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  • micmac1
    , contributor
    Comments (58) | Send Message
     
    First at last :-)
    22 Jun, 08:08 AM Reply Like
  • maplecorner
    , contributor
    Comments (25) | Send Message
     
    Last right now.
    22 Jun, 08:15 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Maple, Fret not.
    22 Jun, 08:43 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    Is this the week news breaks? Beginning of June becomes the last week of June and the stock price ticks down as tension builds.
    22 Jun, 08:46 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    When a stated date or milepost is missed, it is incumbent upon the BOD to issue new guidance. How can they say something, not do anything, then not say anything? I am not happy about the "first week of June" NS-BS. Not happy at all.
    22 Jun, 10:53 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Forward looking-statements are made as of a particular date and companies have no legal or moral duty to update them for subsequent events. That's the reason every set of forward-looking statements incorporates the risk factors included in a company's most recent SEC filings.

     

    While the securities laws do require companies to update certain types of forward-looking statements for major reversals of fortune that are material events in their own right, NOBODY updates forward-looking statements for something as trivial as date slippage in somebody else's schedule.
    22 Jun, 11:06 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I thought you were not happy about the CFO timing.

     

    Target missed on NS 999? Clearly NSC has not set a priority of importance, has poor program management in this case, has had numerous unexpected engineering challenges or "some of the above". Makes Axion look worse because they can't hit a date to save themselves and are darn near totally incompetent when it comes to communicating to their stake holders.

     

    BTW, Thanks for sharing your points concerning your read on the PbC and Uber battery research. Nice to have some meat mixed in with the standard "Where's Waldo" Axion deliverables. Great tech. carried forth by TG doing the Gerald Ford two step.

     

    http://bit.ly/1p6dols
    22 Jun, 11:06 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    John, IMO, they most certainly have a moral duty. They merely have the legal right to ignore it.
    22 Jun, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (723) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I was absolutely convinced NS was going to buy batteries in the Q4 of last year. Clearly my read of progress was lost in the ozone. I have inadvertently learned that the battery racks themselves were designed, a prototype installed and subsequently modified, etc. before what we see now. To me that is very good news.

     

    In fact, the delays that to us seem endless and without direction are good news to my ears. Clearly NS is being very deliberate about this project and that means they are very serious. NS has no interest whatsoever in what we think about their progress and are working in backup systems mode. When one considers the millions being invested in 999, it is only logical that NS will take steps on what they would consider very secure footing.

     

    When 999 finally rolls, it will be tested (to fit my theory) for six months before NS takes the next step. That next step might be to make one additional yard unit, an OTR unit, and a slave. From where I sit, that suggests additional purchases of 3,000 batteries next year, if all testing this year goes well. And if everything works out in testing during 2015, I would expect hefty orders for 2016. This implies that all systems work as expected, not just the PbC.

     

    Whatever the case, I still anticipate NS to not move the needle much for the next 18 months. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. 'less'n I change my mind later. :>)

     

    I continue to anticipate and am anxious for healthy top line growth in cubes. Evidence I see reinforces my standing theory of cubes, ePower, and NS in that order. Of course I am guilty of frequently seeing evidence that fits my current thinking on any topic.

     

    Meanwhile, the USA plays Portugal tonight. That will provide me a few hours of diversion.

     

    And, as a co-ink-uh-dink, today marks the beginning of the days becoming shorter. That's good. Shorter days means I won't have to wait as long for good PbC news, yes? Days rolling by faster. Perfect !
    22 Jun, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (723) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, just out of idle curiosity, what would you have the BOD say? The board has has no influence whatsoever at NSC.

     

    Seems to me Axion is in a Catch 22. If they (in the person of TG) make no predictions regarding 999 they are vulnerable to attack for not communicating. If they make predictions on behalf on NSC that subsequently miss they look silly.

     

    My guess is that you know almost as much about 999 progress as TG. You certainly know as much as is public information. The only folks who truly know anything about 999 are in Norfolk and Roanoke. They're not talking.
    22 Jun, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Then perhaps TG would do well not to say anything?

     

    I would merely have them say something similar to what you just did. Frank and open communications.
    22 Jun, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Edmund: but the couple of times TG tried "frank", he ended up looking like a "weenie".

     

    N.B. I assume "frank" means passing on what he truly believes to be the truth, e.g. dates, certain activities, ...

     

    :-))

     

    Seriously though, that sort of communication is always desirable and the real modification needed is a less-cloudy crystal ball I think.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    22 Jun, 12:25 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Valleywood,
    re': "In fact, the delays that to us seem endless and without direction are good news to my ears."

     

    I totally agree and posted almost the exact same sentiment in APC 340 June 6:

     

    "The "delays", IMO, are a direct result of successful testing in Roanoke. The PbC supercabattery must have delivered. They knew what killed the goat, they knew what cooked the weenie, so they knew what the PbC had to do and it did everything they wanted. IMO, that meant they were free to dream big and move ahead methodically."

     

    That comment was well-received, not to mention quite a bit longer :)
    22 Jun, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    htl - you crack'n me up
    22 Jun, 12:30 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Ed, I don't think they necessarily have a moral duty to update of their own accord, and they definitely don't have a legal duty b/c of the safe harbor. Although, their failure to update, I think is part of the reason that Axion is in the dumps.

     

    However, tap dancing and refusing to update in the face of direct questions to prior "initiatives" is a major cause for concern in my opinion. And we have a real Bill Bojangles on our hands.

     

    http://bit.ly/1prHJqp
    22 Jun, 12:38 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Maybe I don't understand the concept of moral duty as it is used by a lawyer. I'm thinking more along the lines of "the man gave his word".
    22 Jun, 12:49 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Vw, maybe something short and to the point. Like, "Norfolk Southern has informed us that certain issues not pertaining to Axion's PbC battery have pushed back the rolling out of the highly anticipated NS999. We understand the great excitement and great promise this project holds for the future not only for our company but for the environment. You patience and support is greatly appreciated." Further updates will be posted.

     

    Thank You
    TG or.........

     

    Most of here on this site pretty much know what's going on and don't need our hand held. But others who just check the stock price and only check for news because of time constraints or any other number of reasons, might need some assurance.
    22 Jun, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    VW, If I was TG I would handle the NSC public disclosure, as it relates to Axions interests, in the following manner. First I would ask NSC what I could share relative to detail and timing along with what they already disclose in public. Then I would relay to the parties interested in Axion's progress what they have disclosed in public along with the comments NSC indicated I could share. So in effect, "Here is what NSC has shared in their releases and here is what we are allowed to share with you concerning our program(s)."

     

    In fact I view this as the professional way to share, no the only way to share information in an NDA restricted program. Anything else could upset your customer or make you look like you are leading people on.
    22 Jun, 01:03 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Ed, so am I ... that's why I get so pissed. To be quite frank, I put more faith than I should have in TG b/c of my personal friendship with JP and his assessment of him.
    22 Jun, 10:53 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    "or make you look like you are leading people on."

     

    ii, f that hasn't been happening, then what has?
    22 Jun, 10:57 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I believe this is primarily a symptom called the Peter Principle.

     

    "The Peter Principle is a concept in management theory in which the selection of a candidate for a position is based on their performance in their current role rather than on their abilities relevant to the intended role. It is named after Laurence J. Peter who co-authored the humorous 1969 book The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong with Raymond Hull. The authors suggest that people will tend to be promoted until they reach their "position of incompetence"." -Wikipedia

     

    TG may have been an excellent guide to take a company from the lab to the marketplace, but now that we're negotiating 5 year big-league contracts with the media watching for the "next big thing", he simply doesn't have "the right stuff". We need someone who is a lot sexier, in body and voice. And this is not some minor detail. No president ever won the highest office in the age of television without good looks and carisma.
    23 Jun, 12:34 AM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2804) | Send Message
     
    MASI - John Peterson has 54,000 followers on SA. Tesla folks certainly get a share. The majority by a long shot more than likely follow Axion (and batteries or battery applications) - Axion folks herein are more than likely to be those checking Axion's price. So, more than likely high 90%'s of Axion investors know what is going on; have the best available information possible, etc., etc.

     

    That's very possibly the extent of any assurance possible. Beyond that, it's all guesses according to plan; place your bets; and fret before you do that. After placing your bet, rest in confidence; or don't place your bet.

     

    Make that MASI, et al.
    23 Jun, 11:03 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    The 54,000 follower number is the result of a failed SA experiment in early 2010 to suggest that new users follow some of the more popular contributors. During the course of that experiment, my follower count rocketed from 5,000 to 50,000 in 9 months. I'd be willing to bet that most of the 54,000 are not regular readers.

     

    On a year to date basis, I've averaged a little over 10,000 page views per article, which seems like a more reliable indicator of my true following.
    23 Jun, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • Sohkubo
    , contributor
    Comments (98) | Send Message
     
    nakedjaybird - while I have no opinion on the % of investors who closely follow JP or the concentrators, JP has explained in the past that that majority of his followers were from a time when SA was automatically adding new members to prolific/higher profile authors. IMO no judgments can therefore be made on the basis of the 54,000 followers as most of those probably do not actually watch JP.
    23 Jun, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • Sohkubo
    , contributor
    Comments (98) | Send Message
     
    Ha ha, sorry JP, you beat me to it. In the daunting face of chemists, lawyers, engineers, professional investors and retired aviators, my only minor talent in this forum - Correcting Others on Minor Quibbles... foiled again! :P
    23 Jun, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'm always quick to correct misunderstandings about what my follower count means because the raw number makes me look far more important and powerful than I am.
    23 Jun, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    I wish the number really was 54,000 ...
    23 Jun, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2804) | Send Message
     
    John et al, - being aware of earlier guestimates of AXPW stockholders somewhere in the 5000 category, I had no fear of guessing some 90% of AXPW interested folk are within the body of some 50,000 followers of JP; if the real numbers are 5000 out of 10,000 per page review, over a years time, I still think high 90%'s are informed.
    23 Jun, 01:11 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Did NS say something or not to TG about "the first week in June"? Wasn't that the impression he leaves by saying anything? He could be doing us a disservice or he could be considered to have done NS a disservice by damaging their reputation. Or the NS999 program. Just consider the comments here about NS in light of them "missing their target." Or was it their target? I just think if you are going to put a date out there and the date goes by, you have some explaining to do. If I tell you I'm going to do this or that today and it isn't done, I feel compelled to explain why. Seems that simple. No legal duty. No demand necessary. I am not "demanding" anything here of TG, I'm just saying I expect something other and perhaps something better than what we've got here. Which is a failure to communicate.
    22 Jun, 12:37 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Most people find investing in individual stocks daunting or down right scary. They know they have to grow their retirement nest egg but don't have the time to do the research or due diligence or feel they don't have the expertise. Axion Power is a publicly traded company. Maybe just some courtesy (not trying to sound mammy-pamby) would go a long way. It may have curtailed some selling or might have even encouraged some buying of the stock.

     

    I strongly feel the the same as Edmund in his statement " I just think if you are going to put a date out there and the date goes by, you have some explaining to do. If I tell you I'm going to do this or that today and it isn't done, I feel compelled to explain why. Seems that simple. No legal duty."

     

    There is a question I have to ask though. What is the $ cost of putting out a press release? From what I understand, it can be quite expensive.
    22 Jun, 02:42 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    A press release cost can go from ridiculously expensive to essentially free. Depends on who you are trying to communicate to. For a company as small as Axion, a press release can have minimal cost. Email to a few dozen online bloggers and journalists, to everybody on the shareholder mailing list, and anybody else who may be interested. This is free. I also released many via low cost publicists, that typically have a few hundred to a few thousand media contacts. The cost was a few hundred dollars, IIRC.

     

    If the amount of information released is sufficiently substantial that it needs to be registered with the SEC, the cost is higher. Note that a large company may release thousands of press releases per year, but only a few dozen require formal SEC documentation.
    22 Jun, 09:10 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    Rick Krementz> +++ Brownie points.
    23 Jun, 12:39 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Thanx Rick, it was most likely the ones pertaining to the SEC that I was remembering, and that was from years ago. I can't even remember the company but it was on a CC and the CFO mentioned that some press releases cost several thousand dollars. That always stuck with me.
    23 Jun, 01:08 AM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2804) | Send Message
     
    Rick - yes, many ways to feed, skin or kill a cat.

     

    One of the best (effective) press releases is the one where there is really something to write about because of a significant event or happening, sometimes even a thundering announcement. They usually occur when possible, or justified.
    23 Jun, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    Masi - Yep, sure can spend money if you want. I worked with one organization that spent > $10,000 per press release, launched in ritzy NYC digs, champagne, models, black-tie, live music, show and tell, yada-yada. Sorta fun, not very effective - it was more about a corrupt/ incompetent BoD wanting to have a high-status party celebrating how wonderful and enlightened they-themselves were. Made we want to puke.

     

    Well, at least that kind of press release party is not something we have to worry about with Axion's current management.
    23 Jun, 04:24 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    A plain vanilla national release through Business Wire costs between $600 and $1,000 depending on word count. Anything less is generally considered inappropriate for a public company, but then again so is issuing a press release if you don't have something material to disclose to the market. Newsie little stockholder updates are fine for private companies like ePower, but they give rise to a world of thorny regulatory issues for public companies.
    23 Jun, 05:10 PM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (723) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, IIRC, someone in Juanita said that they expected 999 to roll in the first week of June. Try as I might, I can't remember if that came from higher up, or, as is often the case with me, I remember things that never happened. I guess I was comfortable with that date before TG said anything. For sure however I know that Juanita is not the source of accurate information. That will come from Roanoke.

     

    Quite frankly, I wish TG would say WTTE : " NS continues work on the 999 and although we might see progress as glacial, they continue to build moats around their technology, so clearly this is a significant project to them. They are our first significant customer and we are proud of our partnership with them. We wish for them continued success with 999 and stand ready to assist them with whatever they request. Other than that we stand behind our NS partner and hope for speedy progress toward their goals."

     

    I'd leave it right there, and subject myself to criticism for being noncommittal. Under no circumstances would I use the word, "frustrating" in our dealings with them. a'hem. I consider our customers to be the finest citizens on planet Earth and I would accept having asparagus cast in my direction over that unbridled enthusiasm for them.

     

    FWIW, I consider TG to be dreadfully weak in communication with us as shareholders, and pathetic in prognostication. He has been IMO stellar at keeping Axion going in the most difficult of historical economic circumstances.

     

    It is my hope (and prediction, BTW) that when those "significant" cube sales are announced I will have a more kindly attitude toward his communication skills.

     

    Right now I remain stewing in my juices. I predict champagne rounds in two years but will hang waiting four more from last March + - . And when I'm right, I'll inform everything looking even remotely human that I am an investing genius.
    22 Jun, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    "IMO stellar at keeping Axion going in the most difficult of historical economic circumstances."

     

    Love your posts VW, but difficult economic circumstances have been gone for a lil bit
    22 Jun, 11:02 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >Edmund Metcalfe ... I believe I remember correctly that Norfolk said NS999 was an end of June event. That was just for shop work. So ... look for daylight in July/August. Patience. Everything is just depressingly fine.
    22 Jun, 01:20 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I'm thinking TG mixed up Jun and Jul. Seems doable, though his voice suggests to me that he's comfortable during CCs, not nervous or prone to misspeaking.
    Inasmuch as he had just squeaked under the wire to meet his last date commitment and had completely missed two before that, much to the chagrin of many, I felt certain (and assumed) he would not do so so soon again. Made some 'portfolio decisions' and lost some opportunities. That's on me. Give him a total pass? fuhgeddaboutit. Have more patience? Can do.
    22 Jun, 01:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    DRich, "Patience. Everything is just depressingly fine."

     

    Amen. It's a hard thing to have when every short leg of your journey starts costing you half of what you thought you might have in your pocket. IMO, even more painful than having your shares fall by half because if you're sure of your bet you know it's still the same percentage of "company ownership level fiat currency" in your possession.
    22 Jun, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... It's now close to 3 years since I made the determination that Mr. Granville is as much a mushroom as the rest of us. The one caveat is that he lives just slightly better light ... but not by much.
    22 Jun, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    DRich, I can't argue your point. I guess I've come to the same conclusion over a similar time frame but I just can't stand for hanging in the dark and having to eat his BS. I'm just not that kind of mushroom. I guess I expect more, and unclear guidance due to a poor communications skill set REALLY exacerbates the situation for me. In fact it's so maddening I almost wish the PbC tech. wasn't as good as I think it is for certain markets so I could avoid having to keep digging through TG's words for anything. Or IIRC what Rick K. said.
    22 Jun, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... If this up & coming little hat-trick doesn't work out well, then hope the next owner of the device knows what to do with it.
    22 Jun, 02:50 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Agreed. Separate from my own self interest, I'd hate to see certain apps lose this one. It's hard to spend a career targeting waste and want something good not to service the markets it a manner where its function excels.

     

    I'm convinced but not positive that will be the case. Well until a better mouse trap comes along. Or some other outside, not really competitive, solution garners favor due to extenuating circumstances.
    22 Jun, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    "I'm thinking TG mixed up Jun and Jul."

     

    Bahahahaha .. stop it.
    22 Jun, 11:03 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1639) | Send Message
     
    In the meantime, 10 years down the gauntlet and 100 millions of R&D, retail stockholders crushed by the future owner and good'ol Granville walking away with 4-5 million dollars over 10 years. For compensation in a depressingly boring sector, it strikes me that he has a pretty good deal from an up and coming company!

     

    He has the last laugh...
    23 Jun, 05:34 PM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1883) | Send Message
     
    When you put it that way, Amouna, 4 to 5 percent of total monies invested going to the CEO does sound quite expensive. For a star, well maybe, but I'm convinced that TG is no star.

     

    Somebody recently commented that TG needs to be replaced by a CEO that is young and "sexy". Youth and charisma should not be high on the list of qualities for this job as competence ranks far higher. Age perhaps not on the list at all. But the staid manner of TG certainly won't help to close high dollar deals in a cutting edge technology viewed as risky by many potential customers. Buyers assume an older person cannot be at the cutting edge unfortunately.

     

    If there were clearly a star for the CEO position with strong abilities in every area, I would be for replacing TG but with no stronger candidate identified I think he should be CEO for as long as he's willing to work hard at it.
    23 Jun, 08:21 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I'm done "contributing" to the "missed date commitment" issue. But looking into it I now have another question. Here's the relevant part of the transcript:

     

    "In the last few weeks our project engineer for the Norfolk Southern Locomotive project travel to Texas to assist Norfolk Southern and their integrator with the boost charge to our PbC batteries. We shipped the batteries for this project nearly 17 months ago and they have been sitting idle thus the need for charge before they’re shipped in their final container locations to the Norfolk Southern yard, in Juniata.

     

    The “Final” NS-999 components will be assembled later this month, including our batteries. The expectation is at the locomotives will be on the road the first week in June. We’ve scheduled an inspection right in review meeting with Norfolk Southern in mid June. As part of that meeting, we will review the work outlined and discuss next steps for the over the road hybrid unit and feature all electric locomotives. We are optimistic and anxious to see our PbC batteries perform in a real world [ph] [graveyard] environment."

     

    Anyone know what "shipped in their final container locations" means? Is it possible that the racking system has some ability to be pre-racked, like 4 rack-packs or something? Has anyone ever reached out to the Texas company that built the racking system? Maybe someone with a good twang?

     

    Installing 864 batteries (or 1728) one by one in the Juniata shop always sounded dumb to me. And unless they remove the railing, I don't really see a forklift operation being straight-forward at all.
    22 Jun, 01:53 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    The only part of the NS discussion from the last CC that could be relied on is the "We've scheduled a review meeting in mid June...(to) discuss next steps". I take that to mean that regardless of whether the train is moving around the yard by the time of the meeting, they will have significant business to discuss. Maybe this meeting happened already. While TG is the worst cheerleader I have ever witnessed, it will be informative to hear the tone of his voice and choice of words when answering the question, "So how did the meeting with NSC go?". The ultimate question surrounding NSC is not whether the NS999 will be publicly displayed this summer, but rather, when will NSC indicate their intentions? If Valleywood is right, and NSC is already pretty advanced in the proving process, the path to profitability that the market is looking for may come not from a sale or a working prototype, but from a statement of intent from NSC.
    22 Jun, 02:29 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    Edmund,

     

    "The expectation is at the locomotives will be on the road the first week in June."

     

    I guess I was gullible in assuming that it was June 2014. I feel like a fool.
    23 Jun, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    To be fair, TG was likely simply relaying the timetable that he first heard from NSC. He was obviously informed about the NS-999 well before us or AltoonaWorks were, and their meeting was scheduled for mid-June. Any delays to the schedule is out of his hands and has little bearing on his prognostication abilities.
    23 Jun, 02:05 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, "Inasmuch as he had just squeaked under the wire to meet his last date commitment..."

     

    But he didn't and admitted that the contract he got was not what he was looking for as "significant orders". So I'll still take him to task for not returning with the picnic basket he felt was assured. This does not restrict me from being grateful that he spotted a fresh killed squirrel which he brought back to fry up in order to keep the hunger pains a bay a little longer.

     

    Again I'll emphasize that if he communicated better I'd have no right to feel as I do towards his abilities. I'd still be disappointed perhaps but not in his continued inability to meet what I feel are metrics that play poorly on his capabilities. Metrics he is setting for himself.
    22 Jun, 02:10 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (787) | Send Message
     
    Appoligies if this has been posted prior.

     

    "Germany breaks 3 solar power records in 2 weeks.
    Storage is indeed growing, and costs will come down more and more as production scales up. 4,000 new battery storage systems were added in Germany since a German incentive for residential lithium-ion battery systems was implemented about a year ago. This is the same sort of incentive that drove the country's solar growth and the resulting takeoff of the global solar energy era."

     

    http://bit.ly/1pYSZyq
    22 Jun, 04:40 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    For anyone that is interested in some basic stats on BySolar's activity in New Jersey, I have assembled the following:

     

    Selected Details for Completed New Jersey Solar Installations as of April 30, 2014, for BySolar Inc.

     

    Total Number of Projects ----------------------- 18
    Total System Size in KW - dc ------------- 686.595
    Smallest System Size in KW - dc ----------- 2.200
    Largest System Size in KW - dc ---------- 252.720
    Average System Size in KW - dc ----------- 38.144
    Median System Size in KW - dc ------------- 6.720
    Mode for System Size in KW - dc ----------- 4.200
    Range in System Size in KW - dc -------- 250.520
    Mid-Range in System Size in KW - dc --- 127.460
    Number of Commercial Projects ---------------- 6
    Number of Residential Projects ---------------- 12

     

    Selected Details for Completed New Jersey Commercial Solar Installations as of April 30, 2014, for BySolar Inc.

     

    Number of Commercial Projects ---------------- 6
    Total System Size in KW - dc ----------- 514.935
    Smallest System Size in KW - dc -------- 11.440
    Largest System Size in KW - dc -------- 252.720
    Average System Size in KW - dc --------- 85.823
    Median System Size in KW - dc ---------- 64.506
    Mode for System Size in KW - dc --------- 0.000
    Range in System Size in KW - dc ------- 241.280
    Mid-Range in System Size in KW - dc -- 132.080

     

    Selected Details for Completed New Jersey Residential Solar Installations as of April 30, 2014, for BySolar Inc.
    Number of Residential Projects --------------- 12
    Total System Size in KW - dc ----------- 171.660
    Smallest System Size in KW - dc ---------- 2.200
    Largest System Size in KW - dc --------- 115.200
    Average System Size in KW - dc ---------- 14.305
    Median System Size in KW - dc ------------ 4.840
    Mode for System Size in KW - dc ---------- 4.250
    Range in System Size in KW - dc -------- 113.000
    Mid-Range in System Size in KW - dc ---- 58.700

     

    As of April 30, 2014, BySolar has two projects in New Jersey. These were accepted on October 7, 2013, and they are both commercial projects. They are 1) AH REALTY ASST LLC for 575.250 KW - dc and 2) AH LLC for 126.750 KW - dc. Both of these projects are being installed in the city of Hillside

     

    As of April 30, 2014, there are 4,096 solar projects in the pipeline in NJ. Out of those 4,096 solar projects, there are only 52 solar projects that are larger in KW than the 575 Kw of BySolar's. The top 44 projects in NJ are equal to or greater than 1,000,000 KW. The largest project in NJ is in Franklin, and is for FRANKLIN SOLAR W3-077 LLC, and the installer is EFFISOLAR DEVELOPMENT LLC. That project is for 33,283.200 KW.

     

    According to the records for completed BySolar projects, it can take anywhere from six months and up to two years from the date of project acceptance to the completion date. Most of their projects have taken about a year from acceptance to completion.

     

    The two projects that BySolar has in the pipeline as of April 30, 2014, total more in KW than all the solar projects that they have done in NJ to date.
    22 Jun, 07:11 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    Edit to my own post (SA timed out on me)

     

    The following sentence reads:
    The top 44 projects in NJ are equal to or greater than 1,000,000 KW.

     

    It should read: The top 44 projects in NJ are equal to or greater than 1,000.000 KW.

     

    Those projects that are for 1,000.000 KW or more total
    302,589.101 KW - dc.
    22 Jun, 07:36 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1041) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for that 393748.

     

    Having lived in Irvington and Maplewood and worked in Newark and Elizabeth I believe there is a large Shoprite warehouse facility in Hillside.

     

    I may be off but if BySolar but I thought there was a mention it was for a food company and a distribution facility that would need refridgeration makes a lot of sense.
    23 Jun, 07:30 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    About 70% of the Axionistas who responded are underwater, according the survey. I thought it would have been higher

     

    http://svy.mk/T2dD23
    22 Jun, 10:46 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    Not surprising, but even 50% underwater is not as bad as late 2007- early 2009 in the NASDAQ, and about half as bad as mid 2000 to mid 2002 in the NASDAQ, so if you want to bet on technology and "diversify" the index markets can still burn you. A serious win for AXPW means 1000% gains and up, or more than 10X upside that can be expected from the index. I believe that a 20 million dollar market cap on 200 million shares was an absolute absurdly low bottom for this company.
    23 Jun, 12:47 AM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (723) | Send Message
     
    Rick, do you have any sense as to weighting of those holders? ie: what percentage of shares are underwater.

     

    Older holders may have continued to average down yet continue to watch it fall.

     

    Not that I did that of course . . . . .
    23 Jun, 09:25 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    How does one participate in the survey? I went to the page via the link and it just showed the survey but no way to vote. I signed in and still nothing. I could not find a tab to search for a survey. Any suggestions?

     

    Is the survey closed?
    23 Jun, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    Link was put up 6/18. Survey still open.

     

    http://svy.mk/1pg4qhd

     

    This sharing link may display more information than the one above a few comments earlier: http://svy.mk/1wn5cgB

     

    I do not have any information other than the results-link I posted. Of course, the standard caveats of non-random selection, small sample size, liars, and no qualification or identity of participants apply; this is essentially a useless survey for entertainment purposes only. The only restriction is one vote per IP address. It would not be hard for a thousand yahoos to enter all sorts of nonsense, or even true facts.

     

    I do state I have not done anything to create false data or otherwise corrupt the results.
    23 Jun, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2804) | Send Message
     
    Rick - makes sense.

     

    Gives reason for the churn expressed in the reading herein day after day being like a walk in the cemetery reading the tombstones: only the names and dates change; story is pretty much the same, except for a new addition now and then which is fresh.

     

    Somewhat justifies or warrants the search for a new route to walk (and/or a better screening/selection process).
    23 Jun, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    That worked Rick and I took the survey. Thank you. It is now 71.43% underwater. :-)
    23 Jun, 11:37 AM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    -->> PbC Believer

     

    The Gou material was modelling the UB and the PbC. He did not include field test results comparisons to a LB or VRLA or a lead acid battery w/carbonaceous additives.

     

    Gou's work was intended to provide a model for batteries using both a battery electrode and a capacitive electrode. The intent was to develop a model to be used in the design of such a hybrid battery device. The model is to be used in the design phase, well before a physical model or prototype is made.

     

    He did not take any existing UltraBattery or any existing PbC and test them for field performance, such as cycle life, DCA, and self discharge. Nor did he test them under any existing testing protocols, such as EUCAR, SHCHEVP, or the DKE EN-50342-6, which is used in the Axion White Paper.

     

    His material examines the internal dynamics of these new hybrid devices. The model that he has constructed is what would be used to make incremental or generational improvements to these hybrid battery devices. So, battery companies such as Exide, JCI, Axion, and East Penn, etc., would use his model to design batteries that would have better performance in the field, and such better performance would be exhibited by all the various testing protocols, such as cycle life, DCA, et cetera.

     

    In short, the Gou material is focussed on the design phase, and not the field testing results of a prototype or of a finished product.

     

    On Dr. Buiel's comments on the UB charge and discharge behaviour, it is hard to reconcile those with the Gou material. In a close and detailed reading of those comments, Dr. Buiel talks as if the UB had only one negative with a carbon additive.

     

    From the link that you had provided in the previous concentrator, I was able to track down a paper written in 2006 by Dr. Lam, the inventor of the UB. IIUC, in that paper he describes a charge - discharge profile for a UB with two negative (one lead, one carbon) electrodes, and the charge - discharge profile that he outlines in that section of the paper closely matches with what Dr. Buiel had said in January of 2013. That same charge - discharge profile descibed by Dr. Lam also appears to match some of what Gou describes.

     

    BTW, in his comments, Dr. Buiel also expressed a wish for a comparison test of the UB and the PbC.
    23 Jun, 03:24 AM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    User - Mathematical models like this one built by Gou are never relied upon by experienced engineers or profit minded corporations until validation testing has proven the model to be a reasonably accurate predictor of the critical performance characteristics over a wide range of anticipated design variation. Without validation, such a model is nothing more than a hypothesis. Given that the UB battery performance data has been published for at least one design iteration, I am surprised that no effort has been made to at least begin the validation process with that data.
    On a more general note, do you think that East Penn would be as involved with this UB battery as they are if they did not believe that it offered some variety of marketable performance advantage over the wide variety of LABs that they have made and sold for decades? Those who manage East Penn have a proven record of success in this industry and to discount this UB battery out of had as some on this board seem prone to do seems terribly unwise.
    23 Jun, 07:32 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I think everyone who actively participates in this forum understands that energy storage is a very big tent with lots of room for a wide variety of competing solutions. What you interpret as a dismissal of the Ultrabattery is, more often than not, recognition that a Venn Diagram that compares the best attributes of the PbC and the best attributes of the Ultrabattery doesn't have a huge amount of overlap. The Ultrabattery is a fine product with a wide variety of potential uses. The respective sweet spots for the Ultrabattery and the PbC, however, are very different.
    23 Jun, 08:09 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    Remember the video tape war between VHS and Beta?
    VHS being good enough beat out the better performer Beta so, a better product is not a sure win.
    What we need is a highly visible success to draw attention to the product. One of the reasons NS is of such interest.
    It is hoped that ePower will provide the same visibility but its size doesn't give it the same weight as NS, for moving the market.
    23 Jun, 08:16 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    "The Ultrabattery is a fine product", but not for the frequency regulation market. Nor for locomotives or hybrid trucks. Certainly for those apps I think we can dismiss it. Others as seems fit. It would be a drop-in for a cranking LAB.

     

    It also appears to suffer from a poorly-constructed negative "capacitor" electrode and from sulfation problems typical of AGMs.

     

    I like the patent more than the product at this point.
    23 Jun, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    I wonder sometimes if we are not looking at the EP, Ultrabattery issue backwards...

     

    Perhaps EP has been looking at Axion as a potential customer (to ultimately sell extraneous IP to in order to "clean up" the patent picture) rather than as a competitor.

     

    Would the combined IP of Axion and EP be more valuable than the two separately?
    23 Jun, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    Good reply John but .... (enough said on this)

     

    Re. Venn Charts - The marketing guys might make use of Venn charts but the engineers need things more akin to Ragone plots. The engineers working for the PbC's prospective customers need complete performance characterization data for this great battery. The investment market needs data that proves the superiority of the PbC battery for certain applications in no uncertain terms, an indisputable value proposition based on the superiority of the PbC's cost and performance attributes.

     

    http://bit.ly/X5YDzB

     

    This 2008 article makes a crude attempt at doing some of that but I can't help but believe that far better marketing documents for each of this battery's target applications should have been published in the intervening six years.

     

    John, I can't recall a single Axion marketing document published in any form or at any time that does justice to this PbC battery from a marketing perspective. If you have anything that you think contradicts that opinion, I would surely like to be reminded of the existence of such.

     

    Maybe next year? :-)
    23 Jun, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    -->> PbC Believer

     

    As I have already mentioned previously, Gou compared his model's results to the empirical data that Penn State University had from their own testing of the UB. He did not do a complete side by side comparison, but the data that he did compare was enough to show that his model works quite well.

     

    Also, in order to speed up the search for new battery tech, researchers are now using chemical modelling to try to find the next big thing in battery chemistry. There are papers already out on this development in research.
    23 Jun, 01:12 PM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    User - Glad to hear that the model at least jives with the present design. I had a hard time believing that a PhD thesis could pass muster without at least that level of validation. I did not read his thesis because it offers me no entertainment value and I have no financial interest in batteries other than the PbC where all my 'venture' category investments are quite literally "tied up".

     

    Isn't science wonderful, I sure hope that some marketeer gets this PbC battery off the ground before the an even better battery is discovered.
    23 Jun, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • rhyse12
    , contributor
    Comments (187) | Send Message
     
    The continued desire for a " one size fits all" solution is an endless tragic comedy on display...basically every where today.
    It is brilliant when it happens. What makes it brilliant is the rare occurrence of a "one size fits all" solution.

     

    I own this stock, and I am underwater. But the tech is good, and there exist parties engaged in testing and applying the tech. The current reverse split plan to ensure another another round of financing is pretty solid. The hard part is done, getting companies to play with the "toy". If it holds up to investigation, success and profit will follow. But that investigation will proceed at a pace beyond the control of AXPW.

     

    Progress doesn't follow a timetable.
    23 Jun, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    PbC Believer,

     

    Again with the marketing angle. We're thinking your background is sales?

     

    Venn diagrams are useful for displaying connections between data sets of no particular origin, while Ragone plots are arguably more useful to ESS marketing efforts than they ever could be to engineers and electrochemists.

     

    Now what do we all know about salesmen, in general terms?
    23 Jun, 02:36 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    PbC "Believer", re':

     

    "I did not read his thesis because it offers me no entertainment value and I have no financial interest in batteries other than the PbC ..."

     

    Half the paper was about modeling the PbC. The other half was about modeling the UB. The extensive design ratio data presented as part of the UB modeling was highly instructive and relevant to the PbC.

     

    You didn't read the thesis, so of course you didn't know that, we get that, but I'm certain your failure to do so had nothing to do with its entertainment value.

     

    I'll end by saying you are certainly entertaining.
    23 Jun, 02:47 PM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    Edmund - I consider the endless sarcasm that you send in my direction to be overly personal and fundamentally abusive, but apparently the monitor in charge of this somewhat positively biased Instablog does not see it that way.
    C'est la vie.
    23 Jun, 04:11 PM Reply Like
  • PbC Believer
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    Rhyse - I am finding it very difficult to address the issue of what the marketing types within a company like Axion can and must do to accelerate their projects within the political structure of their prospective customers without sounding supercritical of those individuals at Axion who have been less than effective at accomplishing that task. No a company in Axion's circumstance does not CONTROL its destiny but it is amazing what those with the right talents can do to influence their destiny.
    23 Jun, 07:09 PM Reply Like
  • rhyse12
    , contributor
    Comments (187) | Send Message
     
    PBC-
    Without inside knowledge, we can only assume. There is one critical factor that holds to this date.
    The battery has endured serious testing from the auto industry, and passed.
    The battery is undergoing serious testing from the rail side, so far so good.
    The battery is now undergoing serious testing from a concern in automotive " trucking" - for lack of a better label. Granted, the best conduit for information on the "trucking" process is also the biggest supporter of the battery, but so far so good. Sorry JP, but it is what it is...
    The best marketing has always been a product, tested by the independent end user, that delivers on the promise made by marketing. So far, so good. But their remains further to travel.
    In the end, the engineers will determine if the tech is worthy of purchase. Then the haggling over price. That the tech is in the hands of these outside engineers is good news. Not great news, but good news.
    24 Jun, 06:24 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    rhyse12 - I dispute your statement that the PbC was "passed" by the auto industry, "passed by" yes. There are no sales or purchase orders, no fleet testing, no industry gossip, no buzz. Outside of Axionville, no one has heard of the 16 volt PbC.

     

    The battery may have passed a specific, arbitrary testing protocol, but for any number of reasons that has not turned into sales, now or in the near to mid-future. "Passing", to me, indicates commercial success; so far, zilch by autos.
    24 Jun, 07:21 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    I have to agree with RK. Sure seems the top 5 Asian OEM that was supposed to start fleet testing within 6 months two years ago "passed by" Axion.
    24 Jun, 07:53 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    How would you know if fleet testing was on-going? It's not like they will drive around with "Axion Inside" painted on the outside of the test cars.
    24 Jun, 08:12 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    gt - It's hard to fleet test if they don't buy any batteries.

     

    Try Googling "axion battery -site:seekingalpha.com -site:axionpower.com " in News (Within 1 year)
    http://bit.ly/V8Zgeb

     

    3 hits. Wow. None are autos.
    24 Jun, 08:49 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Automakers typically keep their fleet testing under tight wraps. The only news one can reasonably expect to see from an automaker is a design win. In fact, public disclosure that BMW tested the PbC and liked the performance was an extraordinary event and its own right. The absence of news on fleet testing proves nothing.
    24 Jun, 09:10 AM Reply Like
  • Nicu Mihalache
    , contributor
    Comments (1081) | Send Message
     
    This is a converse of what I call the fridge light syndrome: if I always see the light when I open the door, it must be always on.

     

    The converse: the things I do not see do not exist.
    24 Jun, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    A while back, UFO "photos" - grainy, out of focus, unclear origin or location - were circulated as evidence of extra-terrestrials. Now, with hundreds of millions of high quality cameras/mobile phones carried 24 hours a day that can authenticate location, modification, and time, have low light capability, autofocus, and never run out of film, UFO sightings have but disappeared except for the psychotic and "true believers".

     

    Likewise, back in the auto "Big Three" days, secrecy was pretty easy. Now put those same cell phone tools and Internet distribution in the hands of countless bloggers and ever-curious enthusiasts, the likelihood of keeping absolute secrecy on hundreds of cars driving around is near zero.

     

    The absence of evidence puts Axion fleet testing into the same category as real UFOs. OK, not definitively impossible, but call me skeptical.

     

    [Note for the under-imaginative: Obviously there won't be a "Axionized!" placard. Imagine a video clip from someone tailing an exhaust pipe, noticing it keeps turning off at stop lights, yet the driver looks comfortable in 95+ deg heat with all the windows closed? Hmmmm, hotel loads. Engine starts at every traffic light? Hmmmm, start-stop. AC stays on while refueling car? ....]
    24 Jun, 09:36 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    Some arbitrary fleet test numbers:

     

    Imagine 100 cars drive 50,000 miles at 50 mph average; that's 100,000 hours of road time. In suburban or urban driving (start-stop territory), let's suppose 1,000 people per hour see the vehicle, about 16 per minute. Includes on-coming traffic, buses, pedestrians, and people just looking out the window.

     

    So we might have 100 million sightings during a fleet test. If only one in a million notice the car, that is 100 people who might be interested to take a picture or video, or listen to the exhaust.

     

    In addition, how many people end up knowing about a 100 car fleet test? Gas station attendants, engineers, spouses, mechanics, tail car drivers, tow truck operators, policemen reporting an accident, valet parkers, car wash attendants, passengers in a taxi, etc. They ALL can keep secrets? No anonymous ego-boosting blogs? No wannabe-Snowdens?

     

    Third, there is an extremely dedicated and highly curious team of Axionistas continuously looking for any independent verification of fleet testing. None found.
    24 Jun, 10:13 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    A relatively recent BMW fleet test of AGM batteries was discussed at length in a Journal of Power Sources article. They used two fleets of 30 cars each – a police fleet and an airport limo fleet. The cars bore no special markings and were indistinguishable from other police cars and airport limos. Automakers are very good at drawing attention when they want it and avoiding attention when it's in their best interest. I don't know about anybody else but I've never been able to draw any conclusions about the electrical system of a car by looking at the body.
    24 Jun, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4206) | Send Message
     
    Absence of any revenue from unexplained/undisclosed PbC sales speaks volumes.
    24 Jun, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Superman befriended me for awhile and was willing to look into vehicle trunks near the primary R&D center for BMW in Germany. Thus far he's only reported one dead body and a new and improved frozen wiener schnitzel from Aldi's. Alas no coconite or kryptonite. He did however admit to being distracted by some rather beautiful fräuleins so there is a margin of error in the assessment.
    24 Jun, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Over the last eight quarters Axion has generated an average of $425,000 per quarter from sales of PbC and specialty batteries. Except for sales to NS, Bysolar and ePower, we have no detail on what the specific sales components of that revenue might be.

     

    Thirty PbCs would represent less than $15,000 in revenue and sixty PbCs would represent less than $30,000. Either way the number would not be material enough to require line-item disclosure if the customer wanted things kept quiet.

     

    It's fair to say that we stockholders don't have a clue about what's going on behind closed doors. We have no basis to claim that nothing is going on.
    24 Jun, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    JP, we'll probably disagree on the significance, but Axion's policy of combining specialty battery sales (for antiques and race cars) together with PbC sales is, to me, a willful (but legal) obfuscation on information important to investors. We cannot tell if there are ANY PbC sales, except for specific press release notifications.

     

    I completely agree with you that customer-specific sales data are often, and appropriately, combined to obscure details.
    24 Jun, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    JP wrote: "It's fair to say that we stockholders don't have a clue about what's going on behind closed doors. We have no basis to claim that nothing is going on."

     

    A fleet road test cannot be done inside closed doors; it is too big (and irrelevant) to do on a test track at night. Lack of evidence in this case is basis (not proof) of not happening.

     

    Of course, there may be, and should be, lots of other stuff happening that is inherently not so visible.
    24 Jun, 10:59 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Axion reports all battery sales as a single number. It separately discloses sales under the flooded battery contract as a required line item in MD&A. Nothing else is material enough to merit separate disclosure. While we might like to see more detail, that level of detail would be inappropriate under GAAP and SEC regulations.
    24 Jun, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    I don't know who here may live out this way, but in the past year, while driving around on the FM roads around Midland-Abiliene-Big Spring, I've passed or been passed by some road testing. One was a column of Malibu's, probably 30 (if my son's count was correct) and another was nearly 50 of a type I didn't recognize in the twilight. What were they testing? I don't know. I could only hope there was a favored battery of mine inside.
    24 Jun, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • Retired Aviator
    , contributor
    Comments (1883) | Send Message
     
    Rick> There is an extremely dedicated and highly curious throng trying to get a glimpse of Apple's gadget pipeline. The throng is a million times greater than the 'Axion curious' and the development teams probably number thousands, yet Apple keeps its R&D under pretty tight wraps.
    24 Jun, 03:36 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    RK
    We know that ePower is testing their truck. They are not making a secret of it and yet where are the 3rd party photos and blog entries?
    If there is nothing on something so obvious, I'm not surprised there is nothing on something intentionally being hidden.
    24 Jun, 07:01 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    IF it is in fact being intentionally hidden or they didn't test it and just move on.
    24 Jun, 09:24 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    JP, once again, you get the Incredibly Patient Teacher of the Year award.

     

    Congrats. Don't know how you can keep doing it.
    24 Jun, 10:30 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (292) | Send Message
     
    Tha's right, JP. Ford had a pickup truck in the market at construction companies with an aluminium body...nobody knew...not even the drivers (i think!).
    25 Jun, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    No mention of our favorite supercabattery. Oh well.

     

    IDTechEx: Supercapacitors can Destroy the Lithium-ion Battery Market

     

    http://on.mktw.net/1wm...
    23 Jun, 09:03 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    CDEL has a 15 cent bid for 401k shrs, and BNCH 15.02 for 100k. Another good chance for someone to bail or sell down if they desire.
    23 Jun, 09:56 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    Update: ETRF also has a 15 cent bid for 100k shrs.

     

    2nd update: 35k shrs of BNCH's bid was taken. So, overall, we have 576k shrs visibly bid between 15.02 and 15.
    23 Jun, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    May those Bids sit there and rot.
    23 Jun, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    DRich, thinking rotten thoughts?
    -
    And down in TX.

     

    Welcome to Texas – America’s energy storage laboratory

     

    "Oncor’s latest project includes a set of five lithium-ion batteries that are stored in seperate green refrigerator-sized containers. These batteries will be installed over the summer to provide backup power to traffic lights, schools, and a fire station. All told, this $500,000 project includes enough battery capacity to store 50 kilowatts (kW) of electricity and are intended to be used when something goes wrong – whether a branch falling on a transmission line or an unexpected equipment malfunction."

     

    http://bit.ly/1yFogc2
    23 Jun, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    $10,000/kW seems very pricey to me. I know there are inverters and other electronics involved plus labor. But am I missing something here?

     

    Our last order was for 4 PC units putting out aprx 500Kw for a total of $1.1 mil. Am I mixing apples and oranges. Kilowatts are kilowatts no mater the battery chemistry, no?
    23 Jun, 11:46 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Masi, w/o detail we don't know what is included in the cost. Could be a whole bunch of rewiring and controls associated with isolating specific functions to create microgrids that they wish to keep running when the larger grid goes down. If it was just for the UPS you're right, very expensive..
    23 Jun, 11:54 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    Given their proximity to active traffic areas, perhaps they have (logically) elected to use one of the very expensive but relatively stable and safe LI varieties?
    23 Jun, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Seems to me the wiring would run parallel to the existing wiring with some sort of a switch to kick in when the normal power supply is cut off. Simplified, similar to emergency lights in most buildings that have those 6v batteries. Can it be that much different than our PC's kicking in for a building losing it's power. But even more than that IIUC, our units regulate power constantly which seems a whole lot more complicated and needing more electronics.

     

    I'm not an electrical engineer, but I've wired many many houses and your axillary power connects at the fuse box just as your normal power does. Before or after the meter depending on if you want to sell it back to your utility. This is in my layman's terms but the equipment is complicated not the function.
    23 Jun, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    I understand homes are different because you could do the switching with a manual switching box and businesses would (for liability and reliabilty reasons) opt for automation.

     

    I guess when the taxpayer is paying, money is no object. And, someone has very greazy palms right now.
    23 Jun, 12:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Masi, No detail so we don't know. Could be things wired in numerous different networks now being pulled into one microgrid, underground wiring, costs to cover traffic flow while the work is being done and and and.

     

    Approvals and engineering firms and licenses and inspectors and government hand shake dinners and and and. :-(

     

    Edit:

     

    http://bit.ly/15PFLFA
    23 Jun, 12:37 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    I love that song.
    23 Jun, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    Yes, "provide backup power to traffic lights, schools, and a fire station."
    That means price is no object because tax payers are footing the bill.
    23 Jun, 01:52 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    ii - correction to your quote from the article:

     

    "... this $500,000 project includes enough battery capacity to store ***250*** kilowatts...". In other words, $2/watt.
    24 Jun, 07:47 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1038) | Send Message
     
    It bugs me when they talk about storage and then use watts to state the capacity. Watts is a power rate, not a unit of storage.
    24 Jun, 09:37 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    ngs, hence Ragone plots.

     

    You can store energy or power. The same disconnect would occur if they talked about storing power and used units of kWh
    24 Jun, 09:51 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Looks like they will not have much shelf life sitting there.
    24 Jun, 09:53 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    kW is a perfectly reasonable metric to use. It is simply a base-ten multiple of a fundamental SI unit (J/s).

     

    kWh is a not-so-good one because it considers "hours", which create clumsy conversions, sounds exactly like kW, creating confusion, and doesn't tell you how many max kW the system can discharge at.

     

    A more useful metric would be to simply state both the total energy in joules and the max power in watts. Then you can calculate the number of seconds, hours, or whatever that the system can discharge for at a given power up to the maximum wattage.
    24 Jun, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Individuals tend to think of electricity in kWh terms because it's the variable billing unit for residential power.

     

    In stationary systems the kWh metric is pretty useless because none of the high-value applications discharge for hours at a time. Kilowatt seconds or minutes would be a far more useful number, but getting the public to think in terms that are different from what they know is hard.
    24 Jun, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Through 11:23 Buy:Sell 1:35.67 (02.73% "buys"). 3K bought VWAP $ 0.1541, 107K sold VWAP $0.1507.

     

    HardToLove
    23 Jun, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    "We are excited to announce the launch of GridMarket.com, AGRION's joint venture with Con Edison, Viridity, NYCEDC, NYSERDA, EaglePicher, DemandEnergy, Axion Power, Enerdel, Con Edison Solutions, Arista Power, and other core partners in our Energy Storage Taskforce."

     

    http://bit.ly/1yFPkrE

     

    Gridmarket.com

     

    http://bit.ly/1yFPlMa
    23 Jun, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    ii,
    A quick glance and I see another battery company in the consortium, Enerdel (li-on). The benjamins are probably more than big enough for everybody.
    23 Jun, 01:42 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1038) | Send Message
     
    Interesting website. No mention of Axion products in the case studies or list of technologies. If Axion really is a partner in this, they should remedy that as fast as possible. They need to get their onsite cube and the Bysolar installations added to that interactive map.
    23 Jun, 01:53 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    I see Axion Power named but not on the "Attendees list'.
    23 Jun, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    Despite being mentioned in the blurb, I don't see anyone listed as attending from Axion. (This already happened June 19)

     

    ZBB, Beacon, Eos, and Primus were there in person.

     

    Not to mention Moody's Investor Services, GE, Seimens, the vice president of BNP Paribas.

     

    This really makes me mad. Do they ever leave New Castle?
    23 Jun, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    ii - nice find. Also, nice to see Viridity and Axion publicly mentioned in the same breath again.
    23 Jun, 02:08 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1842) | Send Message
     
    PY - it was just a webinar to demo the website. No reason for Axion to attend. No doubt many on the list didn't actually phone in, or did and said nothing.
    23 Jun, 02:15 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Metro, Eagle Picher sells lithium ion. Arista is an integrator of power systems located in my city. One of the Arista execs went to Eagle Picher last year and they are now aligned somehow. I saw awhile ago they got a contract in NYC.

     

    I did work w/ EP back in the late 80's and early 90's before they went into receivership due to the asbestos mess. They never did any work w/ asbestos other than w/ the US Navy. But they theorize some contractor took some left over material and used it elsewhere. Cost them the whole company as it went into the asbestos trust fund for future claims. They used to do lead acid batteries then.

     

    Edit:

     

    http://bit.ly/1yG2zsp

     

    http://aristapower.com
    23 Jun, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    NGS> looks like the map is limited to NY state. The BySolar install is in NJ.

     

    Project 1 in the list is described as Advanced Lead Acid and "ice storage" which is related to the HVAC system (make ice at night and use it to boost the carnot efficiency of the A/C during the day). It has no address or pin-marker in the map.

     

    The only other project mentioning Advanced Lead Acid is the Barclay Tower, which is completed, and was installed by Demand Energy which is a battery-agnostic systems integrator.

     

    http://bit.ly/1yGdPVD

     

    "Since the original two MWh of storage was installed, Glenwood has identified through testing that from an economic perspective, the optimal storage size for the Barclay is actually 400 kWh. So the management firm plans to move the excess storage to set up systems in other properties."

     

    -Take-away: the reduction in the total energy capacity of the PbC battery as a result of replacing the NAM with carbon sheeting is not a problem per say and should be a fine trade-off for the improved charging and power characteristics of the battery
    23 Jun, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    Here is an example of "ice storage" for HVAC. http://bit.ly/1yGfMl5
    23 Jun, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    In HRPSOC applications, the NAM of the lead-acid battery sulfates and shorts. PbC eliminates this problem while accepting higher currents.
    The PbC battery should also have inherent lifetime advantages over AGM on the positive plate as well because:
    1) The acid concentration is lower than Pb-Pb.
    2) It is not necessary to overcharge the battery to eliminate sulfation problems on the NAM.
    3) The voltage drop is actually beneficial to reduce the effect of corrosion.

     

    However, it seems the jury is still out on how to effectively manage the positive plate "creep" problem which will eventually (within 10 years) destroy any lead-acid battery. The good news is that Axion seems to have a lock on the negative plate, and any advances in positive plate technology are not a competitor to PbC but rather a good candidate to supply the negative plate to.
    23 Jun, 04:41 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Let's not forget that Axion also has a lock (i.e., a patent) on *positive* electrode current collector grid improvements that they claim address the problems associated with the positive plate.

     

    http://bit.ly/1ltlwsn
    Electrode with reduced resistance grid and hybrid energy storage device having same (pub. 2012)
    23 Jun, 06:41 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4673) | Send Message
     
    First sighting of actual marketing? Even if it is by and mostly for the benefit of others, I'll take it.
    23 Jun, 01:47 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    Interesting? Exactly one 2.5K trade, a buy for $0.1520 at 15:59:30 to set the closing price, and we have a daily short sales volume of 2.5K.

     

    I couldn't catch what MM offered 10K at $0.152 at 15:55 (offer was sitting at $0.1539 AFAIK), 10K makes me suspect ATDF, but others have jumped like that off and on.

     

    Buy:sell 1:34.32 (02.82% "buys"), 5.5K buys. W/o that 2.5K closing trade 3K "buys" and buy:sell 1:62.92 (01.54% "buys").

     

    Short % 1.28%.

     

    We've got to tamp down this buying enthusiasm. :-\

     

    HardToLove
    23 Jun, 05:49 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Starting to wonder if all the paint will be carried away by insect landings/departures before it ever dries. I'm afraid no news is NOT good news.

     

    The task remains sales of a significant nature. Maybe a big wet kiss from NSC, a partner or automotive would work as well? So far we are safe from having to count too much money and mononucleosis. So I guess we sit back and watch the fight with a probable split decision as the outcome. I'll try to contain my excitement.
    23 Jun, 06:06 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    Nobody beats Axionista paint watching ability.

     

    I know of several Axionistas who have watched every hour of the World Cup tournament without blinking once.

     

    Check Norris must own Axion stock.
    23 Jun, 06:40 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    TB, Chuck's brother? ;-{I
    23 Jun, 07:14 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    His greedy twin.
    23 Jun, 07:39 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9984) | Send Message
     
    I'd like to see an oil painting of an obfuscated Axionista deliberating as to whether or not to board a train that hasn't yet reached the station.
    23 Jun, 08:05 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (880) | Send Message
     
    Would the other person in the picture clasping their hand and smiling be trying to pull them on or have pushed them off?
    23 Jun, 08:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    I got some good laughs subsequent to TB's post. I think all semi directionally correct. By trade or interest, I suspect Check is a cartoonist on the side. Maybe the next Picasso, but in animation? I theorize TB, being a wonderful artist, may have rubbed elbows w/ him and thus the Freudian slip.

     

    http://bit.ly/Tqsp2Z
    24 Jun, 01:07 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5083) | Send Message
     
    SunPower Offers Batteries to Hold Solar Power Until Night
    http://bloom.bg/1pdKoZe
    24 Jun, 05:14 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Does anybody else find this quote curious?

     

    "The builder already includes a 1.4-kilowatt solar system as a standard feature at its Vicenza community in Irvine, saving an average of about $216 a month, or roughly $25,600 over ten years."

     

    With six hours of daily insolation a 1.4 kW solar panel can only generate 252 kW per month under optimal conditions.

     

    Do you really think they're paying $0.85 per kWh in Irvine?
    24 Jun, 07:57 AM Reply Like
  • Deamiter
    , contributor
    Comments (161) | Send Message
     
    It sounds to me like the reporter put two very different numbers together -- the "standard" solar power system and the average savings (including much larger system).

     

    Of course, he may have just lost a decimal point in there.
    24 Jun, 09:39 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    To my eye there seemed a couple of significant points:

     

    1) They specifically talk about backup power available during blackouts. This is a big change from most current residential grid-tied solar systems which are (maddeningly) rendered useless when the grid goes down..

     

    2) Mentions the pushback in California solar w/ storage is getting as far as connecting to the grid. Seems like it could be an issue...
    24 Jun, 01:42 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I just published a new article titled, "Grid-Scale Energy Storage; Why Working Capacity And Cycle Duration Matter."

     

    http://bit.ly/1jcjR6v

     

    It's all part of my kinder gentler Petersen approach. I've grown weary of discussing the senseless and am returning to my roots.
    24 Jun, 08:04 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Battery technology grows to meet demands of renewable energy

     

    http://bit.ly/V91DxJ

     

    Edit: FYI Axion inside.
    24 Jun, 09:15 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    ii - another nice find.
    24 Jun, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1533) | Send Message
     
    Wow! Not too shabby.
    24 Jun, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Great to see some recognition and publicity. Although, the article was in error...... This line..... "The company recently sold a 500-kw PowerCube to a New Jersey-based solar installer for $1.1 million, its largest order."..... "a" should be, four... reducing the cost by 75%..

     

    I commented on the error and cut and pasted from the Axion Power article and put in the correction.
    24 Jun, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    Masi,

     

    I believe this blurb is also in error: "PowerCube, which can send up to one megawatt of power for 30 minutes or 10 kilowatts for 10 hours, is about the size of a semi-truck trailer."

     

    Should read *100* kilowatts for 10 hours (I believe)

     

    Since you precipitated the other correction, any chance can you ping them again to fix this one?
    24 Jun, 01:51 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    The relevant link on Axion's site is:

     

    http://bit.ly/1d6vy0y

     

    Kind of an important number for them to have gooned up...
    24 Jun, 02:01 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    48, a megawatt is 1,000 kWs, and 10 x 100 = 1000 the last I counted. I will look for a quote on the Axion site for a reference to refer the author to.

     

    Back in a few.
    24 Jun, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    48, Yeah, I saw that and went uggh. But anyone reading it that matters, IMO, will figure it out. But they will also immediately think about how the article was kinda poorly written.
    24 Jun, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Done 48. Nice catch. Hey, it looks like you were searching for the page with the info as I was. (time entry)
    Is that article taken from our PR company?

     

    It says above the article

     

    "By Michael Sanserino / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette"

     

    but the wording in some of the paragraphs is almost identical to our press releases, except for the errors. How hard can it be to cut and paste?
    24 Jun, 02:57 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Masi, you da man.
    24 Jun, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    No problem. I didn't like that the article was pricing the product at 4x what it is and if they are going to state facts they should be accurate. 10kW is quite paltry compared to 100kW.
    24 Jun, 03:17 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    06/23/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from the blog (up now).
    # Trds: 24, MinTrSz: 500, MaxTrSz: 35000, Vol: 195270, AvTrSz: 8136
    Min. Pr: 0.1502, Max Pr: 0.1544, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1506
    # Buys, Shares: 4 5500, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1532
    # Sells, Shares: 19 188770, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1505
    # Unkn, Shares: 1 1000, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.1520
    Buy:Sell 1:34.32 (02.82% "buys"), DlyShts 2500 (01.28%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 1.32%

     

    The 160K offer at $0.17 was not present today.

     

    However, we had an exorbitantly large bid at $0.15 – 400K from CDEL entered at 09:55 (later made 403K). At 11:25 ETRF piled in with a 100K bid at $0.15 and late in the day ATDF added 17K there, so we had an aggregate 520K bid there. Naturally, no trades went off there – instead the $0.1502 at 100K which BNCH had in from the open acted as the day's low.

     

    The 100K from ETRF and the 17K from ATDF don't raise any flags for me, but the 400K+ from CDEL strikes me as just another case of rotation of orders among market-makers, possibly in an attempt to be a bit stealthy while providing support for selling above $0.15. My thinking is today's CDEL 400K replaced the ATDF 300K we saw 6/17. As was the case with the 300K from ATDF on 6/17 with a 78.6% sell rate, we again had a high sell percentage, 96.7%, and it was paired with yesterday's 79.2%.

     

    VWAP had tried to break the prior trend of continuously creeping lower by posting two consecutive days of a higher VWAP. It was not able to maintain that ...

     

    I still think a seller that really wants out is still in the market because the sell percentage, 96.7%, was even worse than yesterday's 79.2%. There was still no sign of the 300K $0.15 bid from ATDF since then, but it was replaced today by the aggregate 520K bid at $0.15 mentioned above.

     

    Our daily high lost credibility today with one buy of 1K shares for $0.1544 at 9:35. The next lower price, $0.1540 had two trades ...

     

    My short-term descending resistance hit $0.15, AFAICT, today and we managed to barely close above it. If we close above it again today, we can take that line off the chart.

     

    We have a longer-term rising support originating at the low of 2/24 with touches at the lows of 2/25, 5/2 and now today, 6/23. It's paired with a descending resistance originating at the high of 3/10 and having touches at the highs of 5.14 and 5/28. Adding an imagined vertical line at 3/10 forms an isosceles triangle, commonly termed a pennant in traditional TA. Breakout normally occurs from 66% - 75%, or eve later, along the lateral distance. We are well into that area.

     

    Everything I see says we will close below it tomorrow, 6/24, because it is rising and share price is compressing towards $0.15.

     

    One faint hope on the traditional chart is the Bollinger bands. Right now we are in the lower half of the range ($0.1435 - $0.1758) and one always looks for pressure to move back to the mid-point. But both the upper and lower are falling and mid-point could be achieved by the limits moving rather than the price moving. I say the hope is faint because not one of the oscillators I watch has a positive slope offering any support for this hope.

     

    The usual is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    24 Jun, 09:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Stop/start to be standard with V-6 in Jeep Cherokee and I-4 in 2015 Chrysler 200; up to 3% better fuel economy

     

    http://bit.ly/Va1D0n
    24 Jun, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • ecorowe
    , contributor
    Comments (14) | Send Message
     
    I asked a Chrysler contact person about the batteries in these two vehicles; here is her reply. ESS = Engine Start/Stop.

     

    Hi Robert,

     

    The battery is an AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) battery. The only details we are releasing right now are in the press release, there will be more information available as we get closer to production. For competitive reasons we aren’t talking about any future products that may or may not get the ESS technology, just what we have announced today.

     

    Hope this helps, if you want to check back closer to the start of production we should be able to give you more details then.

     

    Best,

     

    Kathy Graham
    Product PR Manager – C and D Segment Vehicles
    Chrysler Group Media Relations
    24 Jun, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Ecorowe!

     

    I would expect they are using the same tech. as the 2013/2014 Dodge Ram pick-up which is an AGM battery. I am tracking implementation in North America as we need to see an interest before we have a chance of getting on an application. So it is good to see the traditional "Big 3" all rolling out simple SS as a first move in the direction which offers more possibilities for PbC. Not looking to suggest we might be surprised by being selected quite yet for this level of electrification. Again, just looking for movement in the right direction.
    24 Jun, 11:37 AM Reply Like
  • ecorowe
    , contributor
    Comments (14) | Send Message
     
    Thanks ii…. I too am glad to see this movement in the right direction. I asked Kathy many questions about the batteries, but she wouldn't "bite". I am wondering how the AGM battery would get recharged. The press release didn't mention regenerative braking. So, I assume the recharging would be done the standard way --- alternator and voltage regulator. I assume this ESS system would NOT be in effect 100% of the time, but only when the battery has sufficient charge to handle the loads. Do you think the Axion PbC has a shot at being used in an ESS system ?
    24 Jun, 01:29 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Axion's PbC is ideally suited to the demands of second generation stop-start systems (a/k/a micro-hybrids) that will turn the engine off at higher speed and use more aggressive charging algorithms to eke out fuel savings of up to 10%. The preferred configuration proposed by Axion is actually a two battery system where a small flooded battery will handle nothing but the starter and a large PbC will carry the rest of the electrical system loads.

     

    While it's a little dated (2011), there's a "Charge Acceptance Solution" whitepaper on the investor page of Axion's website that summarizes the work Axion has completed on micro-hybrid architecture and fuel economy.
    24 Jun, 01:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Ecorowe, Yes, I suspect the SS system will be in line with what they implemented for the Ram pick-up (see attached) . They define it as a "light SS system". In this case the only charging mechanism for the battery is the alternator meaning there is no method for using generation to slow the vehicle. I suspect that the subsequent implementations will be the same.

     

    More a marketing ploy than an attempt at getting better CAFE. I have seen nothing yet to indicate that the US is changing it's drive cycle to include SS performance in the mileage ratings.

     

    I'm not sure the PbC battery is well suited at this level of implementation. I'm also not very happy with the way the system is implemented though due to the battery PSOC issues. Anyway, the reason I don't think it fits is that the battery is not being used at a high enough level to justify the expense of a two battery system which PbC seems to require. This because there is no regenerative deceleration and the electrification of the vehicle is still very immature. I'd like to see the former and more of the latter. This is why I've been watching the industry for things like electric air conditioning compressors and other high energy use migration off the ICE. This is where the better charge acceptance really becomes important.

     

    2014 Ram 1500 HFE With Stop-Start System Overview

     

    http://bit.ly/VjqMWs
    24 Jun, 02:15 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1375) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, ii! I appreciate your contribution regarding watching the industry for more mature electrification of the vehicle.
    24 Jun, 03:19 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    JP, If good news hits before Axion new share issuance is it possible new shares might be issued, or partially issued, on the open market instead of 100% private placement?
    24 Jun, 10:39 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    I'm not entirely clear what you mean by "issued on the open market," so I'm not sure how to respond.

     

    If I were trying to structure an offering for Axion, one of my major goals would be a stock price in the $0.35 range so that I could register an offering on Form S-3 instead of doing a "private placement." The reason is simple. Registered deals are priced closer to the market price than unregistered deals.

     

    In either event, it's not likely that Axion would be able to do a registered deal that was available to the general public as a broadly distributed follow-on offering. Anything is possible, but my current expectations are either a registered direct placement if the stock performs well or an unregistered offering if the price stagnates.
    24 Jun, 12:04 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (415) | Send Message
     
    The implication is that management can sell shares to raise cash into the market on a whim using any or all of the authorized shares. If it were that easy, the PIPE would not have been involved. I don't know what the barriers are, however.
    24 Jun, 12:50 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    I was under the impression that the stock issuance was going to a private equity group or as stock in exchange for cash. If this is the case I wouldn't consider it going onto the open market. If available on what I refer to as the open market the average joe - open market buyers - would be able to buy the new shares.
    My speculation is that if news turns out to be very good and the stock value pops - substantially, perhaps more than we all hope for - how and where new issuance equity is issued may change or vary.
    24 Jun, 03:59 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    The new shares will be sold for cash, but there's no way to know whether they'll end up in the hands of short- or long-term holders. In 2009 I would have sworn the big investors were swinging for the fences with a five-year time horizon. Unfortunately things didn't work out that way. The only good thing about financing transactions that end in a beat down like we've seen for the last four years is that they make managers and stockholders that survive the ordeal tough as a boars nose.
    24 Jun, 04:14 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    Hmm...Boar's nose...I already have "Bourse Nose," as I think we all may.
    24 Jun, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    I'm a long term holder.
    24 Jun, 05:19 PM Reply Like
  • ecorowe
    , contributor
    Comments (14) | Send Message
     
    How dare they (Ecosphere) use our trademarked name (PowerCube) !!

     

    http://bit.ly/ViI0TX
    24 Jun, 01:57 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2429) | Send Message
     
    Axion was a bit late to the trademark party; they only filed "Power cube" two weeks ago. http://bit.ly/1jeMgZJ

     

    It is not a strong trademark - look at all these 39 other trademarked Power Cubes: http://1.usa.gov/1jeMf7X;p_tagrepl~%3A=PARA1%2...

     

    edit: try http://1.usa.gov/1iCttwk

     

    Note #29 by Axion: status "DEAD"

     

    [Note to self: Resist urge to make snarky competency comment]
    24 Jun, 03:20 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    How about:

     

    PowerSlab?

     

    PowerNub?

     

    PowerPlinth?

     

    or my personal favorite:

     

    (sigh, my powers of refrain are so limited...;)

     

    PowerSquat ?
    24 Jun, 03:50 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    Actually, being serious, something like "PowerNode-Flex" might be the most apt and descriptive. As well as a lot less likely to be already taken...
    24 Jun, 04:00 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Who cares?

     

    Trademark protection can very valuable if you're selling a mass market consumer product. They're almost worthless in a business like Axion's.

     

    Hell, PbC is a registered trademark, but that doesn't keep every lead acid battery producer and researcher on the planet from using the term improperly and probably illegally.

     

    Unless you're willing to see Axion raise a ton of money to pay the costs of trademark litigation, it's just one more tempest in a teapot.
    24 Jun, 04:19 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    PowerCuboid, The Six Sided Solid Solution. Packed with performance - not an empty s(h)ell.

     

    http://bit.ly/1jfevHA

     

    http://bit.ly/1jffk35
    24 Jun, 04:43 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Since all three dimensions are not equal, I'd argue that the PowerCube is really a PowerHyperrectangle, a PowerOrthope, a PowerCuboid or perhaps a PowerBrick.

     

    http://bit.ly/1jfgThr

     

    Let's debate geometry for a change. It has to be more fun than wondering "Is it dry yet?"
    24 Jun, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Well don't ask me to do anything with those! lol
    24 Jun, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    Gentlemen, I give you hizzonor the Right Power Parallelepiped! ;)

     

    Seriously though, sure the issue is hardly in the top ten, but purely in the realm of PR and public awareness and discussion, and just like with PbC, which is also a bit over-generic, it's just repeatedly frustrating to see the terms used and abused and gain currency, all pretty much without Axion (with exceptions) getting enough credit...
    24 Jun, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    It's nowhere near as frustrating as a couple hundred large per quarter in legal fees for silly litigation.
    24 Jun, 05:50 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    John, always with the troublesome details! You take the fun right out of grumbling... ;)
    24 Jun, 06:37 PM Reply Like
  • Valleywood
    , contributor
    Comments (723) | Send Message
     
    Sometimes things just ain't worth fighting over.

     

    JP, I recall when Chameleon Computer first came out with their add for a "PC". HP & a whole gaggle of folks no longer around followed about a week later. The entire universe went from "micro computer" to "Personal Computer" in about a month.

     

    IBM did a lot of posturing and war whooping for a few months and suddenly quit. Outside General Counsel for IBM in a disappointed interview with the press outside his office when repeatedly pressed by the TV army said that IBM decided their position was "an exasperated screw it."

     

    Life can really be fun.
    25 Jun, 08:18 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2802) | Send Message
     
    I'll take the free advertising for the PbC any day, if Axion can then trademark/use, "The Original PbC" and such. "The Only Pure-Carbon PbC. Still."
    25 Jun, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Curious, Anyone do any snooping around on this yet?

     

    Multilink Announces The Release Of New Uninterruptible Power Supply For The Transportation Industry

     

    http://prn.to/VkAtnr
    24 Jun, 02:43 PM Reply Like
  • CoryM
    , contributor
    Comments (79) | Send Message
     
    I like this article as well...
    http://prn.to/1jeG8jW
    since PbC is referenced in the product details...
    http://bit.ly/1dT9Ddq
    24 Jun, 02:59 PM Reply Like
  • dastar
    , contributor
    Comments (285) | Send Message
     
    Yes, the EB1 product line is the one that features the PbC (the product page also mentions GEL/AGM). I re-read TG's 3rd quarter press release where he spoke of the EB1 and he spoke of how the existing solution Multilink had for areas that have power instability do not last and are subject to high maintenance costs as well as replacement costs.

     

    I'm hoping that this means some of the future replacements are instead upgraded to the EB1 with PbCs rather than simply swapped out with existing gel/agm batteres and that PbC sales via MultiLink are on the horizon.

     

    Time will tell.
    24 Jun, 03:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Cory, I'd seen the last link you provided as someone posted it in the past. I do wish MultiLink was more aggressive in pushing it into the transportation industry where I think it has advantages over AGM. Not that this wouldn't apply to wireless as well. I do wonder where they might be in any integration of the product since it would require augmentation of the charge circuit and the inverter.
    24 Jun, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Ahem.

     

    BATTERY storage developer RedFlow today said it has raised $6.06 million in a shareholder offer that was more than $2 million oversubscribed.

     

    http://bit.ly/1jfqHbl
    24 Jun, 05:57 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    Yessir!
    24 Jun, 06:10 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1038) | Send Message
     
    So all Axion needs to do now is sign a major multiyear supply deal with an industry giant and we can then also expect a successful share issue at a 30% discount to market like Reflow got.
    25 Jun, 09:20 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    I guess JCI is doing work w/ carbon. Is this an Ultrabattery knock off?

     

    Capacitor electrodes for lead-acid battery with surface-modified additives

     

    http://bit.ly/1jfDwm2
    24 Jun, 07:08 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    That should probably be sent to the protectors of Axion's IP.
    24 Jun, 09:26 PM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    I use to buy X-100 by the 55 gallon drum.
    24 Jun, 09:36 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I used the Tritons at vanishly small ratios in pharmaceutical formulations research.

     

    The patent sure does seem to be a knock-off of the UB patent.
    25 Jun, 03:31 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2893) | Send Message
     
    Are there such "protectors" or is it TG on the porch with a broom?
    25 Jun, 07:37 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Bazooooka, Other than process and specific design features I don't know how anyone can protect LABs with any form of carbon added to lead in the NAM. I think it's pretty much open source industry information that it improves performance in some areas. Now pure carbon NAM in a LAB is another thing all together. Everything we've read IMO indicates there is more protection involved than a broom swat.

     

    That being said, lawyers are expensive.
    25 Jun, 08:02 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1038) | Send Message
     
    It says right in Axion's 10-k that they cannot afford to protect their patents. I brought this up a couple months ago and JP told me it was a standard disclaimer.
    26 Jun, 08:53 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30232) | Send Message
     
    Until a competitor is commercially selling a product that infringes a patent there is no basis for a lawsuit. In practice, you don't file an infringement lawsuit until a competitor is selling a lot of product that infrinnges your patent because without big sales there is no damage. If it ever comes down to a fight, Axion's priority dates ranging from 2002 through 2012 will make life very difficult for a Johnny-come-lately.
    26 Jun, 09:02 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Press Release Ad for another 48V report ...

     

    http://bit.ly/1jfKCH8

     

    "BOSTON, June 23, 2014--(PR Newswire)--

     

    48V Architectures: New Emissions and Fuel Economy Mandates Reawaken Interest, Says Strategy Analytics

     

    But Deployment Will Be Long Term, With Annual Demand Reaching Up To 2.7M Units By 2020

     

    BOSTON, June 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- A group of German auto makers had earlier agreed to develop a standard for 48V architectures to support efforts in raising fuel economy and lowering harmful emissions at the 2011 Automobil Elektronik Kongress in Ludwigsburg, Germany. Changing circumstances since then have confirmed that 48V deployments will begin next year, as mentioned in the recent Strategy Analytics report, 48 Volt Architectures: Not A Question Of 'If', But Of 'How' and 'When'.

     

    Click here for the report: http://bit.ly/1rpQL8A"

     

    If you click that link it says:

     

    "Summary

     

    This report updates an earlier 2012 Insight into developments of 48V architectures, looking to the progress of such developments, the likely adoption by auto makers and what is now driving 48V adoptions compared to the situation two years ago."
    24 Jun, 07:56 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Has anyone here purchased the report? Checking the table of contents, under venders.

     

    3.3 System Vendors
    3.3.1 Bosch
    3.3.2 Continental
    3.3.3 CPT
    3.3.4 Delphi
    3.3.5 Hella
    3.3.6 ProDrive
    3.3.7 Ricardo
    3.3.8 Schaeffler
    3.3.9 Valeo

     

    Delphi's web page.....automotive, leads you to....Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology.... http://bit.ly/1ryVchy

     

    Prodrive is into the race car building. Some of the race car tech has been mentioned here on this concentrator....
    http://www.prodrive.com

     

    http://bit.ly/1ryWp8A

     

    Hella does automotive lighting (remember the old headlamps would really drain the battery)....

     

    http://bit.ly/1ryV9SQ

     

    Valeo search takes me , wiper blades or clutch kits.... http://bit.ly/1ryVchF

     

    Bosch does automotive aftermarket and power tools.

     

    Continental, tires and brake systems...... http://bit.ly/1ryVcxX

     

    http://bit.ly/1ryV9SW...

     

    http://bit.ly/1ryVcy2

     

    Ricardo looks like a competitor. Ricardo’s breadth of expertise ensures true vehicle optimization and real world benefits. An unsurpassed combination of battery development capability and engineering expertise provides an extension of your in-house battery pack development as well as complete, outsourced battery pack designs...

     

    http://bit.ly/1ryVcy3

     

    Schaeffler.... "Schaeffler develops and manufactures precision products for everything that moves – in machines, equipment, and vehicles as well as in aviation and aerospace applications – with its INA, LuK, and FAG brands." ...
    "The two leading international automotive suppliers Schaeffler and Continental are taking advantage of the 35th International Vienna Motor Symposium (May 8 to 9, 2014) to present the Gasoline Technology Car (GTC). The joint GTC project demonstrates how a networked integration of key mild hybrid technologies can cut fuel consumption as well as CO2 emissions by an additional 17 percent in the case of an already highly efficient car with downsized 3-cylinder gasoline engine – the Ford Focus 1.0 l EcoBoost."....

     

    "Main elements of the integrative approach
    The project partners optimized every aspect of the GTC’s powertrain engineering: Appropriately adapted Continental injection and engine control units replace the system in the reference vehicle. Numerous innovative components and technologies were also added. Playing key roles are Continental’s 48 Volt Eco Drive System as mild hybridization and Schaeffler’s electronic clutch (e-clutch) for power transmission and its thermal management module. These are complemented by measures to reduce friction loss in the engine and an electrically heatable catalytic converter (Emitec). With these components and the intelligent operating strategy, the GTC prototype not only ups fuel efficiency by 17 percent overall. It also meets the limits set by the upcoming Euro 6c emissions standard (2017/2018)"...... http://bit.ly/1ryVcy7

     

    I have a doctors appointment and have to quit for now. Have fun..

     

    3.3 System Vendors
    3.3.1 Bosch
    3.3.2 Continental
    3.3.3 CPT
    3.3.4 Delphi
    3.3.5 Hella
    3.3.6 ProDrive
    3.3.7 Ricardo
    3.3.8 Schaeffler
    3.3.9 Valeo

     

    4 System Deployment

     

    4.1 Energy Storage
    4.2 Battery Monitoring
    4.3 Motor-Generators
    4.4 Electric Superchargers
    4.5 DC-DC Converters
    4.6 Active Suspension Systems
    4.6.1 Audi
    4.6.2 Ford
    4.6.3 Porsche
    4.6.4 Lexus
    25 Jun, 01:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9575) | Send Message
     
    Masi, IIRC here is their energy storage interests.

     

    3.3 System Vendors
    3.3.1 Bosch- Lithium ion and LABs
    3.3.2 Continental- Aligned with Maxwell
    3.3.3 CPT- N/A
    3.3.4 Delphi- Fuel cells
    3.3.5 Hella- N/A
    3.3.6 ProDrive- ?
    3.3.7 Ricardo- Design services
    3.3.8 Schaeffler- N/A
    3.3.9 Valeo- N/A

     

    25 Jun, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1038) | Send Message
     
    There was some speculation a while back that Bosch may have been one of the automotive battery suppliers that BMW had asked to work with Axion.
    25 Jun, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    speculation - Bosch was one of those things that Axion may have redacted from the denied grant application.
    25 Jun, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18060) | Send Message
     
    06/24/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 30, MinTrSz: 700, MaxTrSz: 100000, Vol: 426360, AvTrSz: 14212
    Min. Pr: 0.1500, Max Pr: 0.1529, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1504
    # Buys, Shares: 7 56757, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1513
    # Sells, Shares: 22 364861, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1502
    # Unkn, Shares: 1 4742, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.1520
    Buy:Sell 1:6.43 (13.31% "buys"), DlyShts 53499 (12.55%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 14.66%

     

    The large bid at $0.15 – 400K from CDEL was combined with the ETRF 100K bid and ATDF's 10K (and NITE off and on?) to potentially offer support at $0.15 again. My suspicions that the 400K might not be serious was unfounded – it stayed in place and was all gobbled up today along with the other 110K+. Darn good thing too! Over the last several days I had said I thought a lot of folks were looking to get out at >=$0.15, that I thought the $0.15 support moment of truth was near, ...

     

    All too true it looks like. Now the question is are the sellers out or not. From what I saw late in the day the urge to exit was strong. NITE, ATDF and one MM I couldn't catch frequently lowered offers late in the day at the same time that some buyers took advantage and bought above $0.15, but not by much. In the last hour 89,962 shares traded at a VWAP of $0.1511 with a buy percentage of 48.91%.

     

    The last time we had “large” apparent support of 700K+, before the new shares from the PIPE deal were in the market, that support didn't hold long and we went down upon exhaustion of that quantity. I don't know we'll repeat but there's been a tendency for market action to do so.

     

    We did manage to improve the buy percentage from yesterday's 2.8% - we got 13.3%. Not great, but better than a sharp stick in the eye. Concomitant with that, the daily short sales percentage moved from 1.28% to 12.55% today.

     

    Recent VWAPs oldest through today ...

     

    Of the longer-term rising support I described yesterday (short form: low of 2/24 through the low of 6/23), I said “Everything I see says we will close below it tomorrow, 6/24, because it is rising and share price is compressing towards $0.15”. We did close below it. If we close below it again, it is no longer in play ... unless it's another one of those “squeakers”, in which case I leave it and see if we come back.

     

    The larger trades (>= 15K) occurred on 9 of the 30 trades, 30.00%. These 320,527 shares were 75.18% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1502. 1 of the larger trades, 11.11%, were buys ...

     

    The other 21 trades, 70.00% of the day's trades, traded 105,833 shares, 24.82% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1511. 6 trades, 28.57%, were buys ...

     

    The usual is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    25 Jun, 08:23 AM Reply Like