupied with negotiating Superbowl contracts for the KC Chiefs.

     

    The Russians that ran C and T were another story. They had several brilliant electrochemists who did great theoretical work. The challenge was to get them working on practical design and engineering issues instead of focusing on theory.
    28 Apr 2014, 09:51 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    Axion imports the YP-50F, but can you confirm that they are not modifying it?

     

    One of the foundational patents they obtained from Schmatko and Volkovich was for the modification of activated charcoal. This was also the first patent "updated" or "refiled" after Axion took over:
    http://bit.ly/1isFinL

     

    "The goal of the present invention is to obtain activated carbon having high electric capacity and stable electric characteristics."

     

    "This goal is achieved by the method proposed, comprising treatment of the activated carbon with 1.0-10.0% alkali solution, followed by treatment with 0.2-10.0% nitric acid, washing and drying. After drying, the carbon can be annealed at 135-950° C. in inert or slightly oxidative medium or at 135-350° C. in air, steam or exhaust gases atmosphere. In addition, washing of the carbon following the acid treatment can be done using ammonia solution up to pH 4-10, and the annealing after drying is applied in inert or exhaust gases atmosphere up to 135-950° C."
    28 Apr 2014, 10:09 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I have never received any information concerning any added processing Axion might be doing to the activated carbon they acquired from Kuraray prior to the sheeting process.
    28 Apr 2014, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    (OTCQB:AXPW) Notice of effectiveness, but for what?

     

    http://bit.ly/1isfyb6

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 06:24 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    I am puzzled also, but assume it has something to do with PIPE shares.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:26 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    There were three registration statements for the PIPE shares. On April 17th, Axion filed a post-effective amendment for the first of these registration statements. That post-effective amendment cleared the SEC today.

     

    Now that the first post-effective amendment has cleared the SEC, I expect to see post-effective amendments for the other two registration statements in short order.

     

    The amendments are necessary because SEC rules require evergreen resale registration statements to be updated at least once a year to include the most recent audited financial statements.

     

    This is nothing new. It's simply an update of the old.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:58 AM Reply Like
  • kevin lemm
    , contributor
    Comments (164) | Send Message
     
    Seriously Mr. Petersen, and the regular cast of experts that share information here you continually keep my investment in axion based on facts, I can't thank you enough.
    28 Apr 2014, 07:20 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    >HTL " Notice of effectiveness, but for what?"

     

    I think we can safely rule out shareholder communication :-)
    28 Apr 2014, 04:43 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    WTB: LoL! Wish I'd thought of that! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Tiny Sensor Monitors Batteries on Start-Stop Cars

     

    "This isn't the first battery sensor to offer such capabilities, but Freescale says it is about 50% smaller than its predecessors, draws about 20% less power, and costs 30-40% less. The product, which the company calls the first to integrate a microcontroller, A/D converter, and CAN protocol chip into a single package, measures about 7 mm x 7 mm. It is scheduled to reach mass production at the end of this year."

     

    http://ubm.io/1itveoz
    28 Apr 2014, 07:40 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1693) | Send Message
     
    "a recent blog post by Navigant Research points out that APUs offer the potential of saving 500 million gallons of diesel fuel each year.

     

    Some APUs use small two-cylinder diesel generators to produce electricty; others store energy in glass-mat lead-acid batteries that power air conditioners.

     

    The Navigant analysis suggests that there may now be 300,000 APUs on the road, perhaps one quarter of them all-electric.

     

    And the savings from those units during 2013, it calculates, are roughly half a billion gallons of diesel fuel over the alternative of running the main diesel engines used to move trucks weighing tens of thousands of pounds for hours at a time.

     

    APUs likely aren't something that most car owners think about, unless they happen to fuel up at highway rest stops close enough to the truck parking area that they hear engines running at idle or generators in operation.

     

    It all goes to point out, once more, that improving the efficiency of very low-efficiency engines--especially those that cover 80,000 miles or more a year, as do long-haul trucks--can save a ferocious amount of fuel compared to improving the gas mileage of already-efficient personal cars."

     

    Source:http://bit.ly/1isGTtU
    28 Apr 2014, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    One of my favorite trucking statistics is that the industry burns 28 BILLION gallons of diesel fuel per year in the US alone. That works out to an average of over 10,000 gallons per truck per year. For the long-haul segment the fuel burn is 20,000 to 35,000 gallons per truck per year. Trucking is one of the few industries on the planet where making a difference really can make a difference.
    28 Apr 2014, 10:29 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1693) | Send Message
     
    Which is why I spend time trying to become an expert on efficiency advances for heavy-duty trucking. Especially hybridization.
    28 Apr 2014, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    One of my favorite stats, in this regard, showed that you saved much more fuel (when driving 10,000 miles) by improving a truck's mpg from 10 to 20 mpg as you do improving a car's mpg from 33 to 50 mpg.

     

    http://bit.ly/R0AyKw
    30 Apr 2014, 02:22 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    One may ask why are you posting the following here?
    Answer: To understand the mind of the Axion investor.

     

    Today, I declare VOCEL: Victory Over the Check Engine Light.

     

    So, my 1998 Volvo S90 with 120k miles is a beauty. Shiny body, smooth ride, and runs great. That being said, it has an intermittent hesitation from a stop and the check engine light keeps showing "System too rich". Multiple smoke tests ensured all vacuum leaks were plugged. Compression test shows engine has good compression. Sluggish MAF and O2 sensors replaced. New Air intake, PCV system , idle air control valve, and secondary air control valve. Tested good function of fuel pressure regulator, ignition coils, egr valve, and transmission. 4 mechanics (three independent shops, including two volvo specialists, and a Midas shop) could not diagnose the cause and $3000 of parts and labor could not fix the problem. Does that mean I should accept an intermittent hesitation? No! I bought a scan tool and did my own diagnosis.

     

    By monitoring the O2 sensor during a normal drive, I found that the system ran lean and then rich anytime the brakes were applied. A simple test at the mechanic shop showed the brake booster was leaking mid-way through its range. This causes the rich condition, and the hesitation if the brakes are applied in just the right way at the right time before accelerating.

     

    Replacing the brake booster tomorrow. An expensive part, but I have finally declared VOCEL:
    Victory Over the Check Engine Light.

     

    My point:
    I'm stubborn in the face of financial costs and disappointment. I have confidence in my investment and I do my own due diligence, and I'm pretty darn savvy when it comes to engineering.
    28 Apr 2014, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    I take my sons car to the service station when it needs to be inspected. They reset the fault codes and the check engine light resets after a certain number of drive miles. Then I get the emissions/safety checked and he's OK for another year. Light comes back on after another day or two. Been that way for 7 years now. Car runs fine and emissions have never been a problem.

     

    Originally the issue was the gas cap seal as the lip on the neck was corroded. What it is now I don't know. And if the routine mentioned above continues to work until the road salt wins out I don't care.
    28 Apr 2014, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (3174) | Send Message
     
    PY
    Congratulations on VOCEL.
    28 Apr 2014, 04:27 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Congrats Patrick! harkens back to the days when I was my own shade-tree mechanic!

     

    No computers made it easier though.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 11:18 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1425) | Send Message
     
    If you are ever in Portugal, you are welcome to fix the emissions light in my dog's Renault - you can even use a hammer in unseen places.
    28 Apr 2014, 11:19 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    More detail coming soon and it won't be 6 months. Maybe.

     

    Kia Introduces 48V Lead-Carbon Hybrid, Collaborates with ALABC

     

    "The 48V lead-carbon hybrid system is among the first of its kind to be demonstrated in collaboration with a major automaker. It will be implemented later this year in one of Kia’s production vehicle platforms (likely, an Optima) and tested according to the specifications of the demonstration project as agreed by the project partners. More specifics about the project will be released in the coming months."

     

    http://bit.ly/1m0VXwR
    28 Apr 2014, 11:43 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1947) | Send Message
     
    Everytime I see ALABC listed as a partner with some OEM, I cringe. Who cares if the battery wasn't the leading act in the mild-hybrid demonstration? Axion turned their nose up to a powerful advocate.
    28 Apr 2014, 01:51 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (3549) | Send Message
     
    Hi PY,
    When tight on money, decisions must be made with the best info on hand. Sometimes winning short term is a loss long term, but the crystal ball still stays cloudy. I know in my personal life I wish I could have afforded certain investments that were financially unavailable at the time. No use kicking myself for it.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:02 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    "Later this year" sounds like 2015 model so we should assume supply chain already in place and Axion not in the picture (or the periphery).

     

    Maybe TG should send the ALABC a hallmark. Sometimes its better to dance with your second or third choice than be a wallflower at the party.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Patrick, Well I guess it's been hashed out before so I'll treat it as water over the dam. We'll never know I guess.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:22 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (439) | Send Message
     
    As I understand the situation at that time, if Axion had decided to work with the ALABC, then Axion would have had to have freely offered up to all the members of the ALABC Axion's technology and present and future expertise on the Axion carbon electrode, which would have probably meant a complete sacrifice and forfeiture by Axion of all its patents and all other intellectual property that it had spent much time and effort and money to develop. So, if that were the case, then it is doubtful that Axion would even exist today at all.
    28 Apr 2014, 02:29 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: Or as I like to mangle it, "that's a bridges under the water".

     

    Somehow seems more apt to me.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 02:37 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Bazooooka, I'm not so sure this statement supports series production. To me it sounds like they are putting the system on production vehicle(s) and testing. The timing from what they had shown in their earlier releases to series production would be IMO too compressed.

     

    "It will be implemented later this year in one of Kia’s production vehicle platforms (likely, an Optima) and tested according to the specifications of the demonstration project as agreed by the project partners..."
    28 Apr 2014, 02:52 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    HTL, Sorry. I'm afraid there isn't much left to mangle by the time I'm done! :-(
    28 Apr 2014, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    "To me it sounds like they are putting the system on production vehicle(s) and testing."

     

    If it is only testing, I find it interesting that they are doing it so publicly.
    28 Apr 2014, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Maybe we're brothers?

     

    http://tinyurl.com/laz...

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 03:39 PM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    Details are still to come in the following months. Sounds to me like not every deal has been signed yet.
    28 Apr 2014, 03:45 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, What is shared and not shared is different for each company. They have different strategies. Sometimes things are shared so that others will be motivated to adopt certain strategies and help to scale the supply base.

     

    The one thing that is assured is that nothing is assured.
    28 Apr 2014, 04:33 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: "The one thing that is assured is that nothing is assured"

     

    That reminds me that all generalizations are false, including this one.

     

    Conundrums, conundrums - the story of an Axion investor's life!

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "As I understand the situation at that time, if Axion had decided to work with the ALABC, then Axion would have had to have freely offered up to all the members of the ALABC Axion's technology and present and future expertise on the Axion carbon electrode,...."

     

    That is the gist of one rationale offered in explanation for Axion's non-participation. Had the exercies involved development of a battery for use in the project, I would find the explanation credible. Other wise ....
    28 Apr 2014, 06:55 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (3174) | Send Message
     
    As we haven't found out what battery is going into it; I don't see how it would have helped Axion any. Maybe it is Axion inside. How; when nobody knows, would it have made any difference if Axion is inside?
    Is there some other battery company getting any press from it?
    If there was we would have heard by now.
    Basically Axion would have dumped money and probably IP down a rat hole with no results so far.
    I don't see that as something to lament about. When somebody is making press then I may consider it a mistake.
    So far no. not at all.
    Axion could say: We have another NDA on something important and maybe some year I can tell you about it.
    Yeah that would really impress us. Would you consider TG a better CEO/communicator/what-... for announcing another NDA?

     

    How many NDA does it take to turn on a light bulb?
    You can have an infinite number ant the light won't go on. Until...
    Some company removes their NDA.

     

    Whatever company has batteries inside, has zip to show. So far that deal would not have helped Axion in the slightest.
    28 Apr 2014, 07:22 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (973) | Send Message
     
    Wouldn't the battery suppliers that were mentioned for BMW be able to supply batteries for more than just BMW?
    If those suppliers have taken the Axion electrodes and made acceptable batteries for BMW then, what delay would there be to supplying KIA instead/also?
    28 Apr 2014, 08:25 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    froggey, since the Kia design is based on the supposedly successful testing of the ALABAC LC superhybrid project, my assumption is that the batteries used in that demonstration would be the most likely ones to go into the Kia. That would be the Exide Orbital lead carbon battery. Supposedly that design was good for 100k+ miles and, if true, would surely meet the "good enough" standard of most auto makers. I am doubtful of the PbC getting a design win here because the different voltage discharge profile would require a design that is different from the LC Superhybrid. It is possible, but I would not bet on it.
    29 Apr 2014, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    NGS, are you thinking of the Honda Insight retrofit that had 100k miles? I believe that one is a hybrid with no mention of the LC Supercharger. It's goal was to show the UltraBattery may replace NiMH in normal hybrids. The charge/discharge profile is different and it's also important to note that the Insight is a small car.

     

    http://bit.ly/1pJPrAs

     

    I don't believe mileage data has been shared about the LC Supercharger project.
    29 Apr 2014, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Unless I'm gravely mistaken, there has been no long distance road testing of the LC SuperHybrid. The ALABC sponsored Honda Insight retrofits using the Ultrabattery have logged over 100,000 miles, but I haven't seen anything that even hints at that type of testing regime for the LC SuperHybrid.

     

    The PbC was the first choice for the LC SuperHybrid project and Axion rejected the offer, presumably because the PR is all about the electrical machines and the battery choice was inconsequential. Since the

     

    PbC's voltage profile was not a problem when CPT and the ALABC were planning the project I seriously doubt if it would be a major stumbling block now.

     

    I don't believe that KIA will start with the PbC because of the price premium. I think there's a good chance that they'll end up with the PbC when testing shows that carbon paste additives cannot deliver the cycle life and performance the electrical machines require.
    29 Apr 2014, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    My reference to 100k+ miles is based on this linked article on the LC Superhybrid. With the following statement attributed to Boris Monahov, program manager of the ALABC:

     

    http://bit.ly/17aiykc

     

    >>The big benefit of lead-carbon batteries is their long cycle life in HEV applications – well above 100,000 road miles – comparable to the life of the vehicle. Utilizing the combination of Faradaic and capacitive processes in the negative plates with added carbon, lead-carbon batteries have been shown to tolerate the relentless high current charging and discharging required in micro-mild hybrids, which are forecast to dominate the automotive market over the coming 10-15 years. <<
    29 Apr 2014, 09:46 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    That article leaves me with a sense of deja mooo – I've heard that BS before.

     

    At the 2012 ALABC in Paris, Banner Battery showed us all how the cow ate the cabbage with carbon additives.

     

    http://bit.ly/QkCOK0

     

    AGM with carbon additives is better than AGM without carbon additives, but it doesn't even come close to providing the kind of dynamic charge acceptance a 48-volt micro-hybrid system will require.

     

    The PbC has demonstrated the kind of cycle life Monahov is talking about in micro-hybrid applications.

     

    The Ultrabattery has demonstrated the the kind of cycle life Monahov is talking about in HEV applications (which is exactly what he said).

     

    Batteries that boast carbon additives in AGM paste mere pretenders.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:02 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Well, Mr. Petersen, you pays your money and you takes your chance. If I was as convinced as you that no other lead carbon battery can meet the good enough standard for microhybrids, I would be buying Axion stock hand over fist. I guess we'll know in another year or two what battery gets employed in the Kia design. Until then.... I'll just wait for some battery sales through some other channel.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:08 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Join me at the ELBC in Edinburgh this September and learn for yourself. It's a great experience when you listen to what the battery manufacturers tell each other instead of listening to what an industry mouthpiece tells a public audience that has no idea there's a difference between a micro-hybrid duty cycle and an HEV duty cycle.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:10 AM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    I thought the UB had less cycle life than the PbC, but why is it being tested in an HEV whereas the PbC is being tested in a micro-hybrid? How is it able to last 100k+?
    29 Apr 2014, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    The only thing I need to see and believe is an announcement of a confirmed design win. Until then, the only facts we have in front of us are that (1) the 48-volt version of the LC superhybrid uses an Exide battery, (2) that the program manager for ALABC (whom you deride as an industry mouthpiece) has publically stated that it is up to the task, and (3) the Kia system is clearly based on the ALABC 48-v superhybrid system.

     

    29 Apr 2014, 10:35 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    >>How is it able to last 100k+? <<

     

    Ranma, I don't know, but apparently it has.

     

    BTW, do you have a link to the information that says PbC is being tested in a microhybrid? I know it was being tested in the lab, but have never seen where it actually made it into a vehicle.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    NGS, we don't know what battery the LC supercharger is using now, and the 100k miles is for the UltraBattery not the Exide Orbital.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:41 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    There are immense differences in the duty cycles of HEV batteries and micro-hybrid batteries.

     

    The Ultrabattery has been tested in a modified Honda Insight using the "EUCAR Power Assist Profile" which runs the battery up and down between 30% and 80% state of charge and focuses on the battery's ability to provide power assist to the drivetrain.

     

    That duty cycle is very different from the "DKE Test EN-50342-6 Dynamic Micro-hybrid Duty Cycle" which keeps the battery in a narrow range between 75% and 80% SOC and focuses on the battery's ability to recover from engine off intervals.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Ranma, I linked my reference to the 100K+ miles for the LC superhybrid in my comment above.

     

    I agree there are also statements that the UltraBattery has logged over 100k miles on the Honda conversions (first in an Insight, now in a Civic). That is not what I was referring to, but it is another data point to suggest a lead-carbon formulation other than PbC can last a long time in an HEV application with high charge and discharge rates.

     

    I'm not trying to argue that the PbC isn't better, but the industry seems to be focused on good enough.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    NGS - There is a world of dis/mis-information out there. It's hard to know who to believe. The one constant appears to be Edison's assessment of the battery space.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:55 AM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    NGS, since that was an ALABC manager who was working with the UB, I have to assume he meant the UB when he said lead-carbon (and possibly the PbC). The data for carbon pastes just doesn't compare.

     

    I agree with your point though. I'd be less bullish if we didn't already hear that progress is happening with auto. That should definitely be asked in the next CC.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:03 AM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2740) | Send Message
     
    JP, pardon my ignorance here, but those duty cycles make it sound like the UB had the harder cycle and PSOC. Am I missing something here? I thought the PbC survives better than others in PSOC and is better for DCA.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    This report from Furuakawa includes a graphic on the EUCAR Power Assist Profile in Figure 8

     

    http://bit.ly/15DvP5Q

     

    The engine off interval is a mere 19 seconds instead of a minute or more and the recharge interval extends the cycle duration out to two minutes, which doesn't provide much useful information for a vehicle that needs to be ready for the next engine off event in 30 seconds.

     

    Like I said, it's very different from the "DKE Test EN-50342-6 Dynamic Micro-hybrid Duty Cycle" that's rapidly becoming an industry standard.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    Idaho National Lab report entitled Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic

     

    http://1.usa.gov/YzTjWw

     

    Good background for those interested in facts.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Interesting comparison of cost numbers between Ni-MH and Ultrabatteries on page 6:

     

    The cost of an UltraBattery is only 18% of that
    of a Ni-MH pack, which is effective for
    reducing HEV costs. The payback time estimate
    calculated based on the fuel cost needed was
    3.2 years for an HEV with an UltraBattery,
    almost half of the 5.9 years for an HEV with an
    Ni-MH pack.

     

    Note this is a 2007 report and Ultrabattery has not yet had a material auto development either.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    EM, Thanks for that informative link to the UB Honda Civic test. A good bottom-line sound bite from the summary: "Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles with minimal loss in performance whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles"

     

    On another note, they also tested Exide Orbital batteries and they failed after only 6,100 cycles in the HEV test profile, but they "performed well" in the C3 Project, especially at high temperatures.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Page 34/35 of EM's document mentions Axion's involvement with lead carbon additive batteries from North Star Battery Co.

     

    I think I have read this document before.

     

    In summary, the results to date suggest that both the ALABC high-carbon North Star Battery Co. and
    Exide technologies require further development before they are ready for use in HEVs. However,
    inconsistencies in cell manufacture may have contributed toward the reliability issues encountered in this study.

     

    (report from 2012)
    29 Apr 2014, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    One of the big problems with trying to compare test reports is that companies use different duty cycles and extrapolate their results to batteries that haven't been tested under those duty cycles.

     

    The Ultrabattery offered satisfactory test performance using the EUCAR Power Assist Profile. Those tests prove nothing about how an AGM with carbon additives will perform in the same duty cycle.

     

    As long as different battery manufacturers are using different standards to make their best case, the results are not fairly comparable. That was the wonderful part of the Banner presentation at ELBC-2012. They used the same duty cycle as Axion to show how the performance of AGM with carbon additives beat AGM without carbon additives. In the process they also showed that AGM with carbon additives can't hold a candle to the PbC in a micro-hybrid application.
    29 Apr 2014, 11:54 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    p. 35
    It also was planned to evaluate a battery pack from Axion Power (with a proprietary negative plate)
    under SHCHEVP. Unfortunately, production of this battery was cancelled and a carbon lead-acid
    technology from Exide was tested in its place. An Exide module (6 V, 10 Ah) is shown in Figure 37.
    29 Apr 2014, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3219) | Send Message
     
    I think it's very interesting that Axion has been focused on li-ion as the main competition for many of its apps, whereas some retail investors are focused on the other lead-carbons. Not sure what to make of that big difference, but it is interesting to me.
    29 Apr 2014, 12:10 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    "Until then, the only facts we have in front of us are that (1) the 48-volt version of the LC superhybrid uses an Exide battery, ..."

     

    Where in the article linked is there reference to Exide batteries?
    29 Apr 2014, 12:23 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    I saw Exide only in a caption of Pic. 4 in the report.

     

    http://bit.ly/ZNy4Ql
    29 Apr 2014, 12:31 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    Here is the relevant paragraph from Kia:
    "The hybrid system consists of a 48V lead carbon battery connected to a small electric motor, increasing the engine’s power output. The battery also supplies energy to an electric supercharger, which increases torque and power at low engine speeds. Under the right conditions, the hybrid powertrain can drive a car in electric-only mode at low speeds and while cruising, while the battery is recharged under deceleration. And when the car is stationary, the technology also acts as a zero-emissions stop-start system, performing this function with almost no noise or vibration as it is a belt-starting system. The technology also enables Kia engineers to reduce the size – and weight – of its vehicles’ existing 12V battery."

     

    That's a two-battery solution. Where have we heard that before? (Axion, for any newcomers) And I thought the UB was supposed to be a two-in-one-battery solution, no? So while I see the UB as most likely, I consider the PbC as a possibility.
    29 Apr 2014, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    EM: IIRC, Axion had a small DOE grant to do a two-battery development program.

     

    HardToLove
    29 Apr 2014, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    Here is the INL report entitled "2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results", dated July 2013.

     

    There are BOT/EOT results from on-road batteries after 100K miles. It's a good complement to the previous report.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/1kc0bPC
    29 Apr 2014, 01:52 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    The company responsible for the conversion is ECOtality. Chapter 11. End of story.
    29 Apr 2014, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    It appears the test cycle they were using was:

     

    Hybrid Pulse Power Characterization
    (HPPC) Test.

     

    Static capacity and HPPC test procedures are based on the FreedomCAR Battery Test Manual for Power-Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, DOE/ID-11069, October 2003, Procedures 3.2 and 3.3, respectively. The measured capacity at BOT testing was used to determine the
    magnitude of current during all HPPC tests.

     

    John - Do you know how this duty cycle compares to the Axion/BMW cycle?
    29 Apr 2014, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    EM -

     

    Looking at the A-1 specification page, it looks like EP replaced a stock battery with a UB ... no second battery.
    29 Apr 2014, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    http://1.usa.gov/1kc93F1

     

    All you want to know about the HPPC. It's not a duty cycle - those are further down in the report.
    29 Apr 2014, 02:16 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    @Stefan, I read the last sentence to mean that they kept it.

     

    "The technology also enables Kia engineers to reduce the size – and weight – of its vehicles’ existing 12V battery."
    29 Apr 2014, 04:16 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    EM -

     

    I agree. The language I was citing was from the UB 2013 report stating that UB replaced a stock battery HEV battery with a UB (but says nothing about a 12v starter battery)
    29 Apr 2014, 04:32 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I think it is two different projects. Kia will be based on the ALABC LC Superhybid project that was based on a Volkswagon Passat. I believe that design keeps a separate 12-v system in addition to the 48-volt.

     

    The UB was used in a Honda Civic HEV project, where they replaced the NiCad battery with lead carbon UB.
    29 Apr 2014, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The replaced battery was NiMH, not NiCd. AFAIK nobody has ever used NiCd in an HEV because of memory effect problems.
    29 Apr 2014, 04:48 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1295) | Send Message
     
    My bad. Sorry for the typo
    29 Apr 2014, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    I also have never heard of NiCd being used in an automotive application. In aerospace yes, but not automotive.
    29 Apr 2014, 04:57 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    SO the one curiosity then in the recent announcement by Kia includes the fact that they will be keeping the 12v starter battery, only downsizing it.

     

    From Axion's Charge Acceptance paper:
    "The first long-term application of the DCA cycle test
    to PbC® batteries (the data shown in Figure 11) initially included the cranking discharge. However, evaluation of this early PbC® battery DCA performance suggested the optimal micro-hybrid architecture involved assignment of the hotel load and cranking discharges to separate function-specific batteries.
    In this configuration, the charge acceptance value
    of the PbC® battery and the cranking power of a small* conventional lead–acid battery are combined in a two-battery solution that maximizes vehicle efficiency without the high cost of the typical advanced architecture components.

     

    *IMO, "downsized" would have been more accurate than "small".
    29 Apr 2014, 08:40 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    By the way, the UltraBattery did not do a stellar job. While it retained it's performance on charge acceptance, at 100,000 miles it already showed a 20% drop on power output. I'm no fan of that. The cost of replacing the 4-battery 48V battery pack would likely be less than the cost of replacing a worn-out engine, but still a $1000-$2000 job, I imagine.
    29 Apr 2014, 08:51 PM Reply Like
  • KillaCycle
    , contributor
    Comments (633) | Send Message
     
    The early HEVs used NiCds.
    http://bit.ly/1fwetys

     

    They lost out to NiMH not because of "memory effect" but due to the problems with the toxic metal (cadmium), and the higher specific energy of NiMH (as well as the higher specific power of NiMH.)

     

    The "memory effect" of NiCds is really over blown. It is really a "stale charge" phenomena. If you don't discharge a NiCd cell for quite some time, the output voltage drops a bit. All the A-hrs are there, just at slightly reduced voltage. The longer you wait, the greater the percentage of output voltage drop. (It does not ever go to zero.)

     

    It also happens that if you don't access some portion of that full charge for a long time, that drop in voltage from "stale charge" is felt for that portion of the discharge. This is the so called "memory effect."

     

    Thus, the "memory effect" really had nothing to do with why NiCds fell out of favor in HEVs, because stale charge never really occurred in HEV cycle use. There was no portion of the charge that was not accessed for long enough to develop "stale charge". The HEV would not really notice or care if the battery pack lost a percentage of voltage somehow, regardless.

     

    I should note that the "stale charge" effect, to some degree, occurs in _all_ battery chemistries. No exceptions to date. You always get peak performance on a very recently cycled battery.
    30 Apr 2014, 12:10 AM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (2814) | Send Message
     
    Is it true you can revitalize old NiCd batteries with an arc welder? http://bit.ly/R1G0wl
    30 Apr 2014, 04:25 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    NGS: You are not to blame - it was a "memory effect problem"! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    30 Apr 2014, 06:58 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Dummy's Guide to Carbon Additives

     

    John, Are you a subscriber?

     

    http://bit.ly/1m0YA1v
    28 Apr 2014, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Unfortunately, I'm not a BEST subscriber.
    28 Apr 2014, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Drats! Thanks.
    28 Apr 2014, 12:06 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Menage-a-tois?

     

    Siemens and France weigh in as GE eyes Alstom deal

     

    BY BENJAMIN MALLET AND MARIA SHEAHAN
    PARIS/FRANKFURT Sun Apr 27, 2014 11:58pm BST

     

    http://reut.rs/1it8aMF

     

    "French President Francois Hollande gathered his top ministers on Sunday evening to discuss Alstom's case. The company said separately it would make an announcement no later than Wednesday morning and that it had asked for its shares to remain suspended from trading until then."

     

    Trading? Who needs it?

     

    Wikipedia to the resuce!

     

    "Some known historical examples of ménages à trois are" ...

     

    http://bit.ly/1it8aMG

     

    Totally took your mind off yet another week started with no news from AXPW, n'est pas?

     

    EDIT:
    Today's update:

     

    France meets Alstom bidders with pledge to protect jobs

     

    BY NATALIE HUET AND BENJAMIN MALLET
    PARIS Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:55pm BST

     

    http://reut.rs/1m1uoDu
    28 Apr 2014, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (484) | Send Message
     
    HT Love:: OT: Do I remember you saying one time you owned, or were thinking of owning some OOIL? I own a small starter position - wanted to talk about it if relevant.
    28 Apr 2014, 04:51 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    James: Twernt me.

     

    But hang around - that person will post I'm sure.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Apr 2014, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (3174) | Send Message
     
    James
    Maya has owned it in the past. Not sure about presently.
    28 Apr 2014, 06:01 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (820) | Send Message
     
    JB,

     

    Maya and a few others I believe have suggested that they have or had owned OOIL along with myself. I continue to hold a few shares in the company but I have grave concerns about the management! Of course I might be able to make that statement about other companies that I own stock in!

     

    OOIL is suppose to launch their Frackwater cleanup showcase near the end of May. They plan to license their technology to OEMs to use in their systems. They have a very interesting techology and it could be huge if it proves out to be true, sound familiar?? One thing that I will add is to look at the compensation package that the CEO has set up for himself. He is giving himself 30 million shares for what I believe is sub standard performance!

     

    Just saying,

     

    RBrun357
    28 Apr 2014, 07:29 PM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (484) | Send Message
     
    RBrun:: Yea - I noticed that the rest of the shareholders get diluted by 40% just to compensate the executive team for doing their jobs (getting to $2.5 million annual revenue).

     

    The rest of your comments pretty much match my opinion. Like most of the other companies in this space, they are burning money - and constantly diluting to stay alive. So its a question of when income can come close to matching expenses, and how much we get diluted before then - with the management dilution on top of that.

     

    AXPW has the same story, but apparently without the huge management payout. So I guess in comparison, AXPW is the better deal - more or less.
    28 Apr 2014, 09:07 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (820) | Send Message
     
    JB,

     

    "AXPW has the same story, but apparently without the huge management payout. So I guess in comparison, AXPW is the better deal - more or less."

     

    I defintly agree that Axion is a better deal, at last I am hoping so! I only have about 20k shares of OOIL and over 25 times that of Axion!

     

    Time will tell.
    28 Apr 2014, 09:44 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message
     
    JB, RBrun -- I bought a very small "tracking reminder" position in OOIL two or three years back when "the story" was tech for greatly reducing cost of algae oil extraction. Sold it after six months or so. Management was hyping a bunch and selling shares more than anything else. Looked at it again when "the story" changed to frack water cleanup but did not see enough to entice re-investment. I seem to recall doing a split or reverse split at some point so would not take current (or recent) shares outstanding at face value.

     

    Personally, I would look at OOIL as a possible trading vehicle but not consider it as an investment. AXPW now qualifies as trading vehicle rather than possible vehicle.
    28 Apr 2014, 11:13 PM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (332) | Send Message
     
    JamesBB . . I agree with all the other replies above, especially that 'AXPW is a better deal'. I owned briefly 10Kshares of OOIL years back (19jan2010-8feb2010) when the story seemed new. Did make a gain (bot@.295, sld@.34) so it was a successful trade.

     

    Two brothers, one the creative genius, the other running the business, mmm, certainly could work but I have other places much easier to spend my Due Diligence time. That said, I am considering jumping back in on a purely speculative (willing to lose it all) basis.

     

    100dayMA is steadily declining and has been breached higher only a handful of times for the past year, not good; however, at .178 it is ~20% below 100dayMA so, together with the 'news' of current developments (frack water clean-up etc.) I may just toss the dice with a small portion of my 'mad money'. And I repeat, with a willing to lose it all 'tude.

     

    29 Apr 2014, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Hard to beat a Press Release that starts out

     

    Highpower Rolls Out ...

     

    If only it were a Colorado Corporation ...

     

    Highpower Rolls Out Commercial Ready Solar Compatible Energy Storage System (ESS) Products

     

    Products Ranging From 0.5KWH to 15KWH

     

    http://bit.ly/1itwgqJ

     

    "The series of ESS products, designed and developed by Highpower's subsidiary, Icon Energy, will serve the needs of commercial and residential power systems, solar power, back-up emergency power, and outdoor uses. Highpower's ESS products include power capacities of 0.5KWH, 1.5KWH, 3KWH, 5KWH, and 15KWH, coupled with dual charging input modes, i.e. city grid and solar power compatible.

     

    The output modes are flexible with AC, DC at varying voltages. The switch between charging and discharging is intelligently designed, and the switch time is only 5-8 milliseconds, generating no impact to electrical appliances connected. GPRS-enabled real-time wireless monitoring is also built in for remote management.

     

    For additional information about our Energy Storage Systems, please visit:

     

    http://bit.ly/1itwiPd
    "
    28 Apr 2014, 04:55 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (724) | Send Message
     
    Toyota moving HQ to Texas, thanks to Rick Perry's charm and $40M
    http://lat.ms/1jaKITf

     

    I would think Axion would be worth half as much.
    28 Apr 2014, 08:30 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1693) | Send Message
     
    Islands around the world are home to around 600 million people.

     

    One of the Canary islands (Spain) is about to be the worlds first energy self sufficient island! How? Combining wind power with pumped hydro. No batteries in sight.

     

    Certainly an elegant solution, very impressive!

     

    Read more: http://read.bi/1m4dGU9
    28 Apr 2014, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    04/28/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 67, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 50000, Vol: 454596, AvTrSz: 6785
    Min. Pr: 0.1351, Max Pr: 0.1498, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1440
    # Buys, Shares: 22 99077, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1455
    # Sells, Shares: 44 340519, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1435
    # Unkn, Shares: 1 15000, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.1450
    Buy:Sell 1:3.44 (21.79% "buys"), DlyShts 66600 (14.65%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 19.56%

     

    Yesterday, Friday, seemed to confirm that a move lower was coming as predicted, as ... Today continued to support that thesis as we have continued low volume and lower VWAP. Including two abnormal trades, we also had a lower low and high. If I discount those two trades, we still have a lower low and high and a compressed range of 4.79% instead of the 10.88% spread shown when including those two trades. Don't be fooled by the traditional TA charts – the high and close of the day was a single isolated 5K trade at $0.1498 at 15:59:51 – can't slice that much thinner. The next highest price was $0.1476 that had multiple trades and some volume.

     

    Yesterday my non-traditional stuff also suggested we'd be moving a bit lower, based on such as average trade size, average buy percentage, average short percentage and average volume all weakening and quite low. VWAP was showing weakening in the 10 and 25-day averages. I suspected we'd revisit the 200-day SMA as a first test of what might be the lower bound of consolidation, if that's what we're doing here.

     

    Today doesn't do anything to change that thought.

     

    The average of the lowest 20 VWAPs times 80% today is 04/28: 20 lowest intra-day VWAPs in 40 days avg, $0.1442, x 80%: $0.1153 vs. $0.1135, $0.1114, $0.1093, $0.1071, $0.1049, $0.1029, $0.1012, $0.0996 and $0.0979 on prior days. 80% of today's VWAP is $0.1152 vs. $0.1177, $0.1198, $0.1196, $0.1180, $0.1148, $0.1075, $0.1100, $0.1154 and $0.1313 on prior days. These are potential prices for the next tranche of shares to the PIPErs.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved -6.83%, -0.07%, -2.14%, 0.69%, +0.69% respectively. Price spread today was 10.88% vs. 3.38%, 4.76%, 2.37%, 7.86%, 7.14%, 13.76%, 19.23%, 21.48% and 7.97% on prior days.

     

    The low of the day was set by a single trade ... The high of the day was set with a single trade ...

     

    Today had marginally better, but still very low, volume for the fourth consecutive day.

     

    The larger trades (>= 14.9K - special for today only to include 1 more trade) occurred on 9 of the 67 trades, 13.43%. These 250,300 shares were 55.06% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1439. 0 of these trades were buys. 8 ...

     

    The other 58 trades, 86.57% of the day's trades, traded 204,296 shares, 44.94% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1441. 22 trades ...

     

    My original inflection point calculations are really uncertain in the one-day changes ...

     

    The newer inflection point calculations' chart pattern continues strongly negative today. Even with continued low volume, which made me loathe to place too much weight on it yesterday, I have to say lower price looks most likely to continue.

     

    All the usual in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    29 Apr 2014, 07:58 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (973) | Send Message
     
    "I have to say lower price looks most likely to continue."

     

    For what may be the last chance to get "cheap" shares. The "Spring Thaw" for news could happen at any time.
    BySolar making money even without the solar arrays completely installed would certainly tweak some interest.
    29 Apr 2014, 08:23 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Since the batteries were sold to a Bysolar customer and then integrated with the customer's solar panels I don't expect the installation to be a well-spring of future news unless there are problems or the customer agreed to share data with Axion in connection with a long-term study of system economics.

     

    Customers like NS and ePower are likely to generate a recurring flow of news and possibly data, but I wouldn't expect more news from Bysolar until they sell another system that integrates PbC batteries.
    29 Apr 2014, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1693) | Send Message
     
    "Diesel used to be 87 cents a gallon; now it’s $3.99."

     

    The struggle of owner-operators (truckers):
    http://wapo.st/1pJO8By
    29 Apr 2014, 09:08 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It truly is a tragedy, which is why we think the prospect of cutting annual fuel costs by $25,000 to $30,000 per tractor can make a real difference.
    29 Apr 2014, 09:22 AM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1693) | Send Message
     
    I'm rooting hard for ePower.

     

    The lack of capital experienced by these owner-operators seems to indicate they would need a lease model a la Solar City, where you cover the upfront cost of the retrofit in exchange for the driver paying you back out of his fuel savings.
    29 Apr 2014, 09:51 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    We're focusing on the fleets first because they have the easiest access to capital and they typically run their own maintenance facilities that can do kit installations in-house. Getting our drivetrain qualified for conventional lease financing is very high on our list of second priority goals.
    29 Apr 2014, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Audrey Zibleman attempting to reform the regulatory structure in New York -

     

    http://bit.ly/1mUrgNR
    29 Apr 2014, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    'Make No Little Plans'

     

    Published: February 7, 1999

     

    http://nyti.ms/1kbf2K4

     

    "To the Editor:

     

    Herbert Stein (''How to Solve Almost Anything,'' Op-Ed, Feb. 3) quotes Winston Churchill as saying, ''Make no small plans.''

     

    As any Chicagoan will tell you, the bold statement ''make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men's blood'' should be credited to Daniel Burnham, the architect who, along with John Root, planned the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. His foresight and planning were also largely responsible for the rebuilding of Chicago after the fire of 1871. Churchill may have subscribed to a similar philosophy, but the words are Burnham's.

     

    GAIL GOLDSTEIN
    Highland Park, Ill., Feb. 3, 1999"
    29 Apr 2014, 11:43 AM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (332) | Send Message
     
    Thanks wtb . . As long as we are on the subject, let us too remember another great Chicago Architect of that era, Louis Henry Sullivan. He was mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright and in my reading Mr. Sullivan is the only other Architect Mr. Wright ever said a complementary word about, calling him the 'Master of Terra Cotta'.

     

    Sadly Mr. Sullivan died something of a broken man in 1924, unappreciated to a degree until 1944 when he posthumously received the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal. A great man, RIP Mr. Sullivan.

     

    29 Apr 2014, 12:08 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Don't know if they'll be successful, and we know there will always be PRBS :-) but kudos to New York to doing something different.

     

    Several of the Cable channels I watch are pretty saturated with ads about their new tax free zones and attempts to draw businesses (and more importantly jobs) to the state. I'd say they're pretty effective in at the very least the "made you look" department.

     

    Big city mayors and governors ... gotta actually solve problems and get "stuff" done.

     

    Refreshing when they show some ambition, vision, inspiration, imagination, risk taking ... for the whole (while of course always serving their own political ambition.)

     

    May we be blessed with many more of them ...

     

    Dang it, even on this cynical depressed group, (lately) I'm gonna feel optimistic for a few seconds ... and even throw you this:

     

    US high school graduation rates hit historic high (+video)

     

    Four-year high school graduation rates hit 80 percent, capping a decade of significant improvement and suggesting that US schools can hit even more ambitious goals by 2020.

     

    By Amanda Paulson, Staff writer / April 28, 2014

     

    http://bit.ly/1kbtt0J

     

    And for all y'all cynics:

     

    http://bit.ly/1kbtvG7
    29 Apr 2014, 12:21 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Nothing like a jobs mega-recession to keep kids in school...
    29 Apr 2014, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Schneider Electric Partners with Canadian Energy on Off-Grid Solar and Backup Power

     

    http://bit.ly/1kbdlfO
    29 Apr 2014, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    You are here: Home > Products > Solar Off-Grid and Back-up > Inverters/Chargers

     

    http://bit.ly/1mUCr97

     

    Wonder what ZBB or Princeton Power would say about these products ...
    29 Apr 2014, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Well Schneider is a 500 lb gorilla compared to them so I'm sure they understand their offerings. Schneider makes the Modicon controllers that Axion used on the PowerCube and was going to use on the Hub. Also serves as the man/machine interface.

     

    I've used millions of USD's worth of the stuff over the years. As to their latest offerings. I'm in "Dim Awareness".
    29 Apr 2014, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Gridtential Energy Launches Alpha Battery Program; Signs JDA for Outdoor Power Equipment Applications With First Partner, MTD Products

     

    http://bit.ly/1mUCjX6
    29 Apr 2014, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Other than the fact that the input materials cost too much this is a low cost solution that is going to take the world by storm. Jeez!

     

    Floodgates Open For Vanadium Flow Batteries

     

    " Vanadium flow batteries offer the kind of low cost, high capacity energy storage solutions that will help transform the wind and the sun into power sources that rival fossil fuel plants for stability and reliability, but as always there are a couple of catches: where to get the silvery transition metal vanadium, and how to keep the price down?"

     

    http://bit.ly/1mUHfv3
    _

     

    And if that wasn't enough BS for you, try keeping a straight face while you read this article on the vanadium wonder flow battery.

     

    The Forever Battery

     

    http://bit.ly/1mUHfv9
    29 Apr 2014, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3219) | Send Message
     
    Next up from the Oxymoron Cost/Benefit Dept: palladium bricks and nano deposition dirt.
    29 Apr 2014, 01:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I, LOL! "nano deposition dirt".
    29 Apr 2014, 01:41 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    ARCA doing hit-and-run today.

     

    Last in at $0.145 for just a couple minutes and gone again.

     

    HardToLove
    29 Apr 2014, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3219) | Send Message
     
    HTL, only took about 70k shares to take out ARCA's 5k/6k present at .145, lol. Seems like there outta be a rule against fake present volumes...
    29 Apr 2014, 01:39 PM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (332) | Send Message
     
    Anyone know anything about the 3000sh @.155 trade (pre-market I believe)?
    29 Apr 2014, 02:14 PM Reply Like
  • Chip Beckett
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    I am a veterinarian, farmer, and Town Council Chairman that likes finance and investments. I am focused on my " mad money" account being alternative energy and ways to change the world in a good, and profitable, way. I have a very long time horizon in my investment themes.
    30 Apr 2014, 09:07 PM Reply Like
  • Chip Beckett
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    I bought it thru schwab, market price as I do every few weeks
    30 Apr 2014, 09:10 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Hi Chip! Welcome to the concentrators!

     

    HardToLove
    1 May 2014, 07:39 AM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (332) | Send Message
     
    Thank you Mr. Beckett,

     

    And yes, welcome to the the concentrators, a lively, often fun, and valuable place for AXPW investors and other things.
    1 May 2014, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19434) | Send Message
     
    Geo: All I know it wasn't pre-market, it was at the open, 09:30:08.

     

    It was a "buy" when bid ask coming into the trade was $0.143/$0.155, 5K/5K, NITE/CANT.

     

    HardToLove
    29 Apr 2014, 02:54 PM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (332) | Send Message
     
    Thanks HTL, for some reason it did not show up on my Scottrade Time&Sales window which I had active prior to the open. No big deal, just curious. I would like to think it was someone who just wanted the shares . . and a good idea if so, IMO.
    29 Apr 2014, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (3105) | Send Message
     
    I received yet another Energy Storage Association meeting reminder, which will be in DC in June. Mostly focused in stationary energy projects. Axion is not exhibiting nor presenting. Vani presented at the ESA conference I attended 2 years ago.

     

    http://bit.ly/1kct7ao
    29 Apr 2014, 03:09 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    RK - IIRC, we heard about potentially 50-75 NS locomotives from that conference.
    29 Apr 2014, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3684) | Send Message
     
    Yup,

     

    I guess travel budget is light assuming Axion's funds aren't brimming come June. Or maybe Vani is busy with other proposals.
    29 Apr 2014, 07:48 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Egg-white derived activated carbons display an eggs-tremely high pseudocapacitance in asymmetric supercapacitors

     

    http://rsc.li/1kcICPC
    29 Apr 2014, 03:58 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11197) | Send Message
     
    No wonder that when I whip up some egg whites and then fold them into New Hope Mills pancake batter that I have more psuedocapacitance.
    29 Apr 2014, 08:12 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    My color picture of a PbC:

     

    I want to make green ink. Which represents energy.
    I have a five gallon bucket of blue. That's the PbO2 electrode.
    I have a 1/2 cup of yellow. That's the carbon electrode.

     

    What is the capacity of my battery?
    1 cup of green ink.

     

    Just following up.

     

    http://bit.ly/1kd6QsU

     

    This is a link to a thesis paper on symmetric and asymmetric capacitors.

     

    For those interested, I would direct your attention to the graph on p.70, where the energy density (or capacity or capacitance) of an asymmetric capacitor is nearly doubled by using a better form of carbon, while the power density only improved by 15%. The "better form" of carbon holds more charges - yellow ink.

     

    Again, on p.90, the conclusions are evident in the statements being made re' future work:

     

    (1) Negative electrode
     Find different types of active carbon to obtain higher specific capacitance of the asymmetric cell because the capacitance of the cell is limited by the negative electrode. (More carbon, better carbon = more yellow ink = more green ink)
    (2) Positive electrode
     Optimize the mass ratio of the positive electrode and negative electrode to achieve higher capacitance, energy density and power density. (This is suggesting maybe we don't need 5-gallon bucket of blue ink if all we have is 1/2 cup of yellow - in other words, adding more carbon per unit lead will improve capacity, energy *and* power.)

     

    That's all I'm saying. This bodes well for the technology. While the truck battery works well, perhaps well enough some might interject (though not me), who would say that doubling the capacity would not be a further advantage?
    29 Apr 2014, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (10233) | Send Message
     
    Will Most Trains in the Future run on Electricity?

     

    "...The question is will trains continue to be powered by fossil fuels? The cost of energy is a big issue for train operators. In North America there are plans to change over to diesel locomotives fueled by Liquid Natural Gas. With Natural Gas currently much cheaper than diesel fuel this seems to make a great deal of sense.

     

    But this is easier said than done. This will require major changes in the equipment used by the railroads and will be a major investment. Liquid fuel is the most efficient way to carry enough energy to run trains a long distance. But liquefying Natural Gas requires refrigerating it by hundreds of degrees below zero. This is not cheap and requires a great deal of energy to do. Also new facilities will needed to fuel trains with Liquid Natural Gas and a reliable way to carry it on trains will be needed. The plan is to build “tenders” to carry the Liquid Natural Gas for the locomotives on a freight trains. A recent news story run by Reuters reports that after a year of experimenting with running trucks with Liquid Natural Gas; the Canadian Trucking Company Bison Transport found the savings less and the problems more than expected."

     

    "What we could see in the near future are plug-in hybrid locomotives. The main use of energy..."

     

    http://bit.ly/1kdES03
    29 Apr 2014, 07:15 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1693) | Send Message
     
    I wish folks would stop messing around with NG for trucks. I don't expect the price to stay low and it distracts from the opportunities in hybridization.
    29 Apr 2014, 09:18 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (3804) | Send Message
     
    I agree, D Lane. Economically weak and temporary. All that refrigeration. And you're still producing fossil-fuel exhaust gases.
    That said, no matter what they burn, hybridization still offers real gains. And that would include hydrogen.

     

    Hybridization is like free fuel. Regenerative braking energy is like free fuel. And whatever is being burned on board, there is an optimal burn rate (fuel cells, too, I imagine) which is at times in excess and at others in deficit - the ability to buffer the burn with batteries yields free fuel.
    30 Apr 2014, 08:10 AM Reply Like
  • tahoe1780
    , contributor
    Comments (111) | Send Message
     
    I also agree. I keep reading articles like this (a repost from the end of the last concentrator) http://bit.ly/S0wfzE As in this article, they refer to "at current rates of consumption", then go on to propose vast new markets.
    30 Apr 2014, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • tahoe1780
    , contributor
    Comments (111) | Send Message
     
    Another one: http://bit.ly/R01hH2
    30 Apr 2014, 11:39 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4788) | Send Message