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  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (245) | Send Message
     
    Cinderella Story ??
    16 May, 05:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8830) | Send Message
     
    Drats HTL! 8-D

     

    Way to go CO3!!
    16 May, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (245) | Send Message
     
    I'd like to thank my wife,
    for going shopping & allowing me to be
    in the right place at the write time ...

     

    and my browser, for updating quickly ....

     

    Now back to our regularly scheduled comments
    16 May, 05:10 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: That's what happens when those Romulan ladies get you distracted ... or was it Klingon ladies injured you? ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    16 May, 05:34 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8830) | Send Message
     
    HTL, It was the ale. And anything green is good regardless of the cost!

     

    http://bit.ly/1gbwxya
    16 May, 05:53 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    The big question is which is green sexier, yours or mine?

     

    http://bit.ly/RJ0Xws
    16 May, 05:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8830) | Send Message
     
    John, You've indicated in the past that catching one leaves the task of knowing what to do with the success these days. But anyway, based on your updates, I don't think I could catch your more esthetically pleasing recomendation.

     

    Now that I think about it, not a problem. It's not a sleeper cab.
    16 May, 06:09 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    uhhh, iindelco, I hate to disagree, rarely do, but I can think of quite a few things that aren't good in green.
    16 May, 06:16 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    re': "It's not a sleeper cab."

     

    No, it's a SuperCab.

     

    ok, I've had enough.
    16 May, 06:16 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    JP, You win hands down.
    17 May, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • cstone
    , contributor
    Comments (17) | Send Message
     
    Can it be? 2 years to be #1? guess I missed by a few seconds

     

    Of more interest, anyone know why there is no record of insider trades in the last year or so. I am just wondering why the officers are not buying at such low prices.
    16 May, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Retail investors love to see officers and directors buy stock in the open market.

     

    Securities lawyers that represent public companies or directors and officers of public companies hate to see insiders buy or sell in any discretionary account. Rule 10b5 trading plans are pretty safe, but insiders who actively buy or sell are just begging for regulatory scrutiny and/or investor lawsuits.

     

    Under the Federal Securities Laws it is illegal for an officer or director of a public company to sell OR buy his company's stock if he has possession of material non-public information.

     

    Any time a director, officer or affiliate makes a profit on any purchase and sale pair that occur within six months of each other, the entire profit must be disgorged to the company under the short-swing trading rules.

     

    A bigger risk arises when a director or officer thinks to himself "This potential deal with XYZ is coming together nicely so I think I'll load up on my stock." If that happens, the director or officer is facing the same orange jumpsuit risk Martha Stewart faced when she heard "The potential deal with XYZ is going south so I better dump now."

     

    While it's not a document investors look at very often, the "Corporate Governance" subsection under the "About Axion" page on their website includes links to a "Code of Business Conduct and Ethics" I drafted in 2004 that says:

     

    "Our employees and consultants are prohibited from buying and selling our common stock without prior written approval from management at the appropriate level, including, if necessary and appropriate, to the board of directors. Directors and executive officers must receive written pre-clearance from our general counsel before they enter into any transaction in our common stock. These prohibitions extend to and include accounts held by children, spouses and relatives who live in the same residence as a director, officer, employee or consultant. All transactions in our common stock must be made during a time when a trading window is open.

     

    Federal law and our policies prohibit our directors, officers, employees and consultants from purchasing or selling our stock while in the possession of material, non-public information concerning our company. This prohibition extends to and includes indirect transactions through controlled corporations, family members, nominees and other third parties. Violations of insider trading laws may be punishable by fines and/or imprisonment under applicable laws.

     

    Material, information is any information that could reasonably be expected to affect the price of our stock. If you are considering buying or selling our stock because of inside information that you possess, you should assume that the information is material. It is also important to keep in mind that if any trade you make becomes the subject of an investigation by the government, the trade will be viewed after-the-fact with the benefit of hindsight. Consequently, you should always carefully consider how your trades would look from this perspective.

     

    Information is considered to be non-public unless it has been adequately disclosed to the public, which means that the information must be publicly disclosed, and adequate time must have passed for the securities markets to digest the information. Examples of adequate disclosure include public filings with securities regulatory authorities and the issuance of press releases, and may also include meetings with members of the press and the public. A delay of one business day is generally considered a sufficient period for routine information to be absorbed by the market, although a longer period of delay might be considered appropriate in more complex decisions.

     

    If family or friends of a director, officer, employee or consultant ask for advice about buying or selling our stock, it should not be provided. Federal law and our policies also prohibit a director, officer, employee or consultant from "tipping" family or friends regarding material, nonpublic information that they learn about our company in the course of their employment. The same penalties apply, regardless of whether a director, officer, employee or consultant derives any benefit from the trade. You should avoid discussing sensitive company information in any place where others may overhear your conversation."
    16 May, 05:24 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    The version that was filed with the SEC on March 30, 2004 is here:

     

    http://1.usa.gov/1gbvXR7
    16 May, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • cstone
    , contributor
    Comments (17) | Send Message
     
    Thank you, John.

     

    Re: "Federal law and our policies prohibit our directors, officers, employees and consultants from purchasing or selling our stock while in the possession of material, non-public information concerning our company."

     

    Obviously, officers and BOD's of most/all public companies are subject to the same or similar restrictions, yet Form 4-reported sales are available on many websites and not uncommon.

     

    Axion may be different because:
    a) As a development stage company, the insiders 'always' have (really!) material, non-public info, and/or
    b) The insiders, general counsel, BOD etc may be more conservative in their interpretation of the law or their decisions to not buy/sell, and/or
    c) The Axion insiders may not be inclined to buy (or sell) for whatever other reasons they may have.

     

    I speculate that (a) and (b) are key factors...dunno about (c), tho that is sorta what I was wondering about. If we assume (a) and (b), (c) is a moot point as my mind reading skills are non-existent.
    16 May, 06:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    What you'll typically see these days are directors and officers buying or selling through 10b5 trading plans where all discretionary authority rests with the brokerage firm that administers the plan. The big problem with a 10b5 plan, of course, is an officer or director can't have material non-public information when he establishes the plan.

     

    It's pretty easy to do if you're the president of the XYZ widget company that simply sells a product and grows its business organically. When you have a company like Axion with several projects going on behind the scenes with first tier giants, the risk is overwhelming.

     

    I've always been a monumental pain when clients wanted to buy their stock in the open market. Unless they were willing to swear there was nothing going on beyond sales in the normal course of business, my advice was always "Don't do it."

     

    There's even a subset of the securities bar that does nothing but scour SEC filings to track insider trading and file lawsuits whenever there's a hint of a problem. It's one of the most dangerous things in the world.
    16 May, 07:27 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2494) | Send Message
     
    While there definitely are issues that can arise from insider trading, I differ in opinion with John with respect to circumstances here. I think the answer is much simpler, Axion simply hasn't been a good investment yet.
    17 May, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (957) | Send Message
     
    "Material, information is any information that could reasonably be expected to affect the price of our stock."

     

    I would imagine TG has knowledge of a great many things that would be expected to affect the price of the stock, mostly to the upside. Regarding PowerCubes, NSC, and "initiatives" with secret interested parties.
    18 May, 07:39 AM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    @Stefan. The fact Mr. Granville has virtually no shares of stock in this "lead carbon story" speaks volumes. This, unfortunately, puts his interests squarely against my own interests for very obvious reasons that are RARELY talked about on this board.

     

    In fact, to frame this in a more positive light for the die-hards: When Sir Thomas begins to remunerate himself in Stock (instead of cash-only from "PIPE-like" share dilution deals (or the pending RS) on the backs of Axionistas), we will know we've turned the corner on sales (and that he is serious in his prognostications).

     

    Were not there.... yet...or ever... time will tell
    18 May, 04:10 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    I have a very hard time when critics call 696,600 paid for shares and 442,750 options "virtually no shares of stock in this story."

     

    I know the magnitude of the checks Tom wrote to Axion as one of its founders. I know the amount of taxes he had to pay on shares that he took as partial compensation for services while I was chairman – shares that he never sold.

     

    If you want to criticize, check your facts first.

     

    Tom ought to have bigger equity incentives than he does, but it's probably good that he doesn't because it would just be something else for demagogues to whine about.
    18 May, 04:21 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2494) | Send Message
     
    OR -To be fair, he does have about 6 or 7 hundred thousand shares and if I recall correctly he did put $500K or so into the company originally. However, insiders buy shares of stock in their companies every day.

     

    In any event, it's a data point that may investors use in analyzing stocks.
    18 May, 04:24 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Insiders only buy stock in their own companies when they can convince their lawyers that there's nothing going on behind the scenes that could reasonably be expected to impact the stock price.
    18 May, 04:28 PM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    JP - I agree with the 696,600 owned shares but the options are worthless given the exercise price. I would also suggest that you look at how much stock TG has purchased in the past ten years because that number is telling.

     

    I too am a big believer in the facts.
    18 May, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Tom made a substantial investment in Axion when he was a member of the founders group and able to pursue his unrelated business activities without restriction. When he took the CEO job he had to hire somebody else to run his company and curtail most of the ancillary activities that used to occupy his time and keep beans on his table.

     

    There are lots of ways to invest in a company and they don't all involve writing checks. Sometimes a responsible critic needs to make allowances for the huge opportunity costs of the paths not taken after your partners forced you to accept a CEO role you didn't really want.
    18 May, 04:45 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    O.R.: Compensation options should align his interests?
    From the filing ...
    Options outstanding at March 31,2014: 5,843,390 $ 1.07 exercise price
    Options exercisable at March 31, 2014: 4,146,523 $ 1.40 exercise price.

     

    I don't know what percentage are his options though.

     

    In the EOY filing I did find "The Company also granted Mr. Granville an option to purchase 360,000 shares of our common stock at a price of $1.50 per share at a vesting rate of 10,000 shares per month through the term of the agreement".

     

    ISTR a filing somewhere that listed all options held by all the officers and BOD, but darned if I can find them now (I'm too lazy to go all the way back through all the filings).

     

    Anyway, I just wondered why you feel he has few shares, since I consider the options equivalent to shares if he can get them into the money and just the last award of options was roughly 1/3rd of a million.

     

    I'm much more worried about the outstanding warrants that will heavily cap our upside since many of them are at pps prices we could reasonably expect to see during their lifetime.

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    John - I am not buying that line.
    TG has been very well paid if not over paid and better paid then he had ever been before. Don't try to tell me what you know - I know better.
    18 May, 08:19 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    What TG earned in prior positions and activities has very little to do with his current activities and compensation.

     

    Among obvious examples, someone who makes a lot of money throwing baseballs is not necessarily qualified to run a business with thousands of employees, even though the income may be similar. Michael Jordan is an example of someone who does/did one thing very well, and since tried doing a lot of things, generally not very well (like baseball, executive, and golf).

     

    TG made choices of changing careers. There is no reason that because a decade or more ago he was very effective (or at least well paid) means that his present performance should be at the same level.
    18 May, 08:40 PM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    I am also concerned about the PIPE warrants that are huge in number and at a reachable exercise price.

     

    TG's options on the other hand were priced based on what management was projecting their performance should cause the shares to be worth. For ten years management's promised performance never happened and so their options never came to be worth the paper they were written on, nor should they have. The cash bonuses given to management and to TG in particular were a horse of another color.

     

    Management (and JP) now asks us to trust the BoD and the NASDAC rules to look out for our interests relative to the zillions of authorized shares they are asking us to approve?

     

    Not me - my vote is NO to this request for a blank check.
    18 May, 09:49 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    @JP, HTL, et al: I stand corrected. I did not consider his Options; nor his initial investments that JP mentioned in his rebuttal to my post above. I was only referring to his current number of shares (ownership) in the company.

     

    At any rate, it was a poor comment and I failed to correctly represent the facts... as we'd say in my old squadron... my bad!

     

    At any rate, I will be taking a break from commenting for a while. My frustrations have gotten the better of me lately and while I'm generally a very positive person, I've become too "troll-like" in my judgments and comments in the last 2-3 weeks. It's not my normal nature and thus, a very clear sign that I need to "step away."

     

    Good luck to my fellow Axionistas.
    19 May, 12:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    PbC Believer> Warrants present a very different dynamic than common stock. There are about 17.3 million Senior Note Warrants spread among four holders, so lets call it 4.5 million shares each. There are also 1.9 million Junior Note Warrants.

     

    A warrant is only profitable to the extent of the spread between the exercise price of the warrant and the market price of the underlying common stock. With a $0.30 exercise price, a warrant holder could realize a $225,000 profit if the stock price stabilized at $0.35 and a $900,000 profit if the stock price stabilized at $0.50.

     

    I think it unlikely that all holders of warrants will choose to exercise at the same time. A couple may decide to settle for a quick $225,000 profit but others could easily hold out for $900,000 or more. It doesn't cost anything to sit on a warrant but you have write a check if you want to exercise one.

     

    Regardless of when the warrant holders choose to take profits, savage selling behavior is less likely because there are no true-up provisions in the warrants and driving the price down after exercise directly reduces the holder's profit on the trade.

     

    The entire problem over the last four years has been two or more fat guys trying to leave the bar at the same time. As long as you don't have at least two jumbos fighting with each other the incentive for a single seller to act like a savage is almost non-existent because retail sellers are not effective competition.

     

    Occam's Razor> Everybody is sick and tired of the daily beat-down we've suffered for the last four years. I believe the last of our tormenters has been hauled away in a body bag, but the fear that management is actively searching for even sleazier new investors runs deep despite claims that, "We don't want to pee on that electric fence again."

     

    You've been a valuable contributor for a long time and I'd hate to see you step away, but if you decide to take a mental health break, please remember that you'll be greeted with open arms upon your return.
    19 May, 05:02 AM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (835) | Send Message
     
    OR --- "I will be taking a break from commenting for a while. My frustrations have gotten the better of me lately and while I'm generally a very positive person..."
    ---
    I went through something similar recently, and decided to take a break for a few weeks. What I realized during this time was that after initially being a big fan of TG, and often defending him and/or giving him the benefit of the doubt on a number of issues (pendulum too far in one direction), the pendulum swung in the opposite direction, and I found myself grumbling and posting way too much about some of my angers and frustrations.

     

    I feel I've now reached a more balanced view on TG regarding both his strengths and weaknesses. His demeanor on the recent CC has made a big difference for me as well. I long thought he showed an element of disdain for his loyal shareholder base, never seeming to acknowledge the losses and frustrations we've endured, and seemingly not feeling he owed us explanations about unfulfilled initiatives that many of us had based important investment decisions on.

     

    But his shout out to us on the last CC, which I felt was delivered with a sincere appreciation, and even a touch of humility, has made a big difference for me, not only in how I view him, but also how I view Axion’s prospects at this time. I think his subtle shift in demeanor is at least in part due to his seeing things finally beginning to turn in a meaningful way, and that we’re at long last going to start to turn some important corners. — Hopefully, this is a realistic appraisal, and not letting the pendulum swing too far back the other way again. :)

     

    I always appreciate your posts, and look forward to you rejoining us again when the time's right.
    19 May, 01:17 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    that was fast.
    16 May, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    But the race is still on. There was an earlier poll I conducted about "who" would be the next to ride - trucker or engineer. I had another poll before that one about where would our "revenue path" come from, IIRC.

     

    Pretty-sounding predictions from our newly-anointed clearly significant prophet (CSP) about the NS999 getting some sun in the first week of June!!!??? WHAAAAT?

     

    So we're going to have a new poll ... incoming monkey wrench alert ... to give all us railroaders another chance to make yourself heard. ;)

     

    The "significant path forward to profits" poll seeks to report Axionista opinion on which SuperCab sector the next news will come from that results in the first 100% jump in share price from this date forward.
    16 May, 05:56 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    LIKE for Trucks.
    16 May, 05:57 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    LIKE for trains.
    16 May, 05:57 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    LIKE for CUBEs.
    16 May, 05:57 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Since you seem to get a kick out of polls, you might want to check out this website.

     

    http://polldaddy.com

     

    They offer both free and paid accounts. I've used Polldaddy a couple times and it's pretty slick.
    16 May, 05:59 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    My Dad wasn't the first to tell me I was a bit of a smart-aleck. Yeah, he actually said it like that when I was about 3. Later it morphed.

     

    We just celebrated his 90th yesterday.

     

    But this is the only place I "conduct polls". It's not like the census; it's completely Libertarian, I mean voluntary.
    16 May, 06:06 PM Reply Like
  • GambleAholic
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    edmund, as a train guy, you must love being a conductor! ;^)
    16 May, 06:50 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2129) | Send Message
     
    A big thanks to APH and Axionistas from Antalya, Turkey, where I am motorcycle touring. I was not able to listen in on the call today, but was able to read about it here on my ipad in near real time as I got ready for dinner and was able to celebrate the good news with friends and family.
    16 May, 05:26 PM Reply Like
  • Treehill
    , contributor
    Comments (105) | Send Message
     
    While you are there you should drop in to Side, just a bit east of Antalya on the coast. That's where my avatar is from. I'm sure you'll have a good time touring over there.
    16 May, 06:38 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    There is a very good chance that Paul nee' Saul of Tarsus spoke at the ruins your avatar memorializes.

     

    I once did a half-year Bible study for my local church on the region and the "Letters" ascribed to him from those travels.

     

    Cool avatar, Treehill.
    16 May, 08:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8830) | Send Message
     
    2015 Chevy Spark EV gets battery overhaul after only a year on the market

     

    "GM has clearly put some effort into redesigning the battery system to reduce its size and cost without sacrificing range. Evidently the new LG Chem cells are superior to the outgoing A123 cells, but no doubt much of the improvements come from an increased depth of discharge window that utilizes more of the battery’s capacity. Another notable change, an increased final drive ratio, also could have helped maintain rated range.

     

    http://bit.ly/1gbCIm1
    16 May, 06:51 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (717) | Send Message
     
    One question I would have like to heard on the conference call would have been:
    "Given that Axion is in need of another place to manufacture the negative electrodes, and that I have seen states and municipalities given out, sometimes Millions, to pie in the sky companies to do business in there area, I was wondering if you are pursuing any community development dollars out there? It could even be a way to keep the lower margin toll contract income flowing."
    16 May, 07:50 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Axion's electrode fabrication is done in a separate facility on Greenridge road about a half mile from the battery plant. The building has ample space for up to 10 electrode fabrication lines if it's properly laid out. So while expansion will be needed someday, that day is not imminent.
    16 May, 08:09 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (717) | Send Message
     
    John, I was under the impression that BMW insisting that it happen before they would start to put PcBs in their cars.
    i.e. no single point of failure in the supply lines.
    17 May, 08:16 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    I would like to know who is testing the activated carbon before use. And what testing and criteria are involved.
    16 May, 08:42 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Axion buys high quality activated carbon from Kuray Chemical and I'm certain it runs several QC tests before use. It may also do some additional processing in house. The chance that Axion will ever answer questions on core IP issues like carbon testing, processing and specifications is vanishingly remote. At last years stockholders meeting I asked if I could see the carbon room and got a friendly but firm "no way in hell."
    16 May, 08:53 PM Reply Like
  • alsobirdman
    , contributor
    Comments (362) | Send Message
     
    Speaking of stockholders' meeting, IIRC it was in September last year. That month is shaping up to be my busiest travel month of this year but being that I think we should have plenty to celebrate by then, I sure hope I can make it and meet up with some of you to raise a glass of our favorite cheer.
    16 May, 09:09 PM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (501) | Send Message
     
    Last year's meeting was late. In the previous year the meeting took place in July or early August I believe and I believe that will also be the case this year.
    16 May, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (652) | Send Message
     
    Al, Axion has not published a date for the annual meeting but the RS proposal filing states that the meeting would be held no later than Sept.

     

    Near the top of page 4
    "Our Board of Directors unanimously adopted the Proposal and recommends that the stockholders vote FOR the approval of the Proposal. The board of directors has decided to seek written consent rather than calling a special meeting of stockholders, in order to eliminate the costs and management time involved in holding a special meeting. Written consents are being solicited from all of our stockholders of record pursuant to Section 228(a) of the Delaware General Corporation Law. The Company anticipates holding an annual meeting no later than September 2014 in keeping with the 2013 timeframe of its Annual Meeting. In order to comply with its requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Company has included the information in this Consent Solicitation which it would have provided in a Schedule 14A for an Annual Meeting or in Part III of its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013."

     

    http://bit.ly/1vhDSRp

     

    16 May, 11:35 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Edmund - ditto for JP's comment.

     

    I speculated what happens in the SSCC (Super Secret Carbon Chamber; my name, not Axion's). Is it something incredibly innovative and brilliant? Or is it something trivially mundane, like spray the carbon with WD-40, so that anyone could make bio-carbon batteries?

     

    I have no idea. They wouldn't let me see it. Vani says he has not seen it, too.
    16 May, 09:00 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    I have little doubt that the "carbon room" is where the chemical activation of the Kuraray carbon is being done. This is how carbon gets electroactivated. The exact details took a long time to develop. I think the Russians knew the carbon processing was the essential step.

     

    The patent describing the process is core IP and vague; there does not appear to me to be any unexpected formulation components, so I would say that it was an involved and evolved multi-variable process using relatively mundane procedures, the specifics of which are the key. Of course, the same goes for the formulation of Coke; after they took the coke out, of course.

     

    http://bit.ly/1isFinL Method of fabrication of modified activated carbon

     

    EXCERPT below for those interested:

     

    Closest to the present invention from technical point of view is the method developed by the I. A. Kuzin's group, comprising treatment of the carbon with concentrated nitric acid, washing and drying (see I. A. Tarkovskaya, “Oxidized Carbon”, Kiev, 1981 pp. 123-132 and 164, in Russian). This method is considered as a prototype of the invention hereafter. Some drawbacks of the prototype can be pointed out: its unstable electric properties and loses of electric capacity due to both changes in the pore structure and formation of considerable amount of soluble organic compounds in carbon bulk. Furthermore, high concentrations of nitric acid cause valuable destruction and loses of the carbonaceous material.

     

    The goal of the present invention is to obtain activated carbon having high electric capacity and stable electric characteristics.

     

    This goal is achieved by the method proposed, comprising treatment of the activated carbon with 1.0-10.0% alkali solution, followed by treatment with 0.2-10.0% nitric acid, washing and drying. After drying, the carbon can be annealed at 135-950° C. in inert or slightly oxidative medium or at 135-350° C. in air, steam or exhaust gases atmosphere. In addition, washing of the carbon following the acid treatment can be done using ammonia solution up to pH 4-10, and the annealing after drying is applied in inert or exhaust gases atmosphere up to 135-950° C.

     

    The difference of the present invention from the prototype is in the alkali solution (1.0-10.0%) treatment prior to nitric acid one, while the preferred concentration of the nitric acid is 0.2-10.0%. Moreover, the carbon after drying can be annealed up to either 135-950° C. in inert or mildly oxidative atmosphere or 135-350° C. in air, steam or exhaust gases atmosphere. Acid treatment can be followed by washing in ammonia solution up to pH 4-10 and subsequent annealing up to 135-950° C. in inert or exhaust gases atmosphere.

     

    To the best of the inventors' knowledge, no such method has been described so far in the literature for fabrication of electrodes for capacitors.
    17 May, 07:26 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, Edmund. From the patent information, it evident there is a lot of room for proprietary information not revealed that keeps the process valuable. Seems quite appropriate for Axion to keep nosy people like me out of there. :)
    17 May, 07:42 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (738) | Send Message
     
    I'm jealous of the people who have waited till now to buy in.
    No waiting for years for "paint to dry".
    The price is still dirt cheap and the rocket's fuse is finally lit.
    16 May, 09:13 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2340) | Send Message
     
    Green,

     

    Why do you suspect the "fuse" is lit. NS news has been around for many years and it's obvious that they will move very very slow and cautiously. Heck, I doubt they commision more than few more locos and then that will takes many months before delivery and months more before install and then many months again of testing. You get the picture.

     

    Or do you think these Cube orders that so far come in once a year or so will pay the bills? At this point the market wants to see some meat before the pps and market cap can surge. Epower is the best bet for a fast mover but that's asking a lot of a tiny private company with BIG dreams. imho
    17 May, 12:07 AM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    zook, remember the price action when Axion announced NS' purchase order for the 999's batteries? IIRC, it was about +$0.08 from $0.30 to $0.38 intraday. A follow on for a couple more locos would be huge.
    17 May, 01:27 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13444) | Send Message
     
    The PR value is much larger than the sale of a few thousand batteries. Axion would move from an invisible nonentity to a bright media spotlight very quickly. And the drama of a functioning PbC locomotive pulling large numbers of freight cars around the yards will attract new investors, retail and institutional.

     

    When one of the toy train manufacturers produces a perfect little replica, perhaps even powered by batteries, with the dramatic paint scheme... I will buy one.
    17 May, 04:38 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2340) | Send Message
     
    isthi,

     

    Sure it might add a nickel or so if a few more Cubes get moved; but I'm looking for a 2 bits type move someday.

     

    Yup; for those who bought near 10 cents and want to exit at 20 hat'll maybe happen on an NS siting. But in my mind this should be a bagger or bust type stock and needs more than one and two off sales at this stage.

     

    The next placement and uplist results loom large and likely will be on the front burner before any further sales announcements come from TG. I'm not even sure if placement will wait until the next CC; TG wont want to get caught with his pants down again like last year.
    17 May, 04:40 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Given:

     

    The near-stealth past of Axion.
    Oudated, inadequate, and inaccurate website.
    Total absence of social media and marketing.
    Limited charisma and stage presence of the CEO, coupled with no brand ambassador.
    The minimal to non-existent brand presence in the industry.
    The total lack of a consumer brand.
    The near total lack of an investment brand outside of the Axionistas.
    etc.

     

    Even if with a few locomotives running around, would Axion pull of any successful PR beyond railroad groupies?
    17 May, 06:26 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    I think any CEO would look great taking a ride in the very attractively-painted cab of a new Norfolk Southern all-electric supercabattery-powered locomotive.

     

    Especially if the CEO happened to be the guy whose company makes the aforementioned supercabatteries.

     

    That's what I hope to see. Just having Tom on the podium would be great, though.
    17 May, 07:37 AM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    My impression is that the process for adoption of green technology is accelerating. I believe that 2015 will be the year where green technologies will truly explode and axion is perfectly positioned to take advantage of that. In my view both nsc and epower will accelerate enormously in 2015.
    the problem will be keep up with demand
    17 May, 08:17 AM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (781) | Send Message
     
    Triple,

     

    I thought I heard that Lionel has one out or maybe is bringing one out!
    17 May, 09:54 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    I thought I'd seen someone already link to it; this is as close as Lionel has gotten:

     

    http://bit.ly/1jp7I2z
    17 May, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (131) | Send Message
     
    "Green technology' ...hmm...real or fake green technologies? Fake green technologies have been exploding (in the taxpayers' faces) for years - sending astounding amounts of money down the drain.

     

    What is "green" anyway? I just like the idea of increased efficiency... "Eco" as in 'eco'nomically advantageous.
    Axion is so unusual and hard to understand perhaps because it is unique and real.
    18 May, 12:39 AM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    Partly I do agree with you, but we always forget that tax breaks and subsidies for green technologies are simply a way not to raise a carbon tax.
    Think about this, science seems to agree that carbon dioxide emission are creating damage to everybody; not only health care problems but also extreme weather events etc...

     

    If this is the case all emitters of carbon must pay for the damage they create (it is only fair) so either carbon emissions are taxed and the return is used to eliminate the damage (and this will be VERY expensive) OR as a palliative tax breaks are given to less polluting energy forms.

     

    Theoretically both must be done, using one source to fund the other, but politically this is impossible.

     

    It is no use to say that a carbon central can produce energy at (put any amount) and that solar (or wind) can only produce at (put any amount) when the carbon production produces emissions that create a damage GREATER than the raw cost of wind or solar production.

     

    I understand that very often public money is badly spent (rarely government spend wisely) and that is very difficult to correctly weight the damage that 1 ton of dioxide produces, but something has to be done. To say that tax breaks do not produce a viable business model or that the new EPA regulation are creating a crisis in the energy matrix making a lot of central uneconomical is only a way to fool oneself hiding from reality.
    18 May, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    While its a decidedly unpopular view, I'm a fatalist when it comes to C02 emissions and their potential impact on the global climate because the dynamic is not going to change as long as we continue to see geometric growth in the global population.

     

    http://bit.ly/17fnZiE

     

    As long as many billions in developing economies are burning high carbon energy sources because it's better than freezing in the dark, the vain and inconsequential efforts of a few hundred million in advanced economies will be little more than spit in the river.
    18 May, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    MicMac: And just recently I heard we are in a moderate period of a great "Ice Age".

     

    Maybe we really need all the carbon in the atmosphere to keep from freezing our butts off in the next 10,000 years? ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 12:36 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    "If this is the case all emitters of carbon must pay for the damage they create (it is only fair) so either carbon emissions are taxed and the return is used to eliminate the damage (and this will be VERY expensive) OR as a palliative tax breaks are given to less polluting energy forms."

     

    Interpreted literally that comment argues for imposition of a head tax on people, pets, livestock, etc. with no exemptions since all respirate CO2 and emit CH4.
    18 May, 01:06 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1476) | Send Message
     
    D-inv> Don't forget that athletes and physically active people should pay more since they consume more oxygen creating more CO2. Maybe we could meter people's lungs?
    18 May, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    R.A.: "... athletes and physically active people should pay more since ..."

     

    OTOH, they should have, overall reduced healthcare cost impact on our newly nationalized and mandated healthcare system, so they should get some kind of rebate? Maybe a "carbon-healthy" rebate? And if they don't pay taxes, we send 'em a check in appreciation.

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 01:41 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Seldom reported, but domestic livestock is a far larger source of CH4 emissions than all other anthropogenic sources combined. Meat for humans (their breathing, feeding, slaughtering, refrigeration, and transportation) is a significant source of CO2, but I do not remember the % off hand.

     

    from wikipedia: A report from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) states that the livestock sector is "responsible for 18% of greenhouse gas emissions".[57] The report concludes, unless changes are made, the damage thought to be linked to livestock may more than double by 2050, as demand for meat increases. http://bit.ly/1hVHfV0
    18 May, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    Livestock (cows farting) and rice cultivation are the main source of methane (that is a greenhouse gas).

     

    Difficult to make everybody a riceless vegetarian :-)

     

    JP: the growth in population is not anymore geometrical, I believe that population must top in 2050 approx.

     

    D-inv: the tax must be calculated on weight, heavier people produce more CO2, with a correction for eating habits; for example beans eaters must be taxed twice as much :-)

     

    Production of energy from carbon may still be considered a main source.
    18 May, 03:30 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    NOT ONE DIME MORE! The entire carbon tax issue is just another powergrab by the State. Since we are intent on taking away their ability to conduct their highly profitable drug war, they are naturally looking for another to cling to. The Carbon War holds great promise in this regard. Everyone makes carbon dioxide every minute of their life. If they can just get this Carbon War started with a little tax, it will grow, they know it, they have experience in these things. When it comes to the State, a vote for more is a vote for more war. "National security" and "general welfare" are the two most over-abused phrases in the political lexicon.
    18 May, 03:36 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    The Meat Tax is coming!
    18 May, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2768) | Send Message
     
    micmac1
    "Think about this, science seems to agree that carbon dioxide emission are creating damage to everybody; not only health care problems but also extreme weather events etc... "

     

    Ignoring weather :
    What evidence that CO2 is causing "damage to everybody"?
    What "health care problems"?
    18 May, 03:45 PM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    froggey77: You are right CO2 in itself is not prejudicial but sulfur compounds and particulates (that are always associated with carbon burning and a thousand other substance that are associated with petrol) are for sure damaging.

     

    Edmund: I am not advocating a carbon tax, I agree the income will be badly spent. What I am trying to say is that tax breaks for "green" energy are NOT to be considered negative in themselves.
    When these tax breaks are used to make a Tesla cheaper they are badly allocated but they are the only balanced way for a government to push green energy without the enormous economic impact that other fairer measures, like that carbon tax, entail.
    18 May, 05:06 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    One of my more surprising experiences in the last 20 years came last winter when I was in ePower's shop and Jay fired up the Cummins 6.7L diesel engine with the 2010 emissions package. The darned thing ran for about 5 minutes and the only thing I could smell was the old shop dog.

     

    Since then I've made a point of deliberately sniffing the exhaust of late model cars (and drawing some pretty strange looks in parking lots). The experience has taught me that my old knowledge has nothing to do with today's reality.

     

    Give it a try for yourself. You might just be shocked by the fumes and noxious odors that no longer exist.

     

    It was enough to make me remember Mark Twain's wisdom. "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so."
    18 May, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • futurecartsla
    , contributor
    Comments (326) | Send Message
     
    "Since then I've made a point of deliberately sniffing the exhaust of late model cars "

     

    WHAT THE???!

     

    and just when I thought it couldn't get any more weird THIS:

     

    "Give it a try for yourself. "

     

    ROFL!!!
    18 May, 05:27 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    That attitude is guaranteed to keep you in a blissful state of perpetual ignorance.
    18 May, 05:29 PM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    JP, someone said to me that in Mexico City the air from the exhaust is cleaner than the air in the exhaust, still pollution from sulfur compounds and particulate are one of the main problem in energy production (ask a Chinese)
    18 May, 05:39 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    The sulfur problems come from burning coal in generating plants that don't have adequate emissions controls. Hell, an EV in China is dirtier than a car with a modern internal combustion engine.

     

    While I have empathy for the entire world, I do not for one second believe individual choices in the US are going to make a bit of difference when it comes to offsetting or correcting the collective suboptimal decisions of billions in China and other emerging economies.
    18 May, 05:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    Shoot John! You don't have to get all that radical. Just get in city traffic behind an older, and especially if out-of-tune, car when the air is stagnant or gently wafting you direction.

     

    The stink is *very* noticeable and obnoxious.

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 05:54 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    "D-inv: the tax must be calculated on weight, heavier people produce more CO2, with a correction for eating habits; for example beans eaters must be taxed twice as much :-)"

     

    :-) Dunno about the corrections for eating habits here in the U.S., micmac1. Any proposal to tax individuals would generate considerable animosity in and of itself as the government attempting to take more than it is already. Proposing to tax beans eaters more than other persons would generate massive outcry about insensitivity to plight of the poor, accusations of
    -- racial discrimination against hispanics (some people in some regions of the U.S. have been known to refer to Mexican-Americans as 'bean eaters'),
    -- discrimination against vegetarians,
    -- subsidizing meat producers,
    -- government picking winners and losers,
    -- etc.

     

    In serious vein, many knowledgeable people question purported dangers of rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and human understanding of the carbon cycle or of any correlation between rising CO2 and severe weather events. It has not escaped notice that global average temperatures are virtually unchanged in over 17 years by some measures while atmospheric CO2 concentration has increased by more than 9%.
    18 May, 06:08 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    I didn't say older HTL. Those vehicles are nearing the end of their useful lives and will rapidly fade from relevance. If you want to understand what's happening today, you need to check out the systems they're using today.

     

    While I haven't seen documentary proof, Jay claims that in the City of the Angels the exhaust from our 2010 compliant Cummins Diesel will be cleaner than the air that goes through the intake manifold.
    18 May, 06:12 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    D-Inv: You overlooked the biggest obstacle to taxing bean eaters - the lobbyists for the bean growers.

     

    Of course, they don't *themselves* eat beans when preparing to work with the staffers and congress people to craft the legislation, tax loopholes, exemptions, subsidies, ...

     

    Not only would it reduce their chances of extended meetings and success, but it would mask the stink that already emanates from those hallowed halls as the normal course of business.

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 06:21 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4428) | Send Message
     
    >D-inv ... The biggest problem with CO2 levels rising (and I don't care where you might think it is coming from) is the problem of Sequestration. Without it things can't get anything but worse.

     

    The Earth has basically 2 scrubber systems, Forests & the Oceans. The developing world, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, and others are deforesting at an amazing rates. At rates driven by expanding populations and demand from First World nations for cheap, abundant resources. With decreasing forested areas that leaves the oceans to do the job and it is doing so quite well ... but with some not so good consequences. Higher acidity and warmer temperatures where they weren't before will over time change wind & weather patterns. The biggest danger to humans is if things get to the point that we find the tundra & polar seas warming to depth enough to begin releasing methane hydrates.

     

    I know it is a huge problem & maybe expensive beyond imagining but, personally, I see the problem as a societal expense worth trying to find an answer to because I see the the First World nations as the ones driving demand and possess the wealth to act as good Stewards and lead the Developing world down a less detrimental than we took ... or just accept the next Extinction Event is inevitable and soon.

     

    It is just good sense to limit the harm humanity can & will do to itself. Extreme Conservation can be good business &, maybe, new industry. Biggest problem science has is that the system is not well enough understood now and there is a lot of resistance to putting the effort into understanding.

     

    There is still the good chance that Nature will do the job on its own, but for now it's Party & Profit On. Still it would be good to have the knowledge and systems for some portion of an advanced society to survive. Doomsday Preppers are going to fill the bill. When its gone ... what then?
    18 May, 07:17 PM Reply Like
  • froggey77
    , contributor
    Comments (2768) | Send Message
     
    You'd never get a politician to vote for a tax on people who talk more.
    18 May, 07:24 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4428) | Send Message
     
    >froggey77 ... Politicians do what they are told to do. Money is what tells them what to do. We get the privilege of indirectly voting for their sponsors and they will tax those that aren't their sponsors ... like you. As an example, here in Texas highways are a big problem because of growth. We somehow, as society, don't have the money to build or repair them but we can build new private/public ones that if you were to commute on them daily works out to $12.00 to $15.00 a gallon because $0.12 a gallon rise in taxes is unacceptable.

     

    The toll road users are the lucky ones because our 30,000 mile Farm to Market system is going back washboard dirt.
    18 May, 07:39 PM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    D-Inv
    >In serious vein, many knowledgeable people question purported dangers of rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and human understanding of the carbon cycle or of any correlation between rising CO2 and severe weather events. It has not escaped notice that global average temperatures are virtually unchanged in over 17 years by some measures while atmospheric CO2 concentration has increased by more than 9%.

     

    I am not a climatologist, may be CO2 emissions are not detrimental, most scientist believe they are but the we do not understand enough to have 100% certainty but... do you want to bet?
    Better do you want your sons and nephews to bet? The risk is huge the reward of ignoring the problem limited....
    18 May, 07:51 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    John, Kudos on collecting scientific data. It is amazing how efficient and non-polluting automobiles have become.
    18 May, 09:10 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Edmund - I assume TG might get a good shot of him smiling from the cab of 999, and hang it in his office.

     

    However, I do not see that image having any impact whatsoever on sales.
    18 May, 10:30 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4428) | Send Message
     
    >Rick Krementz ... I certainly would like to see that picture hanging on the wall and I agree that it would have any impact of sales. I'm looking for a demonstration of potential. As much as I'd like to see sales and a viable manufacturer emerge, Potential seems to move more stocks than sales do and at the moment I'm looking for return of capital than return on capital.
    18 May, 10:57 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2494) | Send Message
     
    "I'm looking for return of capital [rather] than return on capital."

     

    I suspect many people that are not on Axion's payroll are looking for the same thing.
    18 May, 11:03 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    DRich, micmac1 ... What I glean from readings of "global warming/climate change" related research papers, IPCC reports, internet blogs, etc. is that a true consensus likely exists regarding absorption and retention of heat by CO2 and other 'greenhouse' gases. And, we should all be appreciative of that physical reality as earth would be a much colder environment without it. But consensus pretty much ends there regarding CO2.

     

    The probability of scientific consensus on the proposition that rising atmospheric CO2 concentration poses a clear and present danger to humanity or to increasing incidence or severity of extreme weather is absolute zero. http://bit.ly/1n8AEOQ attests to that reality.

     

    My readings of climate and environment related literature do point to particulates as a significant health risk, at minimum. Readings also lend strong support to anthropogenic contributions to climate change and ocean environment degradation through land use and changes thereto.

     

    To me, reservation of natural resources for future generations is a far, far more compelling argument for conservation than is risk of CO2 driven climate change.
    19 May, 03:22 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (869) | Send Message
     
    >>It has not escaped notice that global average temperatures are virtually unchanged in over 17 years by some measures <<

     

    Micmac, that simply is not true. The Earth is steadily warming. Heat transfer to oceans can mask air temperature rises in some areas, but the warming trend marches on. http://bit.ly/1qPgqv7
    19 May, 10:26 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    " >>It has not escaped notice that global average temperatures are virtually unchanged in over 17 years by some measures <<

     

    Micmac, that simply is not true."

     

    ngs, I am not going to debate the issue with you on this forum. I said "unchanged in over 17 years by some measures". SOME not ALL. The eighth and ninth charts down the page (Remote Sensing Systems - Microwave Sounding Unit measured troposphere and lower stratosphere temperature anomalies) at http://bit.ly/1sLGra8 illustrate and document my point.

     

    Observation. I have not found the skepticalscience.com blog objective about much of anything and seldom visit there.
    19 May, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    In general, we are 18,000 years into a warn period which generally lasts 20,000 years, this along with an 80,000 ice age makes up a 100,000 year cycle which has occurred for the last 6.5 million years. Which coincides with time there has been a land mass at the south pole.
    20 May, 07:54 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    On the same basis, everyone who has a tree, shrubs, flowers, green algae or grass should receive income for the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere.
    20 May, 07:58 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    But you leave out another major source of CO2 production, the oxidation of any carbine based material not associated with the internal combustion engine nor energy (steam production), nor breathing by all animals including man. The burning of vegetative material from natural causes and the decay (oxidation) of all vegetative and animal material.
    20 May, 08:12 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    I would agree that we do need to reduce SO2 and other particulates from using " fossil " which we can do at a reasonable cost with today's technology. But that does not seem to be the point of this exercise in government control nor "scientific" study.
    20 May, 08:19 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    I smile every time I see contrails in the sky when the surface temperatures are "warm". You only see contrails when the temperature at which the plane is flying is below freezing. I see contrails every day from the planes leaving Seattle going east. As the crow flies, we are 80 to 90 miles east of the Seattle Airport so they have not yet reached cruising altitude.
    20 May, 08:39 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (350) | Send Message
     
    From the CC,

     

    "In addition, this week ePower also advised Axion that they received notice of issuance from the US Patent Office confirming their foundation patent for engine dominant series electric hybrid drivetrain was approved for issuance."

     

    As an ePower investor, I'm excited about this news. How much of an impediment does such a patent provide against a larger player trying to get into the series hybrid truck business?
    17 May, 07:56 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Series electric drive has been a dominant railroad technology for decades and is well into the public domain. There are other companies that offer series hybrid drivetrains for medium and heavy duty vehicles including Wrightspeed and BAE Systems, which has a great web presentation on how their system for transit buses works.

     

    http://bit.ly/1lxOraR

     

    The major differences in ePower's drivetrain are overall system power, which is much higher, the way they use the energy storage system, which ePower limits to acceleration, climbing modest grades and capturing regenerative braking, and the methodology for combining power from the generator with power from the batteries, which is absolutely unique.

     

    The heart of ePower's control system is a device called an AC Vector Drive. AC Vector Drives have been used in industry for decades to control high speed assembly lines, but nobody ever though about using them in transportation.

     

    Jay learned about AC Vector Drives 20 years ago when he was working with a manufacturer of steel building studs and asked "how the heck do you stop that stud line without creating a steel spaghetti bowl?" The answer was their AC vector drive.

     

    In a typical vector drive installation, AC power from the grid is fed into the drive and converted to DC power. For normal line operations the drive converts the DC power back into AC power and sends it to the drive motors. To stop the line, the drive sends the DC power directly to brake motors without converting it back into AC power. Since DC motors have much higher torque than AC motors, they can instantly stop everything from the rotating steel coils to slitters and stud forming systems.

     

    A flash of inspiration came when Jay began to wonder whether he could connect a generator to the AC input port, a battery pack to the DC output port and a drive motor to the AC output port to create a simple power control system for electric vehicles. His basic idea was that he could use the vector drive to combine AC power from a generator with DC power from the batteries, and then convert the combined power from both sources back into AC power for the drive motor. He also wondered whether he could take regen power from the AC drive motor and feed it back into the vector drive for conversion into DC power to recharge the batteries.

     

    The vector drive engineers Jay asked about the concept told him that trying to use the DC output port and the AC output port as bidirectional circuits would destroy the drive. Jay was not convinced and decided the only way to satisfy his curiosity would be to buy a small vector drive and test the theory. It turned out that Jay was right. You can use a vector drive to mix power from a generator and power from a battery pack and use the combined power stream in a drive motor.

     

    This unique use of an AC Vector drive to perform functions it was not designed to perform is the meat of ePower's patent. The end result is a mud simple control system that lets the generator and the batteries manage themselves. If the drive motor demands more power than the generator can deliver, the voltage drops and the batteries automatically kick in to fill the gap. If the generator produces more power than the drive motor needs or the drive motor goes into regen mode, the vector drive sends the surplus power to the batteries.
    17 May, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    There are several ways to skin the power control cat for a series hybrid drivetrain. It appears that ePower's approach is the simplest, cheapest and most elegant. Since the AC Vector Drive experts all told Jay the idea couldn't work, the patent should be quite strong.
    17 May, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (350) | Send Message
     
    Thank you, John for that concise, informative reply. It sounds like the IP protection is quite robust and I look forward to coming updates on progress with the trucks.
    17 May, 09:39 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    As in Axion Power investor I'm wondering if issuance of the patent will accelerate onset of ePower hybrid truck test marketing.
    17 May, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    I've been talking about ePower's company owned fleet for months, but I don't know that people understand that each demonstration is the beginning of a sales cycle.

     

    We don't expect any potential customer to believe our fuel economy numbers. They will, however, believe their own experience. If a fleet owner uses one of our tractors to haul freight for a couple weeks and likes the performance, he's going to want to talk about next steps – as in "how do I get one or several of these tractors to see how they'll work in my business over the long term?"

     

    Our answer will be "We can either sell you repower conversions on trucks that you're getting ready to overhaul anyway, or we can lease you one of our demonstrators for a year at a cost that includes a reasonable rent for the tractor plus half the fuel savings."

     

    A small operator might very well decide that a lease will work best for him, but a large fleet operator will need several tractors to collect enough hard data to make a fleet-wide implementation decision. The only way a fleet is going to get several of our tractors is if they buy them.

     

    When a fleet operator says I'd like to start with a five or ten truck test fleet, we'll ask him to send us the tractors one at a time and to send a crew of mechanics with each tractor. We'll do the conversion using his crew so that each tractor he sends for a repower gets returned with a crew that (a) knows how to maintain it, and (b) knows how to do another repower conversion in their own shop by simply ordering a kit from us.

     

    For the first two or three weeks in June the sleeper cab will be in the hands of a local independent trucker who has agreed to be our guinea pig and haul freight with the prototypes. That will give us good baseline fuel economy data and help us identify weaknesses. If there have to be breakdowns, we'd rather have a friend at the wheel than a critic. Once the tractor has logged a couple weeks of problem free operation, we'll feel more confident putting it in the hands of an operator who might be less forgiving.

     

    By the end of June we want to have the sleeper cab in the hands of the FedEx contractor who sold us the day cab. He only owns eight tractors, but he uses them all to service his contract with FedEx. Once again we'll leave the tractor with this operator for two or three weeks and let him use it hauling freight for FedEx.

     

    When we've logged a few weeks of operation with our local trucker and the FedEx contractor, we'll be ready to put the sleeper cab into the hands of a local company that uses 13,000 tractors to haul freight in a hub and spoke network that covers most of the US.

     

    As soon as the day cab is finished, it will start working its way through the same cycle with the same initial players.

     

    This is all about marketing. Our local trucker will draw crowds every time he stops for fuel or lunch because there are big kudos from driving this kind of prototype. Our FedEx contractor will be doing the same thing and spreading the word to other FedEx contract haulers. When our tractors start showing up at FedEx depots twice daily word will migrate upstream rapidly. If our big fleet operator likes the tractor, all hell's gonna break loose.

     

    Today we're planning to build a fleet of 10 ePower demonstrators and start cycling them through the hands of interested fleet owners and owner operators. If our early demonstrations start turning into orders from customers we'll push the demonstrators back and devote our staff and resources to filling orders that make us money rather than costing us money.

     

    We get calls on a regular basis from operators and leasing companies who are very interested in finding out for themselves. If we get the performance we expect, I'm convinced that ramping our operations to meet demand will be a far bigger challenge than creating demand in the first place.

     

    I keep saying that we want to steal a page from the Tesla playbook and build a reservation list. Every name on that list makes it easier for me to discuss our growth trajectory and financing needs with financiers. By happy accident, every name on that list will also be backlog for Axion.
    17 May, 02:42 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Sounds good, JP. I'll be interested in hearing the results.
    17 May, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • KillaCycle
    , contributor
    Comments (523) | Send Message
     
    "Space-vector" modulation what you are referring to.
    http://bit.ly/1gd87V5

     

    Nothing new. Around 2002 it became popular and is used in most high-end AC drives today. All commercial EV's and HEV's use space-vector modulation. This includes: Tesla, the Prius, Leaf, etc.

     

    The alternatives are the V-Hz (less computationally intense, used in smaller, cheaper AC drives) and the very primate "six step". Here is a general link that talks about all the AC drives:
    http://bit.ly/1gd87V7

     

    Note that BAE's application for the series hybrid configuration is a city bus, not an over the highway truck. The difference is that in a city bus application regen braking occurs very frequently. The bus driver is accelerating and braking constantly. This is why BAE has chosen the series hybrid specifically for this application, and has elected not to use it for an over-the-road freight application.

     

    They have run computer models and these show that this specific application is what makes sense for a series hybrid drive.

     

    This all is well known in the industry, by the way.
    17 May, 02:56 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2096) | Send Message
     
    Hi JP,
    I know you know, but others here may not. Word of mouth travels fast in the trucking industry. Freight isn't the only thing that travels coast to coast in 3 days. Drivers talk on the CB radio constantly with road acquaintances and friends as they drive to help stay focused and not be hypnotized by the white line.
    Truck stops are gossip and news centers. If something works that saves money and is cool, watch out. If the drivers know something, their management will know just about as quick. Other than driving, talking is what drivers do best.:-)
    17 May, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • dance621
    , contributor
    Comments (163) | Send Message
     
    Great overview JP. Fingers crossed the bugs are few and easily fixed. Can I ask what bugs, if any, you are most concerned about?

     

    Also based on this timeline there is the potential that by the end of the year some orders might come in. what sort of capacity of order can you handle? One kit a week? And what steps wojld be needed to increase capacity if suddenly you were getting PLUG forklift level orders of a few thousand a year?
    18 May, 05:23 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    The bugs we worry about are the ones we haven't seen yet. We've resolved the problems we know about, but the unknowns will be an ever-present concern until we've accumulated millions of miles of experience. Human beings are very clever when it comes to abusing their stuff and truckers are a definitely human. As customers identify problems, we'll need to refine and modify our system to resolve those problems and avoid them in the future.

     

    For the rest of this year we'll be thrilled with a tractor a month, particularly if some of those tractors are for customers and involve training customer crews to install the drivetrain. Frankly, we don't want a big contract until we get some serious mileage under our belt.

     

    As we expand our staff and start training customer crews to install our planned repower kits, our business can ramp rapidly. I just want to make sure it ramps rationally and we don't bite off more than we can chew.
    18 May, 06:42 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2387) | Send Message
     
    >JP: will ePower be receiving data from your loaners automatically, or does it take your customers doing something repeatedly for you to get it?

     

    Are you favoring early customers that operate close to your headquarters? If not, will a staff member be spending a few days "on site" on each delivery?

     

    As you go through the "real life" learning phase, do you anticipate the potential need/desire to do "firmware" upgrades to various components of all previously delivered trucks? If so, will that be part of the training, or could it even be done by ePower directly and remotely?

     

    Verifying (either remotely or via a checklist) that such upgrades have been done completely and accurately (via checksums?) is worth some thought before you go chasing problems that might result from something assumed to have been done properly, but wasn't.
    18 May, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    ePower currently has a four person staff including me, and I'm pretty useless. Axion is developing a system that will send it real time battery monitoring information on our demonstrators but we are unlikely to develop proprietary data gathering or electronic upgrade systems until we get beyond the off-the-shelf component stage.

     

    When we look at our current drivetrain we see a world of upgrade possibilities that will require substantial funding to implement. We could reduce weight and get better performance from a liquid cooled or a rare earth permanent magnet generator, but that kind of upgrade will cost several hundred thousand dollars and take six months to a year of work. The same is true for drive motor and transmission upgrades. There are a ton of possibilities but each of them comes with a six digit price tag and a multi-month implementation timeline.

     

    For now our goals are to prove the performance of a bare-bones system made with off the shelf components and begin sales to customers who understand that they're buying pre-commercial prototypes. As time and resources permit we plan to refine our system with custom made components. Once the mechanical systems are as good as they can be, we'll turn our attention to fine tuning the electronics and controls.

     

    Our development plans will only be acceptable to a small percentage of our target market, but with a target market of 250,000 units a year a small percentage is all we'll be able to handle anyway.

     

    Initially we plan to focus on users who will keep the tractors within a few hundred miles of Florence because we can't afford to send hot shot teams anywhere in the country without notice. Mercifully about 80% of the nation's population is within a 500 mile radius so there's ample opportunity without going too far from home.

     

    We also plan to focus our initial sales efforts on a fairly narrow region, although our plan is to train another crew of mechanics with each customer retrofit.

     

    The big reason ePower decided to work with Keene Thummel in the early days was his pitch, "I have my own tow truck and can cope with the inevitable problems." We need a few more Keene's and we'll be set for a while.
    18 May, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Renzo - The not very satisfactory answer is "some". A big company may try to invent around the patent, or simply ignore it and fight in court. Or they may find it much cheaper (and ethical) to license it.

     

    Patents are among the most expensive area of law to litigate, and in my very amateur view it often seems the wrong person wins.

     

    However, "some" is a whole lotta bettah than "none". Definitely a positive indicator, but not an absolute wall of protection. A patent is generally always good for marketing, even if not effective in keeping out competitors.

     

    Specifically, how strong is the ePower patent? I have no idea.
    17 May, 08:23 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (738) | Send Message
     
    I think that the exclusive contract for the PcB from Axion may be a better wall of protection.
    While there are other similar uses such as cranes, that should backstop trucks.
    17 May, 09:07 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    greentongue - A challenge might be if Cummins or Caterpillar says we would like $1b of batteries annually from Axion for the next ten years. Would we have such problems!
    17 May, 10:01 AM Reply Like
  • User432382
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    So if I understood correctly, Axion sold 4 PowerCubes each capable of 500kW of frequency regulation (2MW total) for ~ $1.1 Million? I found this old Altairnano press release for a 10MW frequency regulation contract for $18 million:

     

    "Altair Nanotechnologies, Inc. (Altairnano) (NASDAQ: ALTI), announced on February 15, 2011 that it had signed a binding contract with Inversiones Energéticas, S.A. de C.V. (INE), one of El Salvador's largest electric generation utilities, to provide a turn-key 10 Megawatt ALTI-ESS advanced battery system for frequency control. The contract, valued at 18 million U.S. dollars, requires Altairnano to provide a complete turn-key installation at INE's Talnique power station, including all phases of site preparation, system installation, testing and commissioning."

     

    So it would seem the PowerCube is a bargain.

     

    http://mwne.ws/1lxNMX9
    17 May, 09:00 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    User43: " including all phases of site preparation"

     

    That could be a *big* chunk of change right there, depending on terrain, temperatures, climatic cycles, ... available infrastructure, etc.

     

    Like Rick says, not quite 1:1 comparable. Maybe "apples" to "apple orchard" would do though! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    17 May, 12:15 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1766) | Send Message
     
    User432382,
    You should also know that the "binding contract" that they had with El Salvador's largest electric company was nixed by the government's regulatory agency and, to my knowledge, the system was never shipped.
    19 May, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    LabTech: That's a significant piece of news. I hope AXPW doesn't get similar treatment elsewhere.

     

    HardToLove
    20 May, 06:54 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (738) | Send Message
     
    When you don't have extra money to buy the right people golf memberships or other "considerations", business suffers. :(
    20 May, 08:24 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    User 43 - Not quite an apples to apples comparison.

     

    Altair: turnkey, including installation and all inverters and electronics in El Salvador $18m/10MW = $1.8m/MW

     

    Axion: providing Powercubes FOB New Castle, without converters and balance of system. $1.1m/2MW = $0.6m/MW

     

    Axion may be less expensive, but to what degree not clear from information provided.
    17 May, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (649) | Send Message
     
    Rick, given the goofy nature of collaborative efforts in most companies with many people involved fighting for patent rights is the only way to go. I have to admit however that if I had the patience and courage and sole ownership of ePower there is another and very kewel way.

     

    The intermittent wiper blade was invented and patented by an individual, the design stolen by all auto manufacturers and the patent(s) infringed upon repeatedly. So long as that guy continued to fight for his patents in a "reasonable manner" his rights remained in force. When he finally assembled the right legal team with superstar muscle he received a settlement (I believe the case was never decided) of many many dollars beginning with a "B". IIRC he still receives royalties.

     

    Y'gotta admit winning mega bucks without all the associated manufacturing headaches is clearly the way to go. Let others do the work and later you sweep up the bucks.

     

    That story is to me the greatest single legal story in all federal business law history. There may be better ones, but that one is my favorite.

     

    Viva la' USA !
    17 May, 09:19 AM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    VW, is this the guy?

     

    http://tinyurl.com/ncj...

     

    if so, he has a Wikipedia page.
    17 May, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    There are a few, emphasis on "few", stories of underdogs, doing well in the patent sweepstakes. Another one is the guy who patented the blinking colon on digital clocks.

     

    Unfortunately many patents today have essentially zero market value due to the expense of defending them. They often get swept up by patent trolls such as Myhrvold, who then perform legal patent terrorism. [my bias is showing] http://bit.ly/1joUhQ8
    17 May, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    I share your bias Rick, but my experience hits closer to home. When I was a teenager my Dad and his partner Norman Lykes (as in shipping) bought a company that owned the US patent for the blow-molded one gallon plastic milk jug with an integral handle. As you can imagine, the infringement suits were too numerous to count and impossible to finance. They ultimately gave up on efforts to enforce the patent.
    17 May, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    I sympathise. If your Dad had won, you wouldn't have to spend so much time answering my posts on the APC!
    17 May, 09:57 AM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (717) | Send Message
     
    I had a fiend who invented a drug, J&J came along later and said they invented it, at level one it was clean J&J did not invent it and even admitted that they did not, but the patent judge still pushed for a compromise and J&J appealed all the way to the top losing every step of the way and even after losing just the fact that J&J made a claim, lost and backed off is still causing problem and long delays in financing and clinical trials.
    Valleywood, saw the movie, he came out the end as a multi millionaire, after a decade of hardship and losing his family after being back stabbed by Ford.
    17 May, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2658) | Send Message
     
    Ugly, but judges can be bought!
    17 May, 05:28 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (652) | Send Message
     
    Ed, to bring your post to the new APC:

     

    "TG: 'I don’t expect to have to give that report again, because our search for a new CFO candidate has gone well and progressed down to two finalists. Each is an excellent candidate and each would bring broad general knowledge and experience as well as specific skill sets to the CFO position. We expect to complete the process and name our new CFO by the end of May.'

     

    "I sure would like to have a look at the two finalists, not that I was thinking of conducting a poll or anything like that."

     

    It appears the end of May and first of June will be the potential launch point for Axion's pps.

     

    EPower will soon have definitive data as they finish upgrades to the 6 cylinder engine combo.

     

    NSC plans the first week of June for the roll out of NS 999

     

    Always chance of more news from PowerCubes

     

    New CFO selection.

     

    Once the weak stockholders drop out after the CC, there seems to be a strong case to see pps begin to rise in anticipation of news of the above potential.
    17 May, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    JP does ePower have plan for European markets? Diesel is twice as expensive in europe making ePower ROI TRULY compelling...
    Sorry if someone already asked.
    17 May, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    We're talking with a fund that wants us to build a company owned EU compliant tractor using a portion of the proceeds from their proposed investment, but there's no way to tell whether we'll ultimately come to terms.

     

    We're very excited about the market potential in Europe because their fuel costs are higher, their trucks are lighter and their speed limits are lower. While all of those factors play into the strengths of our drivetrain, the gulf between discussion and money in the bank is wide and deep. Only time will tell.
    17 May, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    Fairly soon Europeans will be carrying stuff around on their heads - and proud of it! chuckle. Hey, can we buy stock in Segway yet?
    17 May, 11:18 AM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (131) | Send Message
     
    I'm assuming an "Axion Inside" Segway wouldn't be feasible. ar!
    18 May, 01:00 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    Billion: I don't see why not. Lots of stops and starts mean regen opportunities abound. And the extra weight would help achieve stability. Now, if we could just solve the energy density problem ... ;-))

     

    OTOH, it would do even better on mildly rolling terrain with an ePower conversion! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 12:56 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    "Now, if we could just solve the energy density problem ... ;-))"

     

    Bingo. Bio-carbon is not even close to being practical for this application. (Yes, HTL, I know you know)
    18 May, 02:05 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    Perhaps at the ETA race-track it would shine.
    18 May, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2494) | Send Message
     
    GM gets spanked -

     

    http://nyti.ms/1hTzkr9

     

    "named a new vice president in charge of global product integrity"

     

    Does that mean he will be in charge of making things like their start/stop systems work?
    17 May, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Naw, just in charge of a new feel-good marketing program with "creative math" showing how much better they are, than, than, mumble...mumble, sumfin'.
    17 May, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    I get sick when I read something like GM's response. You just can not add a staff guy at headquarters to do anything. Quality has to be built in, built in the product and built in the whole organization from the janitors to the division heads.

     

    There actions are just covering up their problems with defective bandaids.

     

    Want to solve the problem? Get a new division head from outside the company, say Toyota, put the current division head of Chevy to be in charge of fixing Chevy's problems, hold him personally responsible, retroactively put all his back stock compensation and retirement on hold until it is fixed. Make sure if it is not fixed, the company will put all it legal efforts to make him personally responsible, including pressing criminal charges for the unnecessary deaths. Make sure he is in the local plants, and only in the corporate office (conference room) in Detroit one day a month. You can't solve problems in the executive dining room.
    17 May, 01:01 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    Dang, Rick. Hold someone accountable! What a novel idea!
    17 May, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • engindoc
    , contributor
    Comments (19) | Send Message
     
    In the last couple of days, I read many of the Concentrator comments during the period leading up to the conference call. I was struck by the negativity and bitterness expressed in quite a few comments. I don't recall this level of negativity around previous conference calls. I feel this is precisely what Axion stock has been waiting for. It will likely move up significantly and punish all those "nattering nabobs of negativism"...
    17 May, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2096) | Send Message
     
    Hi engine,
    The negativity is normal before a CC. Emotions run wild from a lack of news and the mind numbing, tedious exercise of watching paint dry. After a CC the emotions are buoyed for a period. Might want to check with thotdoc and SM (our local shrinks), we might be bi polar!! Take 2 PBC's and call me in the morning. ;-)
    17 May, 12:28 PM Reply Like
  • GambleAholic
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    dr engindoc, i've been reading the concentrators almost from the very beginning. i have found that overall sentiment is an actionable lagging indicator.

     

    sentiment ran high for a long time, as the stock price kept dropping.

     

    sentiment hit a low several months ago when i started buying, then we had the very nice pop to $.20. sentiment got better. then we dropped back and sentiment reached what i think is the lowest ever recently. so i've been adding again.
    17 May, 12:51 PM Reply Like
  • Alphameister
    , contributor
    Comments (1428) | Send Message
     
    Welcome Spiro Agnew!

     

    When you have lost as much money as many of us have in relying on the fatuous forecasts of Mr. Granville, and when you have suffered the dilution of an incompetent financing after being told there would either be a strategic financing or a repeat financing by prior investors, then I'll be happy to heed your facile observations.

     

    I remain a bull on AXPW and (unfortunately) haven't sold a share of my holdings despite my belief in the ineptitude of Tom Granville's stewardship. I believe the technology is bigger than the limitations of Axion's CEO.

     

    The proposed reverse-split is at least a year late.
    17 May, 09:38 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    "I feel this is precisely what Axion stock has been waiting for. It will likely move up significantly and punish all those 'nattering nabobs of negativism'... "

     

    Could prove a profitable time for traders ... or not.
    17 May, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • tomcat818
    , contributor
    Comments (42) | Send Message
     
    Ran across this dual carbon (from cotton) lithium ion battery while looking at Graphene use in batteries.

     

    "For larger demand industries such as electric vehicles, Power Japan Plus will operate under a licensing business model, providing technology and expertise to existing battery manufacturers to produce the dual carbon battery." What a novel concept considering likewise suggestions for PbC technology.

     

    Could be nothing more than a pipe dream but interesting none the less.

     

    http://bit.ly/1gBeUsf
    17 May, 02:27 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    It's fascinating, but the materials on their website look more like a capacitor than a battery and I can't begin to imagine where the claimed energy density will come from. For now the Ryden dual carbon battery occupies a place of honor on my mental "potential holy grail" shelf. We should know whether it's a player or wannabe in a decade or so.
    17 May, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (501) | Send Message
     
    At this point I don't have that much to add to what has already been reported.

     

    I was pleased that the 4 additional cube modules were all going to the same entity (that it is a commercial real estate business was also good news) with sufficiently solid delivery dates. It would seem that the client is trying to get the additional installations operation as quickly as they can without overtaxing the contractors involved.

     

    I was also interested that Axion is talking with financial institutions that are interested in establishing partnerships or REITS to provide stable, high-return investment opportunities for their clients. Note: From recent research I've been doing, Axion's "model" would seem to offer more than sufficient returns to make this endeavor attractive. That is, a high teens return is considered a very good number. Lever it up with cheap debt as a Goldman or other leading institution can easily do and you can see how much profit potential must exist.

     

    Also, reading between the lines, I could see a link between the institutions wanting to create these financial instruments and the higher class of institutional investors TG mentioned who may be willing to provide equity financing at a relatively low discount to market. Combine that with the professed motivation behind the reverse split and I could picture the following scenario.

     

    A "quality" Wall Street I-bank like Goldman wants to create investment funds for its clients taking advantage of the big trend in energy. A, or perhaps THE key aspect to such a program is that the perceived risk has to be extremely low. Therefore, for such a program to work, Axion's financial risk has to be eliminated. Goldman (or someone like them) can fix this by investing themselves in Axion. First, the name itself will go a long way towards building confidence. Second, providing a substantial amount of money would help a lot (I'm thinking $20m+ for a 40% stake). Third doing so at a very limited discount to the stock price would also be a confidence building move. Last, but not least getting Axion onto a reputable exchange would be critical.

     

    The bank would then make money in two ways. First, it would have access to (and possibly block competitors access to) the best batteries for frequency regulation which would enable it to build its own (or acting as GP utilizing Limited Partners [ie client] money) solar/storage facilities that would be superior in cost/functionality to that of competitors. Second, it could make money from its 40% or thereabouts stake in Axion itself.

     

    In summary, I suspect their two sets of discussions with financial institutions are more likely two sides of the same coin.
    17 May, 05:01 PM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    The viability of Axion isn't that much of a risk factor for the investors. The only reason they would care is because of warranty. But if the systems have significant warranty issues due to the batteries, the whole system becomes cost ineffective anyway.

     

    I guess Axion would have a throat to choke to backstop the latent risk in the batteries. But if that throat were ever choked, Goldman would lose its entire investment, which means Goldman is effectively backstopping the system do to battery warranty - but with a potential upside I guess.
    17 May, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    I understand the appeal of the "big money" banks, but knowing how Goldman usually plays, "Heads, I win; Tails, you pay double", I feel like a baby sheep in the wolves' den. If we were as big as a grizzly bear, we could play with the wolves, but "baaaaah," isn't very scary.

     

    "Oops, I swallowed the company."
    17 May, 05:29 PM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (501) | Send Message
     
    JamesB: In doing my research I had a discussion, while not about battery storage was generally in this same space and the person very strongly emphasized how conservative the investors are and how concerned they are about risk factors. A key supplier with months of survival capital would pretty much preclude this kind of deal happening. As it is, the relatively unproven PbC battery, regardless of Axion's financial viability, will in any case represent a big hurdle. Remember, these type of projects depend on solid cash flows a decade or more out.

     

    Rick: I'm not a fan of Goldman Sachs and I do agree that they aren't really any better than the sharks Axion has been dealing with. However, I do think the scenario I described does align interests more between Axion and the financier than deals of lesser scope which we've seen in the past.
    17 May, 10:31 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Al, I think there is a difference. "The sharks" only wanted the company to survive as long as it took to eat the meat, and then don't care. One meal and they are done.

     

    I think Goldman has more vision, and would more likely swallow the company for ongoing financial instruments, toxic or otherwise. Pesky Axionistas just get swatted away, pennies on the dollar.

     

    They may see the value of the technology, but not of the legacy shareholders.
    17 May, 10:41 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    "I do think the scenario I described does align interests more between Axion and the financier than deals of lesser scope which we've seen in the past. "

     

    I agree Al and hopefully TG is working along the lines you laid out but with financial groups other than the likes of Goldman Sachs. A Goldman Sachs is not needed to organize a new REIT focusing solely on grid stability properties. The new Board member, David DiGiacinto, likely has the contacts to identify more than one group interested in organizing profitable new REITS dedicated to energy management properties capable of ?X 1.25MW FR service.

     

    I have the impression that the buyer of 'PowerCubes' sold to date is an industrial or commercial property REIT. There is more than one such company and a multitude of large chains that could be interested in acquiring FR and power demand management assets.
    17 May, 11:30 PM Reply Like
  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (335) | Send Message
     
    Not sure if this has been posted - but this sent to me by cousin Tim in Santa Cruz

     

    http://bit.ly/1lNJ0HK

     

    Nice tie in to stotage and AXPW cube developments

     

    Pretty clear we have a winner here

     

    Hoping to find time in next week to do an in depth on CC

     

    Big message for me (whether driven by desire for support for the reverse split or not) - I felt TG was more connected and open and appreciative of us and the unique strength of we Axionistas
    17 May, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (835) | Send Message
     
    The quotes below are from the interview with CEO Tom Werner of SunPower, from the article linked above by dlmca:

     

    "I didn't expect to be here for 11 years and counting, but it's been a hell of a ride. In six years we went from roughly $5 million in revenue to over $2 billion. ...... Storage is like where solar was 10 years ago."
    17 May, 10:58 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    Excellent quote Wayne. It's certainly amazing how a business can scale faster than any investment professional can do.
    17 May, 11:10 PM Reply Like
  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (335) | Send Message
     
    Al M

     

    Like how you are thinking

     

    Hope others in the inner circle have minds open to all possibilities

     

    Believe limited and inexperienced minds were why we were picked clean in the last year
    17 May, 06:12 PM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    John:: If you plan on being the one who dies with the most toys, then this should probably be in your stable:

     

    http://wrd.cm/RLmFjq

     

    As they say - its somehow almost practical.
    17 May, 09:21 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Every man deserves at least one dream car, but most outgrow that stage once they get the dream and find that having isn't as much fun as wanting. I've had a couple dream cars including a 92 NSX and an 02 Porsche Carrera ragtop. Now my idea of ideal is closer to an Audi A6.
    17 May, 09:28 PM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    As a 23 year old who will soon be in the market for a new car, a diesel A4 would be fine by me. Nothing against the A6, of course.
    17 May, 09:32 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29519) | Send Message
     
    Free advice from one who ignored the obvious far too many times. Buy a late model used A4 diesel and let the first purchaser pay for the pleasure of driving it off the showroom floor.
    17 May, 09:51 PM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    JP, thank you. That was part of the plan but now it's an absolute.
    17 May, 10:58 PM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    One thing to note about the i8 that I thought might be relevant.

     

    It looks like they chose a lithium ion battery pack that is just big enough to call it a Plug In Hybrid - but not so big to give it much range (it will go 22 miles on a charge).

     

    Depending on the driving cycle, its just over-or-under the magic 100mpg number. The rest of car's efficiency is driven by low weight from a carbon fiber and aluminum body, plus a 3 cylinder direct injection engine.

     

    Its sort of validation from BMW of John's argument that the sweet spot for lithium ion is right around hybrid functionality. Muskateers take note!
    18 May, 04:08 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Meade
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    JP, my mid life car was the Saturn Sports Coupe. I got the four one delivered to the state of Washington.

     

    It had a 4 cylinder 16 valve engine with enough torque to start in second gear. It was manual with a five speed transmission. The speedometer went to 110 mph, but using the tachometer, the top speed was closer to 140+ mph. Going into curve on a mountain road I would be doing 60mph and come out at 75mph with the car hugging the line.

     

    Heading for the west side of the state on early Sunday morning when the state petrol was home in bed. I would have German and Japanese sports cars pass going 85 mph on the straights. Sometimes when a group would go by, it was obvious they where racing.
    I would say what the hell and put the metal to the petal and laugh when after 5 miles they long behind me in my 15k dollar sports car.
    20 May, 09:01 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3322) | Send Message
     
    Oh, the advice I wish I could have given a 23 y/o me!

     

    (or 43 y/o me for that matter... ;)
    17 May, 11:01 PM Reply Like
  • isthisonebetter
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    48, I'm all ears.
    17 May, 11:06 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3322) | Send Message
     
    Delay gratification. Believe in tomorrow. It will be sweeter for the wait.

     

    Manana is a trap. Make tomorrow better *today*.

     

    Banish all debt.

     

    Be patient and operate from strength. Do things to build your strength.

     

    Far more than power, it is weakness that truly corrupts.

     

    When you see your chance take it. They rarely come around again.

     

    Listen to your spidey sense. Avoid doing big stupid things. Little ones though, rock on, but try to learn from the mistakes.

     

    I read, and heard, and received a lot of good advice when I was younger. I was too smart for it all though. ;)

     

    I'm sure others here have many more gems of their own to pass on. And of certainly greater value.
    17 May, 11:52 PM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (649) | Send Message
     
    The greatest learning advice for the young.

     

    " I was so much older then
    I'm younger than that now".

     

    Compliments of the greatest poet of the 20th century, Bob Dylan.

     

    Oh yeah. My dream car? The one I got. A Toyota Tundra with the small V-8 and the towing package. XM radio is a plus if you travel frequently. Best travel vehicle of my life with lots of room, tows tractors to the shop and remote properties, tows a water trailer, carries all the rocks, timbers, etc. to the dump I have on this property, and never goes to the shop.
    18 May, 12:06 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    48: " I was too smart for it all though"

     

    It's amazing how much my father learned from the time I was 18 until I was 25 or so. :-))

     

    >ISTB: "48, I'm all ears".

     

    Grow your hair longer and no one will notice! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • kevin lemm
    , contributor
    Comments (89) | Send Message
     
    As my grandpa used to say " we grow to soon old, and to late schmart" no I didn't miss-spell it, that's how you say it.
    18 May, 12:18 AM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (835) | Send Message
     
    Anybody else believe Friday’s cc has likely given the pps a pretty solid floor for the time being? ISTM the primary drags on the pps and market cap for the past 2-3 years have been lack of sales, lack of good news, and less than desirable (toxic) financings. I thought a pretty darn credible roadmap was laid out on how these drags will likely start to be alleviated in the coming weeks and months.

     

    I’ve long thought that Axion’s Mkt Cap would be at least $100M if not for these drags. So I have to believe that if potential investors watching Axion start to believe in this roadmap, then we’ll start heading toward that $100 Mkt Cap. Which would of course lead to over a 100% increase in share price from its current level. BTW, there were over 22K clicks on Axion’s Q1 transcript. — http://bit.ly/1qMoGM8

     

    In response to the poll about whether it would be trucks, trains or PC developments that will be first to lead to a doubling of the pps, I would say none of the above. I think instead the pps will double as a culmination of events start to occur and more and more investors begin to believe in the entirety of the roadmap. Regarding the RS and uplisting to the NASDAQ: If they happen, I’m of the opinion that they will turn out to be very good moves.

     

    So at this time, I feel a pretty solid floor is set, and the pps will either trade sideways or go up in the next few weeks/months. I would be awfully surprised if the NS rollout doesn’t take us to at least .20. And I expect a few surprises along the way that will help boost confidence. And if we can get any kind of momentum going, it could likely feed on itself. The higher the pps goes, the less the fear becomes about this fall’s capital raise. And let's not forget the PIPRs are gone!
    18 May, 03:33 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3322) | Send Message
     
    "there were over 22K clicks on Axion’s Q1 transcript."

     

    Wayne, I think if one looks more closely, it appears that the 22K clicks is for *all* the various transcripts that they post...
    18 May, 04:13 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    I think NSC has just as much probability to get us to .40-.50 if we get the same buying surge we got from Kia. But for that, we finally need them to make an announcement about their future electric plans.

     

    All it takes is one major fund to buy in to send us there. Wanna bet that whichever fund doesn't get the finance deal will buy in on the open market to steal the show before the winner gets his shares? Push up the minimum discount to market!
    18 May, 04:18 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    The troll lwinkle is posting FUD on the transcript comments. That is not good for new eyes to Axion.
    18 May, 04:30 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    WiO: I liked the CC. I didn't like the fact that *again* things beyond TG's control (weather and inspectors) delayed the first Bysolar installation.

     

    I'm figuring the P.O.'s won't be "executed" until the results of that first one are available for sufficient time to have confidence that the next four will do about as well.

     

    That leads me to wonder about construction schedules and seasonality of them in the NY/NYC areas.

     

    That leads me to wonder if those batteries will deliver *this* year.

     

    That leads me to wonder of any support of further PC sales, or even optimism about near-term stock price, can be expected from that quarter.

     

    All *that* leads me to wonder just how much sideways, and *not* down, can be expected as we enter the vacation season and the market tends to be less robust until ... September or so?

     

    That leaves ePower PR of various types - not all *that* near-term for *substantive* impact - and (NSC) as catalysts.

     

    As to PIPErs being gone, John hasn't yet confirmed, AFAIR, from either short percentages or the two expected filings.

     

    As I mentioned in my blog a few days back, our assessment that ARCA wasn't a factor anymore appears to have been premature.

     

    In ignorance, but that's never deterred me,
    HardToLove
    18 May, 01:31 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4428) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... The best the stock can hope for is a publicly visible "Proof of Concept". Something the PowerCubes can't & won't do this year and may not ... ever.
    18 May, 02:19 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    "The best the stock can hope for is a publicly visible 'Proof of Concept'."

     

    Two potential candidates come to mind - announcements of large sales to NEW customers (PRs publicly visible) and announcement (with video) of the NS999 pushing (pulling) a lot of weight around without problems.
    18 May, 04:32 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    1350 people get email updates from SA about AXPW, but only 370 followers to the APC...
    18 May, 05:05 AM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (282) | Send Message
     
    Ranma,

     

    I still like the fact that the "followers" have grown to 370. It's another milestone that I watch. I think it was around last Nov. that the number passed 300! That is a pretty good growth rate. I'll bet that the number receiving e-mail notification has grown at the same or greater rate than the followers! I think you are right (if I'm interpreting what you're saying correctly) in that all of these eyes give us an insight into how many people are watching AXPW. Someday soon, that will result in some (or many) of these people buying shares , and that will result in a supply/demand imbalance! Good for us!!
    18 May, 10:48 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    I suspect some/many of 1350 are simply site scrubbers that simply republish and try to get some ad revenue. They subscribe to everything that could be republishable without any value add.

     

    Note: "Republishable" in an technical sense, not a legal or ethical sense
    18 May, 10:52 AM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (781) | Send Message
     
    I do know that I have introduced many to the Axion story and stock that have never looked at SA or even know what it is! They do not follow the day to day events of Axion and have no desire to do so but they do own the stock and many of them will probably buy more once the stock starts to behave normally and move northward a bit!

     

    How many of these types are out there associated with this story?

     

    I am still of the opinion that TG still owes us some more data regarding his significant orders which he stated means a series of million dollar orders.

     

    I am definitely believing that the story is ripening, we should have most of the current negative info behind us now and TG put forth some info to make us feel better regarding the RS and authorized shares along with a possible favorable funding. As mentioned by most, ePower and NS will have a good impact on laying out a future path but I believe that the most important near term issue is the BySolar initiative and the other TG rumored PowerCube sales.

     

    TG has not delivered on what he stated he believes significant orders really are (series of million dollar orders) to date. He also stated that potential customers are waiting to see the first BySolar project in action prior to moving forward. I am hopeful that once the first BySolar project is commissioned "early next month" this will clear the log jam and give TG the ability to finally start announcing those significant orders. For me, if TG is able to announce a multi megawatt PowerCube sale with the investor group or maybe two or three PowerCube deals in the next month or two would be HUGE! This would provide the near term path to revenues that TG hinted to. This would finally give him some credibility!

     

    I don't know what TG did to the Universal Powers but talk about some unfortunate "luck"! A tremendously hard winter causing delays along with now a NJ Building Inspector causing more delays! At some point the Universe has to think TG has suffered enough and will cut him a little break! ;-))

     

    I am just sitting here in the sun on a beautiful 80 degree Sunday morning having coffee. This is my church! Now it is time to fire up the Harley!

     

    I can't wait for this coming week, will this be the week that Axion stock finally turns the page and starts the next chapter? It sure is feeling like that to me!

     

    RBrun357
    18 May, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • growsmart
    , contributor
    Comments (158) | Send Message
     
    I used to follow the APC. The mean, ill-informed and slanderous comments turned me off completely. I track John's comments and link to interesting stuff on the APC from there.
    Courtesy and civility go a long way to attracting people to this story and the other stuff scares them off.
    18 May, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (835) | Send Message
     
    RBrun: "I can't wait for this coming week, will this be the week that Axion stock finally turns the page and starts the next chapter? It sure is feeling like that to me!"

     

    Ditto on that one. --- I'm anticipating that as the totality of the cc starts to sink in, many will decide the risk/reward ratio is heavily tilted toward the reward side at this time.

     

    The cc shifted my thinking in a major way, and now view the odds of the pps going down more than a penny or two in the near-term to be remote, and quite insignificant compared to the upside potential.
    18 May, 12:37 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    "site scrubbers"

     

    Maybe, but I think those guys would simply scrape the entire site like a web crawler rather than subscribe for email alerts for each individual stock.

     

    We could also test this theory by finding a stock with few followers. That would give a floor on the number of automated followers.
    18 May, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • GambleAholic
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    growsmart, so very true.

     

    I brought up the idea recently that perhaps we should start another blog string somewhere else. APH does a great job deleting the worst unjustified attacks on other posters, but the barrage of other bad posts by a small minority of guys here has been left to the rest of us to police. But with many of the thoughtful posters being understandably fatigued by the onslaught, that policing hasn't worked very well. I've tried, and the conference call that addressed some of the concerns helped, too, but we've seen some of the same ill-informed and slanderous and ax-grinding posts resurface.

     

    Unfortunately, we've seen from the yahoo blog what a few bad actors can do to a blog, and that they often don't go away on their own.

     

    A balanced, thoughtful blog is a helpful blog. Here's to hoping.
    18 May, 01:06 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1476) | Send Message
     
    "Mean, ill informed and slanderous comments" ???

     

    Compared to rest of the blogosphere and heck much of the media for that matter APC is extremely civil and the posters quite fair.
    18 May, 01:54 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    Ranma, let me know what you find out about "scrubbers".
    18 May, 02:07 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1476) | Send Message
     
    Dunno Wayne. I'd say memories are very short. Just 2 months ago we had a huge pps and volume spike that doubled the stock in under a week. Some said it was simply the unleashing of the spring that was compressed due to months of PIPEr selling. Remember how the effects of PIPEnd dominated APC discussion for a good month? Forgotten now.

     

    But that price spike (doubling) in fact reversed almost completely and the price returned to whence it had come. At $.20 virtually nobody thought $.13 possible, yet in short order ...

     

    Just a couple months earlier the price had tremendous difficulty getting up over $.10xx it seemed. Back then a lot of conjecture seemed to be whether the bottom was going to be $.07 or more like $.05.

     

    I guess my point is that when it's down people think it's headed lower. When it's up people think it's headed higher. One day they'll be right on that but often when people have the strongest instincts on price moves is when they are actually proven wrong.

     

    I have no idea the direction of the next move. I only trimmed recently because the market cap was at the high end of its range for well over a year and I see more share printing coming in a few months. Whether good news overpowers that in time to get a favorable financing at higher market cap is unpredictable IMO.
    18 May, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17309) | Send Message
     
    GambleAholic: I encourage you to follow up on starting a separate blog where tighter moderation by you can be done.

     

    I will *not* participate there but others of like mind should make it successful for your purposes.

     

    HardToLove
    18 May, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2096) | Send Message
     
    Hi GA,
    APH does a great job. just referencing the brand x board proves it. I agree that this board needs to be balanced, but the negatives prove this isn't a pump and dump scheme. It also shows that there is risk in investing that requires risk/reward weighing by each investor. A reading of the prior APCs shows the psychological strain that has developed over time for the investors here and this would carry over to any other board. Watching paint dry with no news has left TG and the BOD as easy targets for frustration. I personally think they are doing a fine job of keeping the company alive (the pipe sucked, nuf said) until sales kick in, but it has taken waaaaaay longer than I ever thought it would and that is on me. I didn't take into account that a disruptive tech would require a ground up engineering process to make our batteries usable for commercial and retail sales to develop since they aren't drop in replacements for any other battery tech.

     

    The so called "bad actors" are investors or former (maybe later investors again), that are frustrated people that we have come to know, as people (warts and all), on this board. I'll be the first to tell you (if I can beat Mama to it) that I'm not perfect and have been known to vent my frustrations at times.

     

    I don't see this board as a rainbow and lollypop PR center, but as a questioning and growing, continual Due Diligence center. With some social aspects along the way.
    18 May, 02:18 PM Reply Like
  • growsmart
    , contributor
    Comments (158) | Send Message
     
    Comparing the smell of the unpleasant comments on the APC to the open sewer that is the rest of the blogosphere doesn't make unpleasant comments civil or acceptable. I have found a way to benefit from the APC without having to see most of this stuff.
    I'm older going on elderly and I grew up in a different world and the US was a different country then. I suspect that the anonymity of these blogs brings out the worst in some people.
    It is not necessary to be unkind and it is still true that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.
    18 May, 02:50 PM Reply Like
  • GambleAholic
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    stilldazed, i am always a strong advocate of balance. either extreme is detrimental to thoughtful discussion, analysis and decision making. pumping is bad. bashing is bad. balance is good. it is all a matter of degree.

     

    don't need it to be even close to perfect, and it is unrealistic to assume it ever will be, but when several people are thoughtfully saying things have gone too far the bad way, i think it is fair to say we probably have a problem.

     

    the recent pc sales announcement, the quarterly press release, and the conference call have all given us some new stuff to comment on, which is wonderful. i look forward to THOSE posts. those are helpful. the endless rehashing of the bad stuff everyone already knows is such a healthy community killer!
    18 May, 02:56 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1476) | Send Message
     
    growsmart> Securities markets have never been the most civil places; think the pushing, shoving and yelling of the open pit exchanges. We stock talkers are an extension of that world yet far more civil.

     

    Times have changed I agree re: civility in general and that bothers me as much as you. But APC strikes me as a highly civil, respectful place of argumentation and a benefit to us all. Perhaps I think it's more civil than you because I developed a thick skin when I wrote against the "End the Fed" crowd who think that big government and money printing are sins to trump all other sins. My critics have been, let's just say, grossly unfair in distorting what I say and sometimes nasty. (See the Amazon reviews of my book) Here's the entirety of a recent email I got from a fellow who found my website:

     

    "I wish your poisonous no brain article did not poison my google page. Your staff either works for the fed or us government or your a true retard publication. Prices are already runaway. You must not live in the real world. Stop writing your garbage and spewing it into the public."

     

    Needless to say his ideas are truly helpful.

     

    I'd honestly like to see an APC post you feel is mean spirited if you would use the 'link to comment' function and post the link.
    18 May, 04:14 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (835) | Send Message
     
    RA: --- (from APC 333) "Anybody else have thoughts about the odds? I either have to lick my wounds now and reboard the train at a higher fare than I scalped my ticket for or wait for hopefully a cheaper ticket later in light of the 'ticket printing' to come. Tough decision. I hate buying higher than I sold!"
    --
    Hey RA, your above words got me to thinking about odds, and were part of what prompted my earlier lengthy post. Like yourself, I "dunno" either, and can only guess. It just "feels" to me that the NS rollout could be a real game-changer, plus there's the potential for other incremental news to bolster confidence. OTOH, we could go into another sales and news drought. But IMO, the odds favor the former, which is why I added this past week.
    18 May, 04:41 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    <<<I used to follow the APC. The mean, ill-informed and slanderous comments turned me off completely. I track John's comments and link to interesting stuff on the APC from there.>>>>...

     

    @growsmart: I like your technique, but I've found that "playing ostrich" doesn't always work out so well when real money is involved.
    18 May, 05:23 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1476) | Send Message
     
    Wayne> I agree the NS 999 rollout could garner significant press. If they make statements to the effect that it would be impossible without PbC batteries or other strong words of testimonial for Axion I agree it could pop the stock considerably.

     

    I have to stick to my knitting though which is gauging risk/reward based on financial metrics and qualitative product assessments. Market cap, cash burn, revenues, likelihood of financing on decent terms. Handicapping the odds of news and how favorable is not my forte. If we get a big pop on 999 I may trim a bit more in hopes of buying back lower.
    18 May, 08:36 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2180) | Send Message
     
    I look forward to re-investing in Axion when there is a new CEO, if possible.

     

    Like HTL, I doubt I would participate on your carefully manicured future blog. I am sure that is a great relief to you. :)
    18 May, 10:43 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (869) | Send Message
     
    Maybe they could call the new blog Axion Pumper Host. No negative views allowed.
    19 May, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3905) | Send Message
     
    "growsmart> ....

     

    I'd honestly like to see an APC post you feel is mean spirited if you would use the 'link to comment' function and post the link. "

     

    Can't "like" more than once so decided to reinforce with repetition.
    19 May, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (781) | Send Message